Review-Journal asks judge to unseal Bundy docs, hearings

“Secret justice is no justice at all,” Review-Journal Managing Editor Glenn Cook said. “The federal system’s preference for closed doors and sealed documents has eroded public confidence in the integrity and impartiality of the courts. Openness is the only way taxpayers can be sure they’re not funding a rigged game.”

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersNot much of anything gets their attention like the interest of a large media outlet (like the Review-Journal) especially if there is a law suit threat to go along with it.  — jtl, 419

by David Ferrara at the Las Vegas Review Journal

U.S. District Judge Gloria Navarro. (Las Vegas Review-Journal file)U.S. District Judge Gloria Navarro. (Las Vegas Review-Journal file)

 Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual  Two days after a federal judge suggested the possibility of a mistrial in the Bunkerville standoff case, the Las Vegas Review-Journal and a group of Nevada newspapers filed a motion to unseal trial documents discussed behind closed courtroom doors.

‘There is insufficient basis to maintain certain motions and transcripts under seal in this case and to continue to close hearings to the public,” the motion filed Wednesday evening states. “Sealing documents and closing hearings is inimical to this Country’s and this Court’s long tradition of open trials, guaranteed by both the First Amendment and common law — a right of access that is always important, but particularly critical in this case.”

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewThree weeks into testimony about the 2014 armed conflict, U.S. District Judge Gloria Navarro on Monday said government prosecutors did not provide evidence in a timely fashion to the defendants, including rancher Cliven Bundy, two of his sons and an independent Montana militiaman.

The judge released jurors for a week and then closed her courtroom to the public for a hearing with the defendants, their lawyers and prosecutors.

Combat Shooter's Handbook Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits“The Bundy case is an important one to the people of Nevada, and the public has a right to know what is happening in the case, and why,” said lawyer Maggie McLetchie, who represents the Review-Journal and Battle Born Media, which publishes weekly newspapers in rural communities.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)“Secret justice is no justice at all,” Review-Journal Managing Editor Glenn Cook said. “The federal system’s preference for closed doors and sealed documents has eroded public confidence in the integrity and impartiality of the courts. Openness is the only way taxpayers can be sure they’re not funding a rigged game.”

Contact David Ferrara at dferrara@reviewjournal.com or 702-380-1039. Follow @randompoker on Twitter.

 

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Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualPlanned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual. This is the ideal squeal to A Handbook for Ranch Managers.  Although the ecological principles remain the same, what was originally known as “The Savory Grazing Method” now answers to a multitude of different names: ranching for profit, holistic management, managed grazing, mob grazing, management intensive grazing, etc. Land & Livestock International, Inc. uses “Restoration Grazing” under its “Managing the Ranch as a Business” program.” No mater what you call it, this summary and synopsis will guide you step by step through the process and teach you how to use it as it was originally intended. No more excuses for failing to complete your grazing plans.

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Peer-Reviewed studies, historical data reject claims California wildfires are due to man-made climate change

But the scientific facts and historical record reveal such “wrath of God” claims to be baseless.

A Handbook for Ranch Managers  And anthropological caused climate change is as believable as my believing I can flap my arms and fly. The problem is irresponsible land management on behalf of the government’s land management agencies.

Turn these lands over to their rightful owners (the families–or their heirs and assigns-that have lived on and worked the land for 4 or 5 generations. Problem solved. — jtl, 419

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualBy: Marc Morano – vi Climate Depot

Climate Depot Analysis

Once again, the media and climate activists are blaming wildfires on man-made “global warming.” See: California governor blames devastating wildfires on climate change and says deadly winter infernos will be ‘the new normal’

Image result for jerry brown climate change

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewGov. Brown is even mixing religion into his odd scientific brew: See: From The Hill story: California Gov. Jerry Brown (D) says President Trump’s stance on climate change demonstrates that he does not appear to fear the “wrath of God” or have any regard for the “existential consequences” of his environmental policies. Brown: “I don’t think President Trump has a fear of the Lord, the fear of the wrath of God, which Combat Shooter's Handbook Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfitsleads one to more humility … this is such a reckless disregard for the truth and for the existential consequences that can be unleashed,” Brown said in an interview on CBS’s “60 Minutes.” (Note: Brown was echoing the film Ghostbusters: Dr Ray Stantz: “What he means is Old Testament, Mr. Mayor, real wrath of God type stuff.” See: ‘The dead rising from the grave!’ Global warming claims imitate scene from 1984 comedy ‘Ghostbusters’ – ‘A disaster of biblical proportions…real wrath of God type stuff’)

Wildfire Reality Check:

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) But the scientific facts and historical record reveal such “wrath of God” claims to be baseless. The notion that alleged man-made climate change is causing California’s fires is not supported by recent peer-reviewed scientific studies or historical data. Even the LA Times has previously rebuked Gov. Jerry Brown for making such scientifically baseless claims about wildfires. But the hard scientific data revealing no connection to ‘global warming’ will not prevent the media and climate activists from their usual claims trying to link wildfires to ‘climate change.’”

2016 study: Less fires globally than centuries ago

A 2016 study in published by the UK Royal Society reported, “There is less fire in the global landscape today than centuries ago” and the “global area burned” has seen a “slight decline over past decades.”  The study, by Stefan Doerr and Cristina Santin of Swansea University in Wales, noted “many consider wildfire as an accelerating problem, with widely held perceptions both in the media and scientific papers of increasing fire occurrence, severity and resulting losses. However, important exceptions aside, the quantitative evidence available does not support these perceived overall trends.” The study also found that the data for the western U.S. indicates “little change overall, and also that area burned at high severity has overall declined compared to pre-European settlement. Direct fatalities from fire and economic losses also show no clear trends over the past three decades.” The researchers concluded: “The data available to date do not support a general increase in area burned or in fire severity for many regions of the world. Indeed there is increasing evidence that there is overall less fire in the landscape today than there has been centuries ago, although the magnitude of this reduction still needs to be examined in more detail.”

