National Monuments: Trump & Interior Secretary Clash Over Federal Lands

The president should ignore Ryan Zinke’s recommendations and revoke illegally designated or expanded national monuments.
So has Zinke became a part of the Swamp? — jtl, 419

 

Like a rookie agent in a spy thriller, Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke went rogue in responding to President Trump’s executive order to review and make recommendations regarding the legality of two decades of national-monument decrees whereby past presidents, pursuant to the unilateral authority granted them by the Antiquities Act of 1906, designated federal lands as “national monuments” and, like national parks and wilderness areas, put them largely off limits to economic and recreational uses.

Instead of doing as asked, Secretary Zinke recommended decreasing the size of only four of the most blatantly illegal national monuments while leaving the boundaries of all the others standing with mollycoddle language, which will soon get stricken by environmentalists. Worse, he asked that the president do as Clinton and Obama did before him: that is, designate as national monuments federal lands that do not qualify under the Antiquities Act, including, in a surprisingly questionable case of special pleading, one in his home state of Montana. If President Trump does not heed his own pugnacious and not Zinke’s pusillanimous counsel, the matter will be up to the entity entrusted by the Constitution with management of federal lands: Congress. That is as it should be, but whether Congress is up to the task is doubtful, given not just the past nine months but the last 107 years.

On April 26, 2017, President Trump issued his “Presidential Executive Order [13792] on the Review of Designations Under the Antiquities Act,” providing that his secretary of the interior “shall conduct a review of all Presidential designations or expansions of designations under the Antiquities Act made since January 1, 1996.” The review must include monuments that cover over 100,000 acres, either when first designated or after subsequent expansion, as well as those where “the designation or expansion was made without adequate public outreach and coordination with relevant stakeholders.” In so doing, the secretary must determine if the designations or expansions were “in accordance with the requirements and original objectives of the [Antiquities] Act,” which are set out in President Trump’s order. He was wise to do so, given the degree to which the law was abused by President Carter, but even more egregiously by President Clinton, and worst of all, by President Obama.

The Antiquities Act of 1906, which all three presidents cited as purported authority for their expansive decrees, was never intended for the purposes to which it was put for the past 21 years. Instead, Congress sought to protect “historic landmarks, historic and prehistoric structures, and other objects of historic or scientific interest,” what the House of Representatives report called “interesting relics [‘ruins’] of prehistoric times” that are “scattered throughout the [American] Southwest [on] public lands.” In the draft legislation, designations were limited to “320 to 640” acres, but the Act provided for “the smallest area compatible with the proper care and management of the objects to be protected.” As early as 1911, however, federal officials resisted efforts by “patriotic and public-spirited citizens” to designate monuments for “scenery alone,” because the Act does “not specify scenery, nor remotely refer to scenery as a possible raison d’être for a public reservation.” (See my book Warriors for the West: Fighting Bureaucrats, Radical Groups, and Liberal Judges on America’s Frontier, pages 66–67, and endnotes.)

Presidents Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin Roosevelt, and Jimmy Carter exceeded their statutory authority in frequent uses of the Act, but their actions, some of which were modified by later presidents or made the subject of congressional designations, occurred before public-land law’s modern era. That began in 1976 with passage of a federal law by which Congress reasserted its exclusive authority over federal land. Thereafter followed decades of laws by which Congress provided for the protection of “wild and scenic rivers,” “wilderness areas,” “endangered or threatened species,” and other concerns, each of which required an act of Congress and signature by the president. Congress left the Antiquities Act standing, theoretically limited to its original purpose, and that is the way it was viewed by Presidents Reagan and George H. W. Bush, who issued no decrees.

Not so Clinton, who among his many Antiquities Act edicts closed one of the world’s best low-sulfur coal deposits — its mining would create 1,000 local jobs and generate $20 million annually — with the Escalante-Grand Staircase National Monument. So passionate was Utah’s opposition to the monument that Clinton deceived political leaders — but not Robert Redford — about his plan until he announced it at Arizona’s Grand Canyon. Today, Garfield County is a self-declared “economic disaster” area.

Likewise, Obama ignored unanimous state and local opposition in Maine and used the Act to designate 87,654 acres purchased for the National Park Service (NPS) as a “seed” for the NPS’s 1988 plan for a 3.2 million–acre park, contrary to a 1998 federal law requiring that Congress authorize all new park-suitability studies. Finally, in a belated Christmas gift to Leonardo DiCaprio and other environmental extremists, Obama thumbed his nose at Utahans with his 1.35 million–acre Bears Ears National Monument in San Juan County. That is not all. Elsewhere, as New Mexican and Reagan-administration alumnus Frank DuBois observes, the Obama administration, instead of designating the “smallest area” possible around “the objects to be protected,” drew a boundary that replicated, for example, a series of wilderness areas Congress refused to designate, and then populated it with purportedly qualifying objects.

Secretary Zinke announced a formal comment period regarding his review on May 5, 2017, which closed on July 10, 2017, with the receipt of 2.8 million comments, both via mail and electronically. Secretary Zinke visited eight monuments in six states and held dozens of meetings with officials, organizations, and locals. His undated report to President Trump was leaked to the Washington Post, which published on it on September 18. To his credit, he acknowledges that past administrations played fast and loose with the law. A sample of his findings:

“Objects are not consistently and clearly defined,” including “geographic areas, ‘viewsheds,’ and ‘ecosystems.’”

“Boundaries mirror[ed] the previously proposed legislative boundaries,” which had been rejected by Congress, “that were not developed with the Act initially in mind.”

“Traditional uses of the land such as grazing, timber production, mining, fishing, hunting, recreation, and other[s] are unnecessarily restricted . . . by designating geographic landscape areas as objects of historic or scientific interest….”

“Certain monuments were designated to prevent economic activity such as grazing, mining, and timber production rather than to protect specific objects.”

Notwithstanding this list of violations, Secretary Zinke failed to recommend that President Trump vacate any of them. That President Trump has the authority to do so is without question. Just as no Congress can bind a future one, no president through a unilateral decree can claim to rule forever. That it will be fought aggressively by environmentalists means only that the solicitor general must defend the revocations before the Supreme Court of the United States. He should; it is the right thing to do. It will restore the rule of law.