 

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Combat Shooter's Handbook Combat Shooter’s Handbook. Call for a pizza, a cop, and an  ambulance and see which one arrives first. So, who does that leave to protect you, your life, property and family? The one and only answer is: YOU This Handbook is intended to help you exercise that right and meet that responsibility. Available in both paperback and Kindle versions.

 

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Las Vegas judge hints at mistrial in Bunkerville standoff case

…after the judge read through a long list of documents, witness names and other information that she said government prosecutors did not provide to defendants in a timely fashion…That failure to disclose details that could benefit Bundy, sons Ammon and Ryan, and independent Montana militiaman Ryan Payne was “sufficient to undermine the confidence in the outcome of the trial,” Navarro said…She indicated that prosecutors failed to meet deadlines to turn over evidence at least seven times.

A Handbook for Ranch Managers Well, whadaya expect from a gubment job? lotflmao

By David Ferrara Las Vegas Review-Journal

Ammon Bundy leaves the Lloyd George U.S. Courthouse on Monday, Dec. 11, 2017, in Las Vegas. A federal judge in Las Vegas raised the prospect of a mistrial Monday for four main defendants, includin ...

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual  Ammon Bundy leaves the Lloyd George U.S. Courthouse on Monday, Dec. 11, 2017, in Las Vegas. A federal judge in Las Vegas raised the prospect of a mistrial Monday for four main defendants, including Cliven Bundy, in the Bunkerville standoff case. Bizuayehu Tesfaye Las Vegas Review-Journal @bizutesfaye

Ryan Bundy leaves the Lloyd George U.S. Courthouse on Monday, Dec. 11, 2017, in Las Vegas. A federal judge in Las Vegas raised the prospect of a mistrial Monday for four main defendants, including ...
Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewRyan Bundy leaves the Lloyd George U.S. Courthouse on Monday, Dec. 11, 2017, in Las Vegas. A federal judge in Las Vegas raised the prospect of a mistrial Monday for four main defendants, including Cliven Bundy, in the Bunkerville standoff case. Bizuayehu Tesfaye Las Vegas Review-Journal @bizutesfaye
Ammon Bundy, center, leaves the Lloyd George U.S. Courthouse on Monday, Dec. 11, 2017, in Las Vegas. A federal judge in Las Vegas raised the prospect of a mistrial Monday for four main defendants, ...
 Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps InstituteAmmon Bundy, center, leaves the Lloyd George U.S. Courthouse on Monday, Dec. 11, 2017, in Las Vegas. A federal judge in Las Vegas raised the prospect of a mistrial Monday for four main defendants, including Cliven Bundy, in the Bunkerville standoff case. Bizuayehu Tesfaye Las Vegas Review-Journal @bizutesfaye
Ammon Bundy leaves the Lloyd George U.S. Courthouse on Monday, Dec. 11, 2017, in Las Vegas. A federal judge in Las Vegas raised the prospect of a mistrial Monday for four main defendants, includin ...
The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits Ammon Bundy leaves the Lloyd George U.S. Courthouse on Monday, Dec. 11, 2017, in Las Vegas. A federal judge in Las Vegas raised the prospect of a mistrial Monday for four main defendants, including Cliven Bundy, in the Bunkerville standoff case. Bizuayehu Tesfaye Las Vegas Review-Journal @bizutesfaye
Ryan Bundy leaves the Lloyd George U.S. Courthouse on Monday, Dec. 11, 2017, in Las Vegas. A federal judge in Las Vegas raised the prospect of a mistrial Monday for four main defendants, including ...
Combat Shooter's HandbookRyan Bundy leaves the Lloyd George U.S. Courthouse on Monday, Dec. 11, 2017, in Las Vegas. A federal judge in Las Vegas raised the prospect of a mistrial Monday for four main defendants, including Cliven Bundy, in the Bunkerville standoff case. Bizuayehu Tesfaye Las Vegas Review-Journal

A federal judge in Las Vegas raised the prospect of a mistrial Monday for four main defendants, including lifelong rancher Cliven Bundy, in the Bunkerville standoff case.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)The indication from U.S. District Judge Gloria Navarro came three weeks into testimony about the 2014 armed conflict, and after the judge read through a long list of documents, witness names and other information that she said government prosecutors did not provide to defendants in a timely fashion.

That failure to disclose details that could benefit Bundy, sons Ammon and Ryan, and independent Montana militiaman Ryan Payne was “sufficient to undermine the confidence in the outcome of the trial,” Navarro said.

She indicated that prosecutors failed to meet deadlines to turn over evidence at least seven times.

Before making a decision, however, the judge dismissed jurors, who had returned for testimony after a weeklong break, and later indicated they would not be called back to court until at least Dec. 20.

After releasing the jury, Navarro closed her courtroom to the public for a hearing with the defendants, their lawyers and prosecutors.

“I hope to get the case dismissed before the jurors come back,” Cliven Bundy’s attorney, Bret Whipple, later said.

Daniel Hill, an attorney for Ammon Bundy, said he had the same desire.

“That’s exactly what dismissal is designed for — when the government proceeds while violating their constitutional mandates,” Hill said.

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Prosecutors have until Friday to respond to the judge’s concern that they missed evidence deadlines, along with questions she had about 14 other possible trial violations.

Earlier this month, Navarro ordered Cliven Bundy, Ammon Bundy and Payne released from federal detention, but Cliven Bundy rejected the conditions of house arrest and remains in custody without bail.

In opening statements of the trial, which had been expected to last through February, Whipple told jurors that Cliven Bundy spent decades trying to negotiate peacefully with federal authorities before supporters of the family arrived in southeastern Nevada, some of them with long guns, and squared off against the Bureau of Land Management.

Acting U.S. Attorney Steven Myhre said the rancher and others conspired with a threat of violence to drive federal agents off public land around his home.

At the time, agents were trying to execute a court order to round up Cliven Bundy’s cattle. Prosecutors have said the rancher and sons Ammon and Ryan organized the standoff, while Payne encouraged others to travel to it.

Asked on Monday whether he expected the 71-year-old Gold Butte rancher and family patriarch to be home for the Christmas holiday, Whipple said, “I certainly would hope so.”

Ryan Bundy, who is representing himself at trial, was released from custody a month ago. Last week, four more defendants, including two of Cliven Bundy’s other sons, David and Melvin, were released while they await trial.

Hill said Ammon Bundy was “ecstatic” to be home after nearly two years behind bars without bail.

As for developments in the trial, the lawyer added: “He’s very pleased that the truth he’s been talking about for years is finally starting to come out.”

Contact David Ferrara at dferrara@reviewjournal.com or 702-380-1039. Follow @randompoker on Twitter.

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A Handbook for Ranch ManagersA Handbook for Ranch Managers.  In keeping with the “holistic” idea that the land, the livestock, the people and the money should be viewed as a single integrated whole: Part I deals with the management of the natural resources. Part II covers livestock production and Part III deals with the people and the money. Not only would this book make an excellent basic text for a university program in Ranch Management, no professional ranch manager’s reference bookshelf should be without it. It is a comprehensive reference manual for managing the working ranch. The information in the appendices and extensive bibliography alone is worth the price of the book.

You might also be interested in the supplement to this Handbook: Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual.

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A senator’s falsehood, a big win for the Goss family, a BLM move to Denver?

A Handbook for Ranch Managers  A ‘land grab’, really?

A recent news item appeared concerning the growing rift between New Mexico’s two Senators and the Secretary of the Interior. The primary focus of the column was how Udall and Heinrich disagree with much of what Zinke is doing, in spite of them both having voted for his confirmation.

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualThere were two statements in the column that really grabbed me. The first was by Heinrich:

 “I’m prepared to do anything necessary to protect New Mexico’s national monuments from a Washington, D.C., land grab,” Heinrich said.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewThat is just hilarious. Sad, but hilarious. Before the monument, most of these lands were managed for multiple use. If necessary, roads could be built. Rights-of ways could be issued. Flood control dams could be constructed, range improvements could be built, geothermal energy could be harvested, sportsmen and recreationists had off-road access to these lands, and so on. Then along came Obama, with the full encouragement of Heinrich, and with the stroke of a pen either prohibited or restricted all of the above. If the monument designation were to be removed, all of those uses would be returned to the people. The review had the possibility of revoking a land grab, not initiating one. Heinrich’s attempt to describe it otherwise is laughable.

Combat Shooter's HandbookReconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps InstituteThe Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsThe other statement in the article, which is not new, is the Senators’ concern over accuracy:

Staffers for both senators told me last week that Udall and Heinrich also want Zinke to address errors of fact in the New Mexico sections of the monuments report.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) This must be a newfound desire for accuracy, for we didn’t hear a peep out of the Senators concerning the many inaccuracies in Obama’s proclamation creating the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks National Monument. Dr. Jerry Schickedanz, Dean Emeritus at NMSU and currently with the Linebery Policy Center, has identified many errors in the proclamation, including objects that aren’t even within the boundaries of the monument, and other objects that are either wholly or partially on private or state land, and therefore not in the monument. These and other errors could have been addressed during the review process, but by opposing the review, the good Senators apparently do not want those inaccuracies corrected.

Because of the importance of these documents to the local community and to the health of the natural resource, both should corrected. This selective, narrow focus on errors falls short of good public policy and reeks of pure politics.

Of thistles, poppies & water rights

A pioneer New Mexico ranch family has won an important case for property rights.

The Goss family has been raising livestock in the Sacramento Mountains of New Mexico since 1885. Respect to that family for persevering through all these years with a successful ranching operation.

A hundred years later along comes the Forest Service to erect “enclosures” to keep livestock out of certain riparian areas, ostensibly to protect the Sacramento Mountains Thistle. Additional “enclosures” were later constructed on behalf of the Southwestern Prickly Poppy. In addition to having their livestock fenced off water, in 2000 their allotment was cut from 553 head to 428, with additional cuts in 2004. The Goss family had sought to pipe water into the allotment, but those requests were denied by the Forest Service.

In 2004 the Goss family filed a claim in the United States Court of Federal Claims alleging a Taking under the fifth amendment of their water rights, their grazing permit and their preference rights.Over time, their claims on the grazing permit and preference rights were dismissed. Further, the New Mexico Supreme Court had ruled that a vested stock watering right did not lead to a right to forage, nor did a right-of-way create a compensable right to forage.

Through many twists and turns this all led up to a favorable 2017 decision on vested (pre-1907) stock watering rights, and rest assured the feds fought it each step of the way.

Among other things, the feds argued that even if there was a compensable property interest in the water rights, the statute of limitations applied in this instance. Wrong said the court, ruling the statute of limitations did not bar the court from adjudicating the Goss’ Taking claims.