Secretary Zinke has failed to recognize that the Antiquities Act long ago outlived its usefulness even while it remains capable of massive and malevolent misapplication.


Secretary Zinke does recommend indeterminate revisions in the boundaries of Utah’s Grand Staircase-Escalante and Bears Ears national monuments — the Beehive State is united in its vociferous opposition — and Oregon’s Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument, the expansion of which is in litigation by affected counties and timber producers. (He also recommended a boundary adjustment for a marine national monument in the Pacific.) Remarkably, he made no such recommendation for a boundary adjustment of the Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument in Maine despite the vigorous opposition of Governor Paul R. LePage and affected locals. Instead, Zinke recommends only amending the original proclamation “to promote a healthy forest through active timber management.” Environmentalists have already promised a lawsuit to kill even that measly half-loaf. Likewise, as to some of the other 22 designations or expansions reviewed, Zinke recommends that proclamations be amended to remove the worst aspects of the abusive decrees. If this is an attempt to placate environmentalists, who, for example, filed 260,000 comments from Maine, it will not. Remember, the Women’s March against President Trump was cosponsored by the Natural Resources Defense Council.

Sadly, after setting forth the abuses to which the Act has been put over the decades, and cognizant — not only as the secretary of the interior but also as the representative for all of Montana in the U.S. House — of the vast changes in federal land law since 1906, he failed to recognize that the Antiquities Act long ago outlived its usefulness even while it remains capable of massive and malevolent misapplication. Incredibly, instead of calling for its repeal, he recommends its use for a Union Army camp in Kentucky, civil-rights sites throughout the South, and a portion of a multiple-use national forest in his backyard in Montana where an American Indian tribe seeks to prevent the owner of an oil and gas lease issued by the Reagan administration from drilling on his property. (Full disclosure: The outfit I lead represents the man and his company in a lawsuit against the Obama administration and now Secretary Zinke.) Secretary Zinke knows that there are ways to recognize Union Army camps, that the civil-rights site is already a National Historical Landmark, and that decades of environmental and antiquities laws provide a process that ensures that any oil and gas drilling preserves the environment and archeological sites.

President Trump should reject Secretary Zinke’s recommendations; order preparation of new proclamations to revoke illegally designated or expanded monuments, to shrink them to legal size, or to provide them with bullet-proof language that preserves local economic and recreational use; and ask Congress to repeal the Antiquities Act to end forever the threat of mischief against rural communities. If he does not, Congress must fulfill its duty under the Property Clause (“make all needful Rules and Regulations respecting . . . Property belonging to the United States”) and defer no more to the detriment of those who sent them to Washington. Congress has been feckless in performing its duties, not just for the last nine months but ever since 1910 when the Supreme Court ruled that it had acquiesced in its constitutional obligation as to federal lands and could not object to its usurpation by the executive. Let us hope that either President Trump or Congress rises to the occasion.

 

— William Perry Pendley, an attorney is president of Mountain States Legal Foundation in Denver and the author of Sagebrush Rebel: Reagan’s Battle with Environmental Extremists and Why It Matters Today.

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Dripping Springs
Mule Creek, Grant County, New Mexico

The Dripping Springs Ranch is a highly improved working cattle ranch in a very desirable part of southwest New Mexico. Access to the Ranch from State Route 78 is excellent, and it is an easy drive to either Silver City, N. or Safford, Az. 232 deeded acres, 13,000 USFS acres, 150 AU. $2,500,000

Walking L Ranch
Wickenburg, Yavapai County

The Walking L Ranch’s 52+ square miles adjoin Wickenburg from the Hassayamapa River into the Wickenburg Mountains. The ranch originally consisted of the 10X Ranch on the south end and the Rincon Ranch on the north end.  The old Rincon Dude Ranch was added to the ranch’s Headquarters by the current owner. The ranch’s land tenure consists of deeded land, State and BLM Grazing Leases.  Topography is rolling to steep with elevation’s ranging from 2,100’ along the river to over 2,700’ on San Domingo Peak.  The ranch borders US 60 on the south side of Wickenburg.  The ranch’s deeded land is in seven non-contiguous parcels throughout the ranch.  The headquarters consists of 110.88 deeded acres on Rincon Road and the Hassayampa River with approximately 30 acres irrigated.  Another headquarters for the 10X is on the state lease. $5,000,000

Dos S Inholding
Fountain Hills, Maricopa County

The Dos S is a 22.78 acre private inholding surrounded by Tonto National Forest on Sycamore Creek.  It is located just off the Beeline Highway behind a locked gate 20 miles from the Shea Boulevard & Highway 87 intersection at Fountain Hills.  Payson is 40 miles to the north. $1,025,100

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Forced to Farm? California Lawsuit Raises Question

Straight out of the playbook of the Third World Banana Republic. I don’t know how it is now, but some years back, if you owned a farm in Honduras and did not farm it, they would take it away from you and give it to a horde of squatters.  That, quite logically, lead to absentee owners planting crops and then never tending to them–just so they could keep the land. — jtl, 419
via AgWeb

 

A new lawsuit in California is asking the question if county government can force producers to keep farming in order to keep your own land.

The Pacific Legal Foundation is stepping in to defend Willie Benedetti, owner of Benedetti Farms and Wille Bird Turkeys.

He wants to build a house on his land for his son, but Marin County’s new land use plan requires landowners who currently use their land for agricultural purposes to remain “actively and directly engaged” in agriculture in perpetuity.

For Benedetti, that would mean he must choose between working forever or retiring and giving up his property. He is suing the county and the California Coastal Commission for this unconstitutional condition on his right to use his property.

“We’re not talking about environmental issues—we’re talking about building a house, and then I have to stay in agriculture to see that it will get done,” said Benedetti.

Litigation is ongoing in the Marin County Superior Court.

A Handbook for Ranch Managers Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View Combat Shooter's Handbook Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) 

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Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualPlanned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual. This is the ideal squeal to A Handbook for Ranch Managers.  Although the ecological principles remain the same, what was originally known as “The Savory Grazing Method” now answers to a multitude of different names: ranching for profit, holistic management, managed grazing, mob grazing, management intensive grazing, etc. Land & Livestock International, Inc. uses “Restoration Grazing” under its “Managing the Ranch as a Business” program.” No mater what you call it, this summary and synopsis will guide you step by step through the process and teach you how to use it as it was originally intended. No more excuses for failing to complete your grazing plans.