The feds argued the Goss documents claiming the right to put the water to beneficial use were inadequate. Wrong said the court, ruling the Goss family had established a prima facie right to beneficial use of the water as required by New Mexico law.

The feds argued the acquisition of a water right under New Mexico law requires a diversion of the water and the consumption of water by livestock is not a diversion.Wrong said the court, finding that “neither state statutes nor case law require a physical diversion to establish the right of beneficial use of stock water.”

Finally, the feds argued that even if the ranchers had a property right in the use of the water, they were only entitled to beneficial use, not a right of access to a particular location. The court ruled it was a well-established principle that a physical taking occurs if the government denies an owner all access to a property interest. The court further ruled the Forest Service had incrementally, and then finally, denied the Goss family beneficial use of stock water.

In conclusion, the court said before it determines the amount of compensation to be awarded, both parties should make a renewed effort to see if alternative sources of water could be made available.

This is good news for the Goss family and for ranchers with vested water rights, and once again should educate everyone on the importance of water in the West.

The wrong focus

There continue to be reports that Secretary Zinke plans a major reorganization of the Dept. of Interior, including moving the headquarters of BLM and other entities to a western city.

Some want to keep the current centralized system of resource management. Others propose transferring the majority of these lands to the states, or some other form of decentralized management. Zinke appears to be proposing a sort of halfway house, transferring the managers instead of the resource. My thought is that as long as the federal laws (ESA, FLPMA, NEPA, etc.) remain as currently written and interpreted, the same poor results will occur no matter where the federal managers are located. Further, much precious time will be taken up debating where the federal landlords are stationed, rather than focusing on the real problem and potential solutions.

If your grazing permit is cancelled or your private lands are taken as a result of a critical habitat designation, will you really care whether the decision-maker is in Denver or DC?

I’m afraid this is more about the plain old politics of moving federal jobs and dollars, rather than being a sincere attempt to correct the many problems associated with federal ownership of our resources.

Here’s wishing everyone a Merry Christmas and a prosperous New Year.

Frank DuBois was the NM Secretary of Agriculture from 1988 to 2003, is the author of a blog: The Westerner (www.thewesterner.blogspot.com) and is the founder of The DuBois Rodeo Scholarship and The DuBois Western Heritage Foundation

This column first appeared in the December editions of the NM Stockman and the Livestock Market Digest

 

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The Essence of Liberty: Volume II (The Economics of Liberty)The Essence of Liberty Volume II: The Economics of Liberty will introduce the reader to the fundamental principles of the Austrian School of Economics. The Austrian School traces its origins back to the Scholastics of Medieval Spain. But its lineage actually began with Carl Menger and continued on through Adam Smith, Ludwig von Mises, Murray Rothbard and many others. It is the one and only true private property based, free market line of economic thought. Available in both paperback and Kindle versions.

You might be interested in the other two volumes of this three volume set: The Essence of Liberty Volume I: Liberty and History and The Essence of Liberty Volume III: Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic. 

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Mueller Probe, Political Bias, And Deep State Sabotage

News and commentary that will shatter your illusion of knowledge. NewsWithViews.com is updated daily with columns by writers such as Devvy Kidd, Kelleigh Nelson…

Source: Mueller Probe, Political Bias, And Deep State Sabotage

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FINALLY! President Trump Kicks Off The Rollback Of National Monument Abuse

This will make hard-pressed local communities more competitive by allowing grazing, logging, commercial fishing and, in some cases, mineral development.

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersThat is only if they can figure out how to drain the Deep State Swamp that calls itself “land management agencies” (Bureau of Land Management, uS Forest Service, Fish and Wildlife Service, etc). They are full of entrenched radical environmentalist Swamp Rats. — jtl, 419

by Bonner Cohen and Martha Boneta via The Daily Caller

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualBy significantly reducing the size of two gargantuan national monuments on federal land in Utah, President Donald Trump has begun to undo the decades-old mistreatment of rural Westerners by smug elites in faraway Washington.

In doing so, he has shown a respect for the rule of law that was conspicuously absent when President Bill Clinton created the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in 1996, and when President Barack Obama designated the Bears Ears National Monument in 2016. Under the Antiquities Act of 1906, only objects of historic or scientific interest are to be protected “within the smallest area compatible with the protection of those objects.” In keeping with the letter and spirit of the law, the first national monument, Devils Tower in Wyoming, was less than 1,200 acres.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewCompare that size with Clinton’s Grand Staircase-Escalante designation, which covered 1.9 million acres or Obama’s Bear Ears designation, which came in at 1.35 million acres.  A law originally intended to protect Native American artifacts from plunder was transformed into an instrument to create de facto wilderness areas, with severe restrictions on land use and public access. Instead of safeguarding sacred tribal sites and archeological treasures, the law has been stretched to include protecting World War II bombing craters, “biodiversity,” “view sheds” and “remoteness.”

What’s more, under the Wilderness Act of 1963, only Congress has the power create wilderness areas, not the White House through executive fiat. By circumventing Congress on the Wilderness Act, and through twisting the wording of the Antiquities Act beyond recognition, Presidents Clinton, Obama and George W. Bush tightened the grip of the federal administrative state over the lives of ordinary Americans.

Clinton’s actions in establishing the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument are instructive. The designation was made despite the objections of state and local officials in Utah, and without soliciting the views of people living in communities near the monument. Indeed, the only people consulted were environmentalists, who, like the Clinton administration, were eager to make the area’s abundant natural resources permanently off-limits to beneficial human use.

Reversing Course

Now the Trump White House and the Department of Interior are reversing course. The administration is making sure that local communities have a voice by restoring traditional “multiple use” activities on these lands. This will make hard-pressed local communities more competitive by allowing grazing, logging, commercial fishing and, in some cases, mineral development.

The two monuments targeted will be substantially pared back. Clinton’s sprawling Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument will be cut in half, to about one million acres and divided into three separate monuments. Obama’s Bears Ears monument will have its size reduced from 1.35 million acres to roughly 220,000 acres and will be split up into two sites. The smaller size of both monuments and the lifting of access restrictions will enable Interior Department personnel to carry out long-overdue infrastructure improvements on the sites, including upgrading public restrooms, visitors’ centers and trails.

“Some people think the natural resources of Utah should be controlled by a handful of very distant bureaucrats in Washington. And guess what? They’re wrong,” Trump to a gathering in Salt Lake City on Dec. 4. “The families of communities of Utah know and love this land the best and you know best how to take care of this land.”

To-Do List

With this spirit in mind, it’s time for the Trump White and Secretary Ryan Zinke’s Interior Department to right the wrongs at other national monuments around the country, including the Katahdin Woods and Waters in Maine, the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks in New Mexico, Cascade Siskiyou in Oregon and California, Basin and Range in Nevada and castle Mountains in California.

The administration is going down the right path, and we eagerly await their next steps.

Bonner R. Cohen, Ph. D., is a senior policy analyst with the Committee for a Constructive Tomorrow (CFACT). Martha Boneta is a policy advisor with America First Policies and is a farmer at Liberty Farm in Paris, Virginia.  

Martha Boneta is a policy adviser with America First Policies. She is a farmer at Liberty Farm in Paris, Virginia. The native Virginian was also voted by Country Woman Magazine as one of the “45 Most Amazing Women in America.”


The views and opinions expressed in this commentary are those of the author and do not reflect the official position of The Daily Caller.

Land & Livestock International, Inc is offering a “Free” week-long ranch management-planned grazing seminar-workshop.

What follows is a business model we have been following that has worked very well for us and for our clientele.

We are seeking individual ranchers to sponsor/host workshops . The sponsor/host (and spouse or key employee) get the training at his/her ranch for no charge. This is an extra special benefit to the host as his/her land will be used for the “lab” work and hands on demonstrations. This provides a great start in the implementation of his/her program.

In return, he/she takes care of the logistics involved in putting on the event. This includes arranging for the venue, booking a block of rooms for lodging, arranging for meals (if any), putting out the advertising, setting and collecting the fees and so forth.

We are then responsible for putting on the workshop.

During the interim we will each keep track of our out of pocket costs (from our end, that will be mostly travel and lodging). Then, when it is all over, we both are reimbursed our out of pocket costs and split any funds remaining 50:50.

If this sounds like something you might be interested in, click here and let us know. If the link won’t work for you, copy and paste info@landandlivestockinternational.com into your browser.

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These Hungry Goats Learned to Branch Out

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersA reliable source has it that “The meek shall inherit the earth.”  That would be goats and cock roaches. lol But seriously…

We (actually it was mostly my wife’s project) used to run a couple of hundred head of Spanish goats. These hearty little creatures are highly susceptible to predation, especially during the kidding season (everything, including me, likes kid goat meat).  And we had about every kind of predator you can think of, everything from mountain lions to ring tail cats.

 Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual  In spite of all of that, we (the wife) raised a 110% kid crop (there were about 20 sets of twins) and, to the best of our knowledge, we did not loose  a single goat to a predator. How? Simple.

The corral at the headquarters was constructed of high “bull wire” net fence. The goats spent the night in the corral. Then, first thing in the morning, the wife would go down to the corral and turn out the nannies leaving the kids in the corral for the day.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewThe nannies would browse all day and then along about 4 PM they were always found at the gate of the corral, bags swollen, needing to be nursed. The wife would meet them there, open the gate and they would put themselves up for the night. 

Those were what I always refer to as “better days.” — jtl, 419

By via the New York Times

Photo

Credit Dave Watts/Minden Pictures

Combat Shooter's HandbookNo, this is not an illustration from a book by Dr. Seuss.

These domestic goats live in southwestern Morocco, where the climate is dry and in some seasons the only available forage is in the trees. So the goats climb up to get it.

Goats are good climbers — some sure-footed species live happily on mountains, leaping from ledge to ledge. But these domestic goats are not born with an ability to climb trees. They learn the technique as kids.

Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute Their keepers help them climb, and they trim the trees to make it easier for the kids. The goats eventually learn to do it themselves. In the autumn, when there is little food on the ground, they spend most of their time grazing the treetops.

Now researchers have found that the trees benefit, too. Many animals eat the seeds of plants and then defecate them at another location. But the seeds of the argan trees that these goats graze on are about an inch long and a half-inch across — too big for a goat to pass.

The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsFortunately for the trees, goats are ruminants: They chew their cud and regurgitate it to be rechewed before being swallowed for good. The researchers suspect that while the goats ruminate, they spit out the large seeds, often far away from the mother plant, increasing the chance of seed and seedling survival.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)A version of this article appears in print on June 13, 2017, on Page D2 of the New York edition with the headline: Tree Party: Hungry Goats Learn to Branch Out. Continue reading the main story

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Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View

edited by

Dr Jimmy T (Gunny) LaBaume

Is now available in both PAPERBACK and Kindle

BookCoverImageMurray N. Rothbard was the father of what some call Radical Libertarianism or Anarcho-Capitalism which Hans-Hermann Hoppe described as “Rothbard’s unique contribution to the rediscovery of property and property rights as the common foundation of both economics and political philosophy, and the systematic reconstruction and conceptual integration of modern, marginalist economics and natural-law political philosophy into a unified moral science: libertarianism.”