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Don’t let fake narrative block Monuments review

A skewed conception of monuments has developed. The Antiquities Act was intended to protect things like archaeological sites and geological formations. It was never intended to encompass vast swathes of land.

 

A Handbook for Ranch Managers

Yep, just another FedGov land grab driven by radical environmentalists (a branch of the  Cultural Marxist Army) agenda.  — jtl, 419

 

by CHUCK DENOWH at The Independent Record

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual  Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke has made an admirable attempt to solicit input from Montanans about how National Monuments have affected our state. It’s unfortunate that effort has been drowned out by fake advertisements aimed at misleading Montanans and funded by out-of-state environmental groups.

Opposition to the Monuments review centers on the ridiculous claim that it will result in the federal government selling federal land to private entities. Not only is that the direct opposite of Secretary Zinke’s stated objective, it’s illegal for the federal government to sell public land.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewYet we hear over and over again that the Trump administration has some secret plan to sell lands currently in National Monuments. It’s a fake narrative designed to avoid having a real conversation about the impact monuments have had in Montana and other states.

One of the red flags that prompted the Monument review by Secretary Zinke was the sheer scope of land that has been encompassed using the Antiquities Act, which has included hundreds of thousands of acres of private land. It’s clear from the language of the Antiquities Acts itself that it was never intended to be the vehicle for a government land grab.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Antiquities Act also requires that monuments be limited to things like “historic landmarks, and “historic or prehistoric structures”. The Act also limits designations to Federal lands and requires that the size of the monument be “the smallest area compatible with proper care and management of the objects.”

It is obvious these statutory limitations have been flagrantly ignored over the last twenty years. Since 1996, presidents have used the Act to create 26 monuments larger than 100,000 acres. These 26 monuments aren’t restricted to existing Federal lands—in all cases private lands have been swept up in these massive monument designations.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) A skewed conception of monuments has developed. The Antiquities Act was intended to protect things like archaeological sites and geological formations. It was never intended to encompass vast swathes of land.

The most notorious example is the Missouri Breaks Monument, which sweeps around and isolates over 80,000 acres of private land. The Breaks monument designation didn’t provide any new protections for the Missouri River, which was already protected with a Wild and Scenic River designation—this designation was simply a flagrant land grab.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)Farmers and ranchers who’ve had their property engulfed by Presidential decree have seen new restrictions that negatively affect their property and offensive intrusions by federal regulators. These landowners live with the ominous knowledge that the federal government has its sights set on one day acquiring their land that lies within the Monument boundaries.

Hunters, anglers, and other outdoor recreationalists have seen a reduction in access to public land with monument designations. Claims that there is somehow an uptick in tourism after a monument designation are also fake—the public land was already there, now it’s just harder to get to. Over 200 miles of public roads have been closed in the Missouri Breaks monument alone.

These are the type of negative Monument impacts Director Zinke was attempting to review. Apparently, it’s worth an awful lot to out-of-state environmental groups to stop that conversation from happening—they spent millions on fake advertising to stop it from happening.

In his summary report to the President, Secretary Zinke summed things up nicely: “No President should use the authority under the Act to restrict public access, prevent hunting and fishing, burden private land, or eliminate traditional land uses.” It’s time to return to that standard.

 

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A Handbook for Ranch ManagersA Handbook for Ranch Managers.  In keeping with the “holistic” idea that the land, the livestock, the people and the money should be viewed as a single integrated whole: Part I deals with the management of the natural resources. Part II covers livestock production and Part III deals with the people and the money. Not only would this book make an excellent basic text for a university program in Ranch Management, no professional ranch manager’s reference bookshelf should be without it. It is a comprehensive reference manual for managing the working ranch. The information in the appendices and extensive bibliography alone is worth the price of the book.

You might also be interested in the supplement to this Handbook: Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual.

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Border ranchers, in a world without a wall

 

Land of Shadows

Sometimes, the border ranchers hear the horses whinny and see shadows moving silently past the barn. Or they ride over a ridge and stumble into cartel “drug mules” carrying pot stuffed in backpacks.

After more than a decade of outrage about border security, cattlemen and -women in the thorny southern Arizona outback have grown tired of recounting the memories. Fences and irrigation lines cut. Homes and sheds broken into. One of their own murdered in cold blood.

But in this land of dust and shadows, what most weighs on ranchers is not just what’s seen, but what’s unseen. The atrocities of years past, gone but not forgotten.

And just south of these ranches, on an imaginary boundary, a border wall that doesn’t yet exist.

A U.S.-Mexico border wall will impede imports that Americans take for granted. And costs will likely rise.

Ranchers: Violence on the land : Cattle ranchers along Arizona’s southern border have had serious issues with criminal border crossers. (USA TODAY NETWORK)
Rounding up: Reed Thwaits ropes a calf at Atascosa Ranch in Santa Cruz County, Arizona. (Nick Oza/USA TODAY NETWORK)

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Ranching is a heritage of land, a family legacy, a lifestyle. It’s a cycle of fence mending, cactus dodging and calf branding, measured by sweat and blisters.

Most families have been at it more than a century, isolated in wild, lonely, peaceful country with only the buzzing of flies and the bawling of calves.

These operations today run about 150,000 head of cattle in southern Arizona, an $18 million economic driver in Cochise County alone. Ranches and grazing leases account for much of the land area, and lifestyle.

The Ladd family’s San Jose Ranch started up when Pancho Villa’s revolutionaries marauded along the border.

More than 120 years later, John Ladd runs cattle there, along 10 miles of border in Cochise County. He recalls a time when nearly all of the locals employed Mexican cowboys. “We had Loreto,” he says. “My dad sponsored him for citizenship, and always kidded that he was my brother.”

At a ranch near Nogales, Robert Noon offers a similar memory: “You had your wetbacks coming across,” he says, seemingly unaware that, for some, the word cuts like barbed wire. “They were actually looking for a job — not a handout. We’d give ’em a peanut butter and jelly sandwich and they were on their way.”