This book applies the principles of this “unified moral science” to environmental and natural resource management issues.

The book started out life as an assigned reading list for a university level course entitled Environmental and Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View.

As I began to prepare to teach the course, I quickly saw that there was a plethora of textbooks suitable for universal level courses dealing with environmental and natural resource economics. The only problem was that they were all based in mainstream neo-classical (or Keynesian) theory. I could find no single collection of material comprising a comprehensive treatment of environmental and natural resource economics based on Austrian Economic Theory.

However, I was able to find a large number of essays, monographs, papers delivered at professional meetings and published from a multitude of sources. This book is the result. It is composed of a collection of research reports and essays by reputable scientists, economists, and legal experts as well as private property and free market activists.

The book is organized into seven parts: I. Environmentalism: The New State Religion; II. The New State Religion Debunked; III. Introduction to Environmental and Natural Resource Economics; IV. Interventionism: Law and Regulation; V. Pollution and Recycling; VI. Property Rights: Planning, Zoning and Eminent Domain; and VII. Free Market Conservation. It also includes an elaborate Bibliography, References and Recommended Reading section including an extensive Annotated Bibliography of related and works on the subject.

The intellectual level of the individual works ranges from quite scholarly to informed editorial opinion.

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What Is The West?

The West is a place, but it is more (like the South). It is an atmosphere, an enigma, a way of life, and a people. As a way of life, it is something that can be carried far beyond its geographical boundaries.

Yep, and if you happen to have been raised in the West with strong familial roots in the South, you’ve got a double dose of it. — jtl, 419

by Al Benson Jr. at revisedhistory

Folks who have followed my writing for awhile will recognize that what I write below will be a little different than much of what I usually do. I have written about the South for decades now and I love the South. I love the palmetto and palm trees, the Spanish moss, the abundant  wildlife, the bayous, and the wonderful hospitality of Southern people who, even though we were from the North originally, once they found out we understood their history and were willing to defend that history and heritage, opened their arms to us and literally made us “one of them.” So now we live in North Louisiana and we have never regretted the move south. This is home and we are content with it. No complaints!

But along with that, both my wife and I also love the West. We have traveled much there and before I was married I spent parts of several years in the West, including one year that I lived in Oklahoma for part of the year. Oklahoma is still a favorite spot. I was trying to eke out a living painting western scenery. I wasn’t good enough to make a go of that but I still enjoyed it.

When I went “back east” I worked near a bunch of young guys who enjoyed my paintings and when once they got an art show up they wanted me to put some of my stuff in it, which I did. They also wanted me, as someone who had spent time in the West, to submit something written about my impressions of the West. Most of them had never been there except for the big cities and they all look alike to me no matter where they are. I never spent any time in or near cities I didn’t have to, had no interest in them, except for Santa Fe, New Mexico, and it was different.

At any rate, what is below was what I gave them to print up, with some minor modifications. Some of you all that live in the West may be able to identify with some of what I say here.

The West is many things to many people. To those who have never experienced it,  I can only say that they have missed something that will not long remain even as it is now.

The West, to me, is more than a geographical location (like the South).  It is more than the beautiful state of Texas, which most easterners seem to think all westerners come from. It is more than the dry, burned out desert most who have never seen it think it is. They have not learned that there is beauty even in the desert if you know how to look for it.

The West is a place, but it is more (like the South). It is an atmosphere, an enigma, a way of life, and a people. As a way of life, it is something that can be carried far beyond its geographical boundaries.

The West is dark thunderheads far off over the canyon, it is the Prairie Dog Fork of the Red River at flood, it’s Monument Valley at night and the Painted Desert at noon. It’s the flat (but sometimes rolling)  country of the Texas and Oklahoma panhandles and it’s the majestic peace of the high plains country on the Platte River in Wyoming. It is a land so big that when you stand in it you feel small, and you have to realize within your deepest being that God created it and that man,  mighty though he would like to think he is, is only one small finite part of it.

The West is also people. It’s the old cowboy at the Pawhuska (Oklahoma) rodeo, who upon hearing the announcer reveal the name of the next contestant  in the saddle bronc riding, shouted “That’s my cousin Homer. He cain’t ride nothin’, He’ll get throwed first jump out the gate.” And he did! It’s the man in the store in Guymon, Oklahoma who, when asked if it was always this windy around here, replied “Hell no. Sometimes it gets windier.” It’s the ancient Indian at Taos Pueblo in New Mexico, who, when the smart-alec tourist tried to talk him into letting him into the pueblo for nothing, proceeded to charge him three times as much as he’d charged me to get in. The irate tourist tried to explain to him how, forty years ago, he’d gotten into the pueblo for nothing. After his ten minute (but ineffectual) tirade, the old Indian simply answered “Times change.”

For me the west did not really end each time I recrossed the Mississippi River. Thankfully, living in North Louisiana, we don’t have to recross the Mississippi to go east anymore.

For me, the West is a great deal of all I have seen, felt, lived and experienced during my numerous times in it. The deepness of its experience (like that of the South) is not something that leaves you upon the crossing of a boundary line. You, like many easterners, hate it and never go back (it’s not “green” enough for you) or you love it and continue to go back. There is no middle ground, the same as there is no middle ground with Confederate and Southern heritage. You either live it wherever you go, or you’ve never truly experienced it at all.