During the 1980s, perhaps 300 border crossers would pass through a ranch each month. They were meek and respectful, begging for water before heading north.

Security system: Safety is not an abstract concept for David Lowell, owner of Atascosa Ranch, where there have been break-ins and shootouts involving cartels and bandits. Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry was murdered on his land. (Nick Oza/USA TODAY NETWORK)
Border ranchers: Cochise County Sheriff’s Deputy Mike Magoffin eyes the international border in Arizona about six miles from the New Mexico state line. (Michael Chow/USA TODAY NETWORK)

$1 billion

The Border Patrol budget in 2000

$3.6 billion

The Border Patrol budget in 2016

And then the borderland slowly turned to hell.

In the ’90s, Ladd says, 300 migrants were crossing his land daily.

By the early 2000s, a boom was underway. More migrants, more border patrol, more fences.

Under the George W. Bush and Obama administrations, the U.S. Border Patrol nearly doubled the number of agents working on the southwestern border to over 17,000.

The Border Patrol budget has more than tripled, from $1 billion in 2000 to $3.6 billion last year. Beginning in 2006 under the Secure Fence Act of 2006, the government also built about 700 miles of pedestrian and vehicle barriers. Obama’s administration also added millions of dollars worth of motion sensors, trail cameras, flood lights and other technology collectively described as a “virtual fence.”

But, because agents mostly patrolled many miles north of the Mexican boundary, ranches remained a no-man’s land where rival cartels and banditos waged war.

On his ranch near Rio Rico, David Lowell drew a “Map of Atrocities” to keep track of where shootouts occurred and bodies were found.

Then came the atrocities of 2010.

To the east, past Ladd’s spread, a rancher named Robert Krentz was killed. Authorities followed tracks from the murder site to the border, where they lost the trail. Officially, the killer has never been identified.

And to the west, in the backcountry of Lowell’s ranch, Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry was cut down in a gunfight with bandits.

Today, there’s a monument to Terry in the remote, tangled canyon where he died.

It is, in essence, a private memorial — almost impossible to find or access. Like so many pieces of the border story, it remains unseen.

Deputy Mike Magoffin heads east out of Douglas, Arizona, his head on a swivel.

Magoffin stops to inspect footprints across the border road. The tracks are a day old, so he moves on.

Magoffin’s a deer hunter, and tracking smugglers or immigrants involves the same skill set and adrenaline. “It’s OK,” he adds, “as long as it doesn’t extrapolate into pulling the trigger.”

The radio picks up occasional chatter among Border Patrol agents. No word of immigrants or drug runners.

Magoffin pulls out binoculars and points to a boulder-strewn bluff on the Mexican side — a smuggler’s lookout post.

“I’m 100 percent certain we’re being watched right now by someone affiliated with the cartel,” he says.

He just can’t see them.

Magoffin is on ranch patrol. When things got bad on the border, the Cochise County Sheriff’s Office created a team of deputies to help cattle growers deal with the immigrants, smugglers and Border Patrol.

For 25 miles, fencing is variable. Some areas are guarded by an 18-foot bollard-style barricade; others have only Normandy vehicle barriers. Magoffin steps up to the more imposing fence, scales it in a matter of seconds, then jumps back to earth.

The road ends atop a hill near the Mafioso Trail. From that point for 20 miles, the United States and Mexico are separated only by barbed wire.

IN THEIR WORDS

“Enforce our immigration laws first. Put Border Patrol agents in sight of one another. If you have line of sight, you don’t need a wall.”

John Ladd, Rancher

“It won’t really matter. They (immigrants) will still come here. They’ll still climb it or go around it to find jobs.”

Manuel Solomon, a 71-year-old caballero

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Magoffin says this is probably the hottest smuggling zone. He dramatically peers in all directions, seeing no one. “It’s because of all the Border Patrol presence,” he says, sarcastically. Agents are rarely spotted. “We haven’t seen one since the Slaughter Ranch, about 40 minutes ago.”

Reminded that the number of agents roughly doubled during the past decade, Magoffin nods. “There may be more back at the station,” he allows, “but out here? It doesn’t look like it.”

Ranchers down here will tell you they despised the Obama administration, and helped vote Donald Trump into the White House.

Yet a funny thing happens when you ask them about the president’s famous promise of a “tall, powerful, beautiful” border wall.

Almost unanimously, they think it’s bad idea.

Ladd, a cowboy who looks like the Marlboro man and runs cattle along 10 miles of border in Cochise County: “Enforce our immigration laws first. Put Border Patrol agents in sight of one another (along the international line). If you have line of sight, you don’t need a wall.”

Manuel Solomon, a 71-year-old caballero, who has just finished castrating and branding calves near Rio Rico: “It won’t really matter. They (immigrants) will still come here. They’ll still climb it or go around it to find jobs.”

Noon, who works a couple cow-calf operations outside Nogales: “A wall is a wall. It’s going to stop some traffic, but they’ll find a way around it. … In the long term? It’s a major waste of money. And it’s kind of ludicrous to think Mexicans will pay for it.”

1 of 23

Border ranches

These ranches have often been the sites of migrant crossings.

Source: maps4news.com

David Lowell, a rancher who also has a degree in mine engineering, estimates that a three-story concrete wall might eliminate 80 percent of the illegal traffic, adding, “That would be all to the good as far as we’re concerned.”

On the other hand, Lowell says, a barrier like the communist regime erected in East Berlin might work much better: “It would be two, sturdy, razor-wire fences with electrical currents and a road between them.”

“The wall without the agents won’t do anything,” Magoffin says. “If you tell me, ‘Everything you want is on the other side of the wall and I won’t look,’ I’m going over that wall.”

Ladd concedes that today’s rancher outrage is aimed mostly at how things used to be, not how they are.

Ladd has not seen migrants on the property since Christmas. No smugglers’ vehicles have come through in 18 months.

In fact, illegal immigration has been plummeting for years. Border Patrol data show 54,891 people were apprehended in southern Arizona’s Tucson Sector in 2016 — about one-tenth the number captured in 2000.

An even sharper decline this year has been attributed, at least in part, to prospective immigrant fears after President Donald Trump took office and signed executive orders to start planning for the wall. Overall apprehensions dropped by two-thirds in April.

Drive the border anywhere in this region and the story is the same. Rancher frustration is still real, palpable, even now that few crossers are around to be seen.

Walking the line: John Ladd walks along an 18-foot-tall section of the border fence. He says he hasn’t seen migrants on his property since Christmas 2016, and it’s been even longer since there was a sighting of a smuggler’s vehicle. (Michael Chow/USA TODAY NETWORK)
Border Q&A

Who will build the border wall, and what will it look like?

U.S. Customs and Border Protection issued two separate calls for bids to design and build prototypes of the border wall. One was for a concrete wall (the requirement of “see-through features” was added to this request). The other was for “alternate materials” designs, which might mean metal fencing. More than 200 U.S. companies submitted proposals.

Ladd hops in an old, red pickup truck and churns a 3-mile trail of dust to newly installed border fence. Thick metal slats, 18 feet high, are emblazoned with the words “Korean Steel.”

“This is probably 90 percent effective,” Ladd says. “It’s the best I’ve seen as far as design.”

A brisk wind blows from Sonora, making a “shwoooo” sound as it crosses through fencing and into the United States.

“That’s a wonderful sound,” Ladd says, smiling.

But in the wind is the whisper of the past, invisible but inescapable.

On Lowell’s ranch, cowhand Reed Thwaits maneuvers a Jeep over steep, rutted roads until he finally reaches a cattle tank and a giant mesquite.

This, he explains softly, is a so-called “rape tree.” It was once adorned with women’s bras and underwear. Coyotes would sexually assault some of the female migrants who hired them, leaving undergarments in the branches as trophies.

Amnesty International and other groups have concluded, based on interviews with migrants and health workers, that of female Central American migrants headed to the U.S., 60 percent or more are sexually assaulted.

The idea of specific rape trees is laced through ranchland lore, each one as universal as it is unverifiable.

Thwaits shakes his head. “Not a safe place to be … I’ve seen (immigrant) women crying like they had been raped, abused.”

There is nothing on this tree today — no underwear, no marker. There’s no easy documentation about this spot on the Map of Atrocities.

But the tree, and the land where it grows, remains draped with the power of the unseen.

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Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewIn return, he/she takes care of the logistics involved in putting on the event. This includes arranging for the venue, booking a block of rooms for lodging, arranging for meals (if any), putting out the advertising, setting and collecting the fees and so forth.

We are then responsible for putting on the workshop.

During the interim we will each keep track of our out of pocket costs (from our end, that will be mostly travel and lodging). Then, when it is all over, we both are reimbursed our out of pocket costs and split any funds remaining 50:50.

If this sounds like something you might be interested in, click here and let us know. If the link won’t work for you, copy and paste info@landandlivestockinternational.com into your browser.

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Chihuahuas and Keyline

“Chichuahuas and Keyline” explains Chocolate the Keyline Dog’s take on contour subsoil plowing.

A Handbook for Ranch Managers Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View Combat Shooter's Handbook Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)

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Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View

edited by

Dr Jimmy T (Gunny) LaBaume

Is now available in both PAPERBACK and Kindle

BookCoverImageMurray N. Rothbard was the father of what some call Radical Libertarianism or Anarcho-Capitalism which Hans-Hermann Hoppe described as “Rothbard’s unique contribution to the rediscovery of property and property rights as the common foundation of both economics and political philosophy, and the systematic reconstruction and conceptual integration of modern, marginalist economics and natural-law political philosophy into a unified moral science: libertarianism.”

This book applies the principles of this “unified moral science” to environmental and natural resource management issues.

The book started out life as an assigned reading list for a university level course entitled Environmental and Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View.

As I began to prepare to teach the course, I quickly saw that there was a plethora of textbooks suitable for universal level courses dealing with environmental and natural resource economics. The only problem was that they were all based in mainstream neo-classical (or Keynesian) theory. I could find no single collection of material comprising a comprehensive treatment of environmental and natural resource economics based on Austrian Economic Theory.

However, I was able to find a large number of essays, monographs, papers delivered at professional meetings and published from a multitude of sources. This book is the result. It is composed of a collection of research reports and essays by reputable scientists, economists, and legal experts as well as private property and free market activists.

The book is organized into seven parts: I. Environmentalism: The New State Religion; II. The New State Religion Debunked; III. Introduction to Environmental and Natural Resource Economics; IV. Interventionism: Law and Regulation; V. Pollution and Recycling; VI. Property Rights: Planning, Zoning and Eminent Domain; and VII. Free Market Conservation. It also includes an elaborate Bibliography, References and Recommended Reading section including an extensive Annotated Bibliography of related and works on the subject.

The intellectual level of the individual works ranges from quite scholarly to informed editorial opinion.

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What is land for?

Straight from the hip with Brenda Schoepp

Photo: Canada Beef Inc.

It started as a potential narrative for agricultural peril with the question: “What is land for?” That got my attention and I was fostering the dismal thought of a counter defence. But the context of the question had deeper meaning. What will land be for?

Throughout history land has been fought for, won and lost as territory or domain. It rarely was kept strictly as a source of food production, (it didn’t matter if the poor were hungry). It has been one man’s or one county’s measure of wealth. The drawing of borders was a compromise often based on port access and elements of controlling transportation, population movement, politics, religion, precious metals and gems, and economic status.

As we face intensification over land issues, the conversation has shifted to what is termed as “sustainable intensification.” This, in my opinion, is entirely possible for the short term, but does not address the future. We can sustain green spaces, recycle, reduce waste, build up rather than out, provide food spaces and use food waste for fuel but that is only part of the cycle. Cities, burned out fields, land areas filled with bombs, deathly chemical residue from other industry, and dried aquifers all have one commonality: they can be intensely sustained but they cannot regenerate. And it is in regeneration, not in sustainability, where our future lies.

While every industry jumps on the sustainability bandwagon, there are a few visionaries of the future who see the world through a different lens. They understand soil must regenerate, not simply sustain. They understand air must regenerate, not sustain. They get that regardless of how we stock our oceans or clean our waters, a sea of plastic residue out there will keep the process sustainable but never regenerative.