Land and Livestock International, Inc. is in a position to assist the buyer in purchasing ranches like these anywhere in the Western United States and Northern Mexico. Pre – purchase services include help with due diligence, estimates of carrying capacity and potential for improvement, cash flow projections, etc. Post purchase services include everything from part time consulting to complete turn-key management.

Contact us at info@landandlivestockinternational.com or through our web site at www.landandlivestockinternational.com

Dripping Springs
Mule Creek, Grant County, New Mexico

The Dripping Springs Ranch is a highly improved working cattle ranch in a very desirable part of southwest New Mexico. Access to the Ranch from State Route 78 is excellent, and it is an easy drive to either Silver City, N. or Safford, Az. 232 deeded acres, 13,000 USFS acres, 150 AU. $2,500,000

Walking L Ranch
Wickenburg, Yavapai County

The Walking L Ranch’s 52+ square miles adjoin Wickenburg from the Hassayamapa River into the Wickenburg Mountains. The ranch originally consisted of the 10X Ranch on the south end and the Rincon Ranch on the north end.  The old Rincon Dude Ranch was added to the ranch’s Headquarters by the current owner. The ranch’s land tenure consists of deeded land, State and BLM Grazing Leases.  Topography is rolling to steep with elevation’s ranging from 2,100’ along the river to over 2,700’ on San Domingo Peak.  The ranch borders US 60 on the south side of Wickenburg.  The ranch’s deeded land is in seven non-contiguous parcels throughout the ranch.  The headquarters consists of 110.88 deeded acres on Rincon Road and the Hassayampa River with approximately 30 acres irrigated.  Another headquarters for the 10X is on the state lease. $5,000,000

Dos S Inholding
Fountain Hills, Maricopa County

The Dos S is a 22.78 acre private inholding surrounded by Tonto National Forest on Sycamore Creek.  It is located just off the Beeline Highway behind a locked gate 20 miles from the Shea Boulevard & Highway 87 intersection at Fountain Hills.  Payson is 40 miles to the north. $1,025,100

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National news reporter calls rural America “core threat” to nation

Following Griffin’s tweet, MSNBC reporter Joy Reid retweeted with the comment, “This is the core threat to our democracy. The rural minority — the people @JYSexton just wrote a long thread about — have and will continue to have disproportionate power over the urban majority.”

A Handbook for Ranch Managers This commie just thinks he has seen “disproportionate power.” He needs to just wait until we decide to put up a rural embargo intended to starve the Marxists cities to death. — jtl, 419

by Amanda Radke via Beef Daily

It’s been just over a year since President Donald Trump was voted into office, and since then, the divisiveness over polarizing issues continues to escalate. There are certainly three sides to every coin, and for most topics, I can empathize with opposing sides to my personal viewpoints, even if I have no intention of changing my stance.

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual Like most things in life, political issues are mostly shades of gray; however, today’s society seems to see things in two colors — black and white. You’re either right or you’re wrong. You’re either left or you’re right. You’re either blue or you’re red. This mentality leaves little room for public discussion, compromise, working together and doing things for the greater good of the nation.

The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsAs this relates to U.S. farmers and ranchers living in quiet communities across the United States, it is becoming painfully obvious that rural Americans are considered public enemy number one. That’s according to some very public figures who recently tweeted about us hicks in the sticks.

Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps InstituteFor example, MSNBC producer Kyle Griffin tweeted over the weekend, “By 2040, about 70% of Americans are expected to live in the 15 largest states. They will have only 30 senators representing them, while the remaining 30% of Americans will have 70 senators representing them.”

Combat Shooter's HandbookIt appears Griffin could use a lesson in our nation’s government. Perhaps, he should be taught the difference between a Democracy and a Republic? I’ll echo what one commenter posted following this tweet: “A Democracy is like having two lions and one lamb decide what’s for dinner.” There’s a reason our founding fathers created the Electoral College, but since the presidential election, it’s becoming an increasingly popular opinion to ditch it altogether.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View I realize I’m getting a bit political in this post, and I promise this blog has a point that should be of concern to any of us living in rural America. What is most alarming to me isn’t the ignorance of our nation’s very core values and the principles of the Constitution that make this nation so great (although that is quite troubling). What alarms me most is the growing disconnect between urban America and its rural counterparts.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)Following Griffin’s tweet, MSNBC reporter Joy Reid retweeted with the comment, “This is the core threat to our democracy. The rural minority — the people @JYSexton just wrote a long thread about — have and will continue to have disproportionate power over the urban majority.”

Reid is referring to author JY Sexton who accused Midwestern rural Americans of being racist with a skewed world view that is a “major, major existential problem.” He wrote that this demographic only believes in the Constitution when it’s “advantageous.”

In response to these tweets, Resurgent editor, radio host and Fox News contributor Erick Erickson wrote, “To have a national ‘news’ host call rural America a ‘core threat’ to our democracy is both striking arrogance and striking ignorance.”

I agree. I wonder if Reid, Griffin or Sexton ever stop to think about where their food, energy and clothes come from. When they’re in a plane going from New York City to Los Angeles, do they ever think about the flyover states and the hard-working people who provide for their daily needs, so they have free time to do things like tweet and drink lattes instead of hunting for food, chopping fire wood, sewing their own clothes and building shelters for their survival?

It’s really a matter of biting the hand that feeds them, and perhaps it’s our fault that nobody thinks of us, and if they do think of us, they only see us as a threat instead of another important fiber in the fabric of our nation’s society.

READ: Mainstream media slams flyover states as rural voters unite

Advocacy, now more than ever, is incredibly important for rural America’s survival. If we are considered a threat, not an asset, to our nation’s security, what does that mean for our futures in agriculture when the general voting public goes to the polls? What kind of regulations will be shoved down our throats because consumers think they know better than the farmers, ranchers, loggers, electricians, miners, construction crews and other skilled laborers in blue-collared society?

We must continue to tell our story. The gap between big cities and the quiet country may be huge, but if we don’t continue to try to educate, connect and find the gray areas so we can compromise and work together, our future is indeed uncertain. Living in a world where we only see black and white is scary, and we must be part of the solution, for the sake of our nation, our food security and our childrens’ and grandchildrens’ futures.

The opinions of Amanda Radke are not necessarily those of beefmagazine.com or Farm Progress.

 

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The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsThe Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits. Although woven around the experiences and adventures of one man, this is also the story of the people who lived during the period of time in American history that an entire generation was betrayed It is the story of the dramatically changing times in which this personal odyssey took place. It is the story of the betrayal of an entire generation of Americans and particularly the 40% (of the military aged males) of that generation that fought the Vietnam war.

 

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“Sovereign” States or Federal Satrapies?

 I have to ask the question–does the public, ordinary folks, only owning 16% of the state they live in really constitute it being a “sovereign” state, or is it still really a federal territory that has been labeled a state for the sake of convenience (and electoral votes)?

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersAnd they wonder why New Mexico is the poorest “state” in the occupied territories.

We have a word for that down where I come from. We call it “communism.”

 Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual  It pains me to know that the uS government used to pay me to kill communists. Then, I came “home” (to a place I had never been) and found out that they had snuck through the back door and taken over without ever having fired a shot. With reference to Vietnam, my wife once said to me, “You guys were killing the wrong bunch of communists.” — jtl, 419

by Al Benson Jr. via revisedhistory

Member, Board of Directors, Confederate Society of America

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewThere was an article on the Zero Hedge website back on last June 27th, written by Michael Snyder, which had originally appeared on the Economic Collapse blog. It was about how much land the federal government “owns” in our Western states. From the looks of the map that appeared with the article they “own” almost half ot it. The article noted that: “Today, the feds control approximately  640 million acres of land, and after decades of very poor management, many are calling on the states to take a larger role. This is particularly true in the 11 western states where the federal government collectively  owns 47 percent of all the land.”

Combat Shooter's Handbook Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsYep, you read that figure right–47 percent of it all. For instance, in Nevada, the feds “own” 84% of all the land in the state.  That leaves 16% of the state for ordinary folks. The feds “own” 64% of Utah, 61% of both Idaho and Alaska and 52% of Oregon. By the time you get to Wyoming the feds only “own” a measly 48% of the state. What a comedown from Nevada that must be for them!

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2)The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)I have to ask the question–does the public, ordinary folks, only owning 16% of the state they live in really constitute it being a “sovereign” state, or is it still really a federal territory that has been labeled a state for the sake of convenience (and electoral votes)?

Another pertinent question might be, which is more important–who “owns” it or who controls it? If the general public “owns” it  but can’t do much with it, then the federal government that controls  it is the actual de facto owner, isn’t it? It’s somewhat akin to the situation with the property tax that I have written about before on several occasions. You “own” your house and possess a deed with your name on it saying you own it. Yet, if you fail to pay the yearly governmental rent then some unit of government can come and take “your” property and do what they will with it. So, in the long run, who is the real owner–the man with his name on the deed–or the governmental agency that can take it away from him if he doesn’t pay their yearly “rent?” Mostly, we don’t want to think about this kind of thing. We should.

There was an article in the New York Times for August 25th of this year about Trump’a new Secretary of the Interior proposing shrinking of four national monuments in the West–so designated by King Barack the First (and hopefully the last). One of these was the Bears Ears, over west of Blanding, Utah. You can find it on your road atlas. Obama created a national monument there that was 1.35 million acres in size–land locked up so the public could do nothing with it.  Mr. Zinke, Trump’s Secretary of the Interior wants to reduce the Bears Ears monument to 160,000 acres. I hope he makes it, but even 160,000 acres is a lot for a monument with the Bears Ears as its centerpiece.  It’s pretty country there. We’ve been through some of it several times over the years, but it doesn’t rate another 160,000 closed-down acres for a national monument. Cutting it in half and designating half of it for a monument at the Bears Ears would be plenty, but then that wouldn’t give the feds control over all the 1.35 million acres–and control is what they really want. Control in the name of creating new “public’ monuments and “recreation areas” where you can only go if you follow their rules.

The owner of Land & Livestock international (look it up on the internet) has observed that “Transferring these lands to the States would be a great improvement, but would not necessarily be the best ultimate end…These lands need to be returned to their rightful owners (and/or their heirs and assigns)–the families who have 4 or 5 generations of sweat equity in the lands (or those who have rightfully purchased those property rights through  voluntary exchange). I am hopeful but I doubt seriously that we will ever see it happen.”

In the case of some of that “public” land near the Bundy Ranch in Nevada, one might be led to question just how much of this “public” land has been of use to Harry Reid and his son, or to Hillary with her Uranium One deal. Lots of big bucks being made there off some of that land that, we the public, supposedly own.

 

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Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualPlanned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual. This is the ideal squeal to A Handbook for Ranch Managers.  Although the ecological principles remain the same, what was originally known as “The Savory Grazing Method” now answers to a multitude of different names: ranching for profit, holistic management, managed grazing, mob grazing, management intensive grazing, etc. Land & Livestock International, Inc. uses “Restoration Grazing” under its “Managing the Ranch as a Business” program.” No mater what you call it, this summary and synopsis will guide you step by step through the process and teach you how to use it as it was originally intended. No more excuses for failing to complete your grazing plans.

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