Take a field of alfalfa. It sustains when we add fertilizer and that can be intensified. It regenerates when it has complementary species to hold the moisture to feed its amazing root, which can be tap or creeping, depending on the variety. These complementary friends slow the runoff and keep the soil cool. Its beautiful bloom is like a cluster of orchids and is a bit intimidating for honey bees but leaf cutter bees are great assets to the pollination process. Protection from wind that stresses the plant can be found in shelterbelts that are strategic in their location. This plant has an extraordinary life span when it is part of an ecosystem. It has a shorter life span when it is just sustained.

And in genetics, as we continue to eliminate outliers, single trait select, reduce seed varieties and foster co-dependency on single sources of life, we may intensely sustain agriculture but that is not regeneration.

In many European countries, even deeded farmland is open to the public. Access for the purpose of education or relaxation is deemed a public right in some countries while in others there is little or no access to private lands. The question becomes: which is the greater contributor to the health of a nation? The no trespassing sign that is nailed to the gate or the sign that says all are welcome, please report in for your safety and comfort? I cannot judge either way but am certain that if it were put to a public vote, reasonable access to land for the enjoyment of it, for healing or for the participation in viewing the story of food, would win over the idea that all people must stay out at all times.

So back to the question of what is land for? Urban sprawl has suffocated the highly productive lands as civilizations begin where there is food, water and access to the sea. The idea that fertile land fed our ancestors is only partly true as trade was the dominating factor. As we spread agricultural production into regions farther from urban centres, the soil changes and its lifespan is shorter if sustained. Regeneration is foundational.

What will land be for? The enjoyment of the public, waste disposal, trading pieces in the game of economic or political gain, food production, recreation, weapons, military testing, prisoners, wildlife, resource development, sequestering plants or government hoarding? If these seem unlikely, read the history books and how land and its borders were used to ensure economic power. Remember the walls that were built and the turmoil that creates to this day. Consider Canada’s arable acreage of under five per cent and ask yourself if that should be sustained or regenerated. And finally, imagine how your farm or ranch would adapt to public access.

I have said that even those who grow food on their balcony are also a part of agriculture. Not once has a farming audience agreed with that statement. Holding an elitist view without regard for the ecosystem in which we farm or ranch, only ensures that food production remains sustainable. By closing the door to the art of land regeneration and all the possibilities when one engages with someone outside of industry, we ensure our certain demise. Sharing our values is as important as protecting them. I would want for folks to grow their own food and to enjoy the process. Think of it this way, if there is ever an interruption in food delivery or transportation systems, those urban persons you love will go hungry.

This is not a narrative for agricultural peril but an invitation to think about the possible within and beyond the borders on our land: an invitation to bury our sustainable practices and revitalize our food production culture with regenerative systems.

Land and Livestock International, Inc. is in a position to assist the buyer in purchasing ranches like these anywhere in the Western United States and Northern Mexico. Pre – purchase services include help with due diligence, estimates of carrying capacity and potential for improvement, cash flow projections, etc. Post purchase services include everything from part time consulting to complete turn-key management.

Contact us at info@landandlivestockinternational.com or through our web site at www.landandlivestockinternational.com

Dripping Springs
Mule Creek, Grant County, New Mexico

The Dripping Springs Ranch is a highly improved working cattle ranch in a very desirable part of southwest New Mexico. Access to the Ranch from State Route 78 is excellent, and it is an easy drive to either Silver City, N. or Safford, Az. 232 deeded acres, 13,000 USFS acres, 150 AU. $2,500,000

Walking L Ranch
Wickenburg, Yavapai County

The Walking L Ranch’s 52+ square miles adjoin Wickenburg from the Hassayamapa River into the Wickenburg Mountains. The ranch originally consisted of the 10X Ranch on the south end and the Rincon Ranch on the north end.  The old Rincon Dude Ranch was added to the ranch’s Headquarters by the current owner. The ranch’s land tenure consists of deeded land, State and BLM Grazing Leases.  Topography is rolling to steep with elevation’s ranging from 2,100’ along the river to over 2,700’ on San Domingo Peak.  The ranch borders US 60 on the south side of Wickenburg.  The ranch’s deeded land is in seven non-contiguous parcels throughout the ranch.  The headquarters consists of 110.88 deeded acres on Rincon Road and the Hassayampa River with approximately 30 acres irrigated.  Another headquarters for the 10X is on the state lease. $5,000,000

Dos S Inholding
Fountain Hills, Maricopa County

The Dos S is a 22.78 acre private inholding surrounded by Tonto National Forest on Sycamore Creek.  It is located just off the Beeline Highway behind a locked gate 20 miles from the Shea Boulevard & Highway 87 intersection at Fountain Hills.  Payson is 40 miles to the north. $1,025,100

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Brazilian Authorities Arrest JBS CEO Batista for Insider Trading

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersIn a free society, there would be no such thing as laws against so-called insider trading.

If you don’t believe or understand that, go to https://mises.org/ and in the little box in the upper right corner of the page, search “insider trading.” I count at least 10 good articles authored by Austrian School economists. — jtl, 419

For the second time this week a member of the Batista family, owners of the world’s largest meat packing company, has been arrested in Brazil.
For the second time this week a member of the Batista family, owners of the world’s largest meat packing company, has been arrested in Brazil.

 Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual Wesley Batista, the chief executive officer and co-owner of JBS, has been detained by Brazil’s federal police on charges of insider trading. The arrest was made in conjunction with an investigation of suspected insider trading by both Wesley and his brother Joesley, prior to a plea deal they had arranged in May for their involvement in political bribes.

Earlier this week Joesley turned himself into federal authorities in Brazil when an order for his arrest was made by the Supreme Court. Joesley is accused of withholding information from prosecutors and taking advantage of them during the peal deal negotiations. These are charges he has denied.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewThe arrests of the brothers has been confirmed by JBS and the brother’s lawyer Pierpaolo Bottini. A statement has not been released by JBS, but Bottini has called the arrests “unjust, absurd and regrettable.”

Trades were allegedly made by the Batista brothers prior to their plea deal. Following the announcement of the plea deal there was the largest selloff on Brazil’s stock exchange in more than a decade.

Combat Shooter's HandbookReuters reports from a source who was asking to stay anonymous, that investigators suspect the brothers gained an unfair advantage in trading shares of JBS. During April and May the Batistas were aiding the company in building an abnormal position through trades in currency futures and forwards.

Both brothers had resigned from positions on the JBS board of directors following their admission to bribery of politicians in the plea deal. There are reports that minority shareholders would like to have Wesley removed from his CEO position because he allegedly withheld information from authorities in the plea deal, as well.

Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute Two additional detention orders were issued against executives at the Batista family-owned FB Participações SA and JBS, according to Brazilian police.

A police statement says the orders were placed because they “manipulated markets in a way that all shareholders incurred some of the losses that FB Participações would have otherwise had to absorb alone.”

The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsJBS was started in 1953 by the brother’s father José Batista Sobrinho (his initials are where the name comes from) in Brazil, where he processed just five head of cattle per day. The company has since grown to have a global footprint with packing plants in Australia, Europe, North America and South America, producing meat sold to more than 105 countries.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)In the U.S. JBS owns the following holdings:

  • Eight beef processing plants
  • Five pork processing plants
  • 28 poultry processing plants (Pilgrim’s Pride)
  • 12 feedlots (JBS Five Rivers), which are currently for sale
Click the map to visit JBS USA’s homepage and view the interactive map of JBS’s North American operations.

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Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualPlanned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual. This is the ideal squeal to A Handbook for Ranch Managers.  Although the ecological principles remain the same, what was originally known as “The Savory Grazing Method” now answers to a multitude of different names: ranching for profit, holistic management, managed grazing, mob grazing, management intensive grazing, etc. Land & Livestock International, Inc. uses “Restoration Grazing” under its “Managing the Ranch as a Business” program.” No mater what you call it, this summary and synopsis will guide you step by step through the process and teach you how to use it as it was originally intended. No more excuses for failing to complete your grazing plans.

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No, hurricanes aren’t more frequent or severe

Source: No, hurricanes aren’t more frequent or severe

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Blame for Disaster

…when Donald Trump joked about a lack of warming on a snowy day, they lectured us about how “weather is not climate — one snow storm is irrelevant to long-term climate.” They were right then. But now that bad weather has come, they change their tune.

A Handbook for Ranch Managers

“Anyone who believes there’s no such thing as global warming must be blind or unintelligent, Lord, please save us all,” Steve Wonder last night on the Hollywood-studded hurricane relief telethon.  I immediately changed the channel and hope you did too. — jtl, 419

Blame for Disaster

“How many once-in-a-lifetime storms will it take,” demands “The Daily Show” comic Trevor Noah, “until everyone admits man-made climate change is real?!”

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)    His audience roars its approval.

When Hurricane Irma hit, so-called friends admonished me, “Look what your fossil fuels have done! Will you finally admit you are wrong?”

The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2)No. It’s the alarmists who are wrong — on so many levels.

First, two big storms don’t mean much.

The global warming activists must know that because when Donald Trump joked about a lack of warming on a snowy day, they lectured us about how “weather is not climate — one snow storm is irrelevant to long-term climate.”

They were right then. But now that bad weather has come, they change their The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)tune.

Time magazine reported confidently, “Climate change makes the hurricane season worse.”

But Irma and Harvey came after a record 12 years without any Category 3-5 storms. Over those 12 years, did Time say the absence of storms proved climate change fear exaggerated? No. Of course not.

Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits Combat Shooter's HandbookIt seems logical that warmer water may make storms worse, but there’s no proof of that.

The government’s own National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says neither its models “nor our analyses of trends in Atlantic hurricane and tropical storm counts over the past 120-plus years support the notion that greenhouse gas-induced warming leads to large increases in either tropical storm or overall hurricane numbers.”

As Irma approached, The Washington Post ran an even dumber headline: “Irma and Harvey Should Kill Any Doubt That Climate Change Is Real.”

That’s phrased to make any skeptic look ridiculous.

Of course climate change is real! Climate changes — it always has and always will. For the past 300 years, since “the little ice age,” the globe warmed about three degrees. The warming started well before man emitted much carbon.

So the real unanswered questions are:

1. Will climate change become a crisis? (We face immediate crises now: poverty, terrorism, a $20 trillion debt, rebuilding after the hurricanes)

2. Is there anything we can do about it? (No. Not now; the science isn’t there yet.)

3. Did man’s burning fossil fuels increase the warming? (Probably. But we don’t know how much.)

I resent how the alarmists mix these questions, pretending all the science is settled. Notice how Trevor Noah, above, tossed out the words “man-made,” as if all climate change is man-made?

OK, he’s just a comic, but New York Times writers constantly yammer about “human-caused” and “man-made” climate change, too.

Politicians (and ex-politicians like Al Gore) are eager to exploit our fears by calling for more spending and regulation in the name of fighting deadly but preventable climate change — as if feeble efforts like the Paris climate accord would have made the tiniest difference. They wouldn’t. It’s all for show.

A video I made about this seems to have struck a chord. It got more than a million views over the weekend.

Some people reacted with anger online: “the scientific community suggest that humans are contributing to the warming of the planet. Isn’t (it) at least a little reckless to put a finger in each ear and say ‘Nuh uh! LALALALALALALALALA!'”

That would be reckless. But no one advocates that. We already spend a fortune on subsidies, mandates and climate research. The real questions are outlined above.

A calmer commenter wrote, “Don’t forget the hurricanes of the past. 1926 Miami, 1935 Keys, 1947 West Palm Beach, Donna 1961. People act like hurricanes like these have never happened.”

Right. And he left out Galveston’s hurricane in 1900, which killed as many as 12,000 people.

One commenter added, “It’s called El Nino and La Nina. We will be entering El Nino again (and) so seeing storms actually form. It shifts back and forth every 7-10 years or so. Do schools not teach these things?”

Climate fluctuates, and humans don’t have too much to say about it.

Maybe someday humans will be gone. The storms will continue. But at least there’ll be less hot air.

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A Handbook for Ranch ManagersA Handbook for Ranch Managers.  In keeping with the “holistic” idea that the land, the livestock, the people and the money should be viewed as a single integrated whole: Part I deals with the management of the natural resources. Part II covers livestock production and Part III deals with the people and the money. Not only would this book make an excellent basic text for a university program in Ranch Management, no professional ranch manager’s reference bookshelf should be without it. It is a comprehensive reference manual for managing the working ranch. The information in the appendices and extensive bibliography alone is worth the price of the book.

You might also be interested in the supplement to this Handbook: Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual.

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An Alternative Environmental Commentary

The politics of national news means states with few electoral votes are ignored. That’s okay. The victims of Hurricane Harvey and Hurricane Irma need help. We understand that here on the dusty plains. We are not screaming to get our share of a handout. We simply wish someone would notice, and emulate, how rural Americans have learned to give one another a hand-up.
Is there anybody out there who thinks that will ever happen? — jtl, 419

 

Twenty-nine years ago record drought and fires hit the West and no one seemed to notice. Frustrated, I sent query letters to the three largest East Coast newspapers, and to my surprise, The New York Times answered. My article on the West’s drought and fires ran in August 1988 in the New York Times Magazine and was syndicated and distributed world-wide.

Here we are again.

In many areas of the Northern Great Plains the 2017 drought and fires are worse. And again, the news media is hardly noticing and that is not surprising for us who live in “fly over country.”

We want the politicians and reporters to notice, but not for the reasons some might think. We are not standing beaten down, hat in hand, wanting a handout. We are taking care of our own, like rural folk do, and we wish the big city elites would learn from us. We are community here. We are rural strong.

While much of the West is on fire, Montana has been particularly hard hit. An estimated 1,100,000 acres have burned — that’s approximately 17,200 square miles, (Editors Note: twice the size of New Jersey and two-fifths larger than Maryland) — and numerous fires are still burning out of control. Thick blankets of hazardous smoke are forcing people to stay indoors and are forcing the cancellation of outdoor events.

Two main factors are at play here. One, is drought. Some parts of Eastern Montana have had only one inch of rain all year. Number two, is federal forest policies.

Take the Lodgepole Complex Fire for an example. It started on July 19 by a lightning strike on a Wilderness Study Area on Bureau of Land Management land. WSAs are a strange beast. They are not actually designated wilderness, but they are treated that way. In other words, neighboring landowners better not rush into a WSA to extinguish a fire. There are 545 BLM WSAs in America totaling 12,790,291 acres. Having the benefits of a wilderness designation without actually being a wilderness area, access into WSAs is restricted. Restricted access contributed to the Lodgepole Complex becoming a 300,000-acre inferno affecting some 350 landowners and leasees.

The government was slow to respond, but not so the rural population. A firestorm this spring caused huge devastation and took human life in the Midwest. The media hardly noticed then, either, but farmers, ranchers, and ag-related businesses did. Help came to areas of Texas and Kansas from as far away as Illinois and Michigan and homegrown relief agencies sprouted to handle the needs of the next catastrophe.

The next catastrophe came quickly.

Rural citizens across America responded to help victims of the Lodgepole Complex Fire. To date, over $750,000 in cash and 375 semi-loads of hay have been donated to the citizens of Petroleum and Garfield Counties in Eastern Montana. Children have offered their piggy banks and their prize money won at county fairs; farmers have delivered hay from as far away as Virginia; businessmen have donated fencing supplies; and college students have volunteered their labor on fencing crews. Cowboys from all over the state came to help gather strayed cattle.

In Western Montana, federal forest policies have created a tinder box. The United States Forest Service estimates there are 6.3 billion dead trees in the forests of eleven western states. Radical environmentalists, often using taxpayer money through the Equal Access for Justice Act, have jammed courts with legislation to keep loggers out of our nation’s forests. Mind you, I am not talking about wilderness areas here. I am talking about millions of acres of forest managed by the USFS. Without proper logging management, timber stands become too thick, the trees weaken, and pine beetles and other scourges set in. Mix in drought and lightning, and vast timberlands go ablaze in infernos only heavy rain or snow can contain.

Fires aside, the Northern Plains is suffering terrible drought. In some areas grass has not grown for two years. Many cattle have already gone to auction as stock ponds, reservoirs, wells, and springs are dry. Cattle are perishing in bogs, the mud hole a stock pond becomes when the water is gone and dying to dust pneumonia as livestock might trail two or three miles to water, creating a thick dust cloud that is breathed-in by the animals at the back.

While 2017 will go down in the record books in Montana for fire and drought, most of us here have seen it nearly this bad before. This isn’t our first rodeo. We will get by with a little help from our friends. “Neighbor” is a verb here, not a noun. “Neighboring” is something we do and even local bankers become good neighbors in times like these.

The politics of national news means states with few electoral votes are ignored. That’s okay. The victims of Hurricane Harvey and Hurricane Irma need help. We understand that here on the dusty plains. We are not screaming to get our share of a handout.

We simply wish someone would notice, and emulate, how rural Americans have learned to give one another a hand-up.

Both images used in this article are courtesy of KTVQ.com.

John L. Moore is a third-generation Montana cattle rancher and a multi-award-winning novelist and journalist.

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersLand & Livestock International, Inc is offering a “Free” week-long ranch management-planned grazing seminar-workshop.

What follows is a business model we have been following that has worked very well for us and for our clientele.

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualWe are seeking individual ranchers to sponsor/host workshops. The sponsor/host (and spouse or key employee) get the training at his/her ranch for no charge. This is an extra special benefit to the host as his/her land will be used for the “lab” work and hands on demonstrations. This provides a great start in the implementation of his/her program.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewIn return, he/she takes care of the logistics involved in putting on the event. This includes arranging for the venue, booking a block of rooms for lodging, arranging for meals (if any), putting out the advertising, setting and collecting the fees and so forth.

We are then responsible for putting on the workshop.

During the interim we will each keep track of our out of pocket costs (from our end, that will be mostly travel and lodging). Then, when it is all over, we both are reimbursed our out of pocket costs and split any funds remaining 50:50.

If this sounds like something you might be interested in, click here and let us know. If the link won’t work for you, copy and paste info@landandlivestockinternational.com into your browser.

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