The End of an Era

For those of us that have traded these markets for decades, this week marks the end of an era… The migration to electronic trading is virtually complete.

A Handbook for Ranch Managers For some reason this leaves me with a sad, empty feeling. “Nostalgic” is probably the best way to describe it. That could be because I am one of those that have followed and traded those markets for decades.  — jtl

By Cassie Fish, CassandraFish.com. The Beef & Cassandra Fish

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualFor those of us that have traded these markets for decades, this week marks the end of an era. The agricultural trading pits at the CME and CBOT were a place where the professional market maker assumed risk and the commercial trader laid it off with confidence and transparency. There was a distinctive and very discernible action to read, a road map as it were, for a dedicated student of the market.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewThe trading floor was a vital community as well as a place of commerce. Every major cattle feeder and beef packer talked to someone on the floor, sometimes multiple times daily as information was shared, ideas exchanged and lifelong friendships forged. Farm kids fresh out of college headed to Chicago to seek their fortune and if they stuck with it could learn valuable skills and find opportunities available nowhere else.

Combat Shooter's HandbookThe migration to electronic trading is virtually complete. Traders now fly blind with transparency a thing of the past. Computer algorithms generate orders at lightning speed and attempt to read the book before blowing through it. Gone are the days of multiple scaled up or down orders providing fodder for the market to chew through, which created a certain methodical pace much of the time. Here to stay is much greater volatility much more frequently- some of it meaningless in the broader context.

The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsThough the futures pits won’t officially shut down until Monday, today is the expiration of Jun LC, the final pit traded live cattle futures contract after 51 years. Currently Jun LC is trading higher on the week but lower on the month. From a spot market perspective, Jun LC is likely to have the lowest expiration of any cattle contract since April 2014.

Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps InstituteThe lowest spot price expiration in 14 months is a reflection of the sense of resignation in the cattle industry right now both on the financial and physical side. Resignation not only by those traders who will miss the sense of confidence and fairness that came from conducting business in the pit, but also on the cattle feeding side where the limited negotiation cash trade has diminished the sense of confidence and fairness there as well. There is an underlying feeling that these changes are larger than life and unstoppable translating to a sense of diminished individual power.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) Today’s post is dedicated with gratitude to the men and women who took the orders, filled the orders, kept the count straight, reconciled the out trades, swept the paper, assumed the risk and made the market. It was a job well done.

The Beef is published by Consolidated Beef Producers…for more info click here.
Disclaimer:  The Beef, CBP nor Cassie Fish shall not be liable for decisions or actions taken based on the data/information/opinions.

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Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualPlanned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual. This is the ideal squeal to A Handbook for Ranch Managers.  Although the ecological principles remain the same, what was originally known as “The Savory Grazing Method” now answers to a multitude of different names: ranching for profit, holistic management, managed grazing, mob grazing, management intensive grazing, etc. Land & Livestock International, Inc. uses “Restoration Grazing” under its “Managing the Ranch as a Business” program.” No mater what you call it, this summary and synopsis will guide you step by step through the process and teach you how to use it as it was originally intended. No more excuses for failing to complete your grazing plans.

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Clay Nanni and American Mustangs

 I’m all for it provided he is doing it on his own land and with his own money. But even at that, take a look at the condition of the range–probably 90% or better bare ground.

Actually, if managed properly, horses can be an even better tool for achieving herd effect at high stock densities. The way they “scuff” their front feet at a walk breaks up the cap over the surface of the soil. — jtl, 419

Screen Shot 2015-06-24 at 7.42.19 PM copy

In a land of enormous skies and majestic valleys, Mustang Monument Wild Horse Eco-Resort & Sanctuary is home to over 600 Wild American Mustangs.

Cowboy and family man, Clay Nannini, shares insight into the value of preserving the American Mustang while introducing his children to this icon of American history, and a legacy worth protecting.

A Handbook for Ranch Managers Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual Combat Shooter's HandbookReconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps InstituteThe Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View

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A Handbook for Ranch ManagersA Handbook for Ranch Managers.  In keeping with the “holistic” idea that the land, the livestock, the people and the money should be viewed as a single integrated whole: Part I deals with the management of the natural resources. Part II covers livestock production and Part III deals with the people and the money. Not only would this book make an excellent basic text for a university program in Ranch Management, no professional ranch manager’s reference bookshelf should be without it. It is a comprehensive reference manual for managing the working ranch. The information in the appendices and extensive bibliography alone is worth the price of the book.

You might be interested in this books supplement: Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual.

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McDonald’s ‘verified sustainable beef’ project steams ahead

 Visit to Alberta from McDonald’s global CEO signals a sea change in the Canadian beef industry

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View A capitalist responding to a market demand is well and good. But…that word “sustainable” gives me the “willies” because it is from the language used in the UN’s Agenda 21–which is anything BUT a capitalist model. — jtl, 419

By via The Canadian Cattlemen

three men talking on a cattle pasture
McDonald’s Corporation president and CEO Steve Easterbrook (centre) and McDonald’s Canada president and CEO John Betts talk to Graeme Finn (right) on a tour of his ranch near Crossfield on 
June 9. Photo: McDonald’s Canada

A Handbook for Ranch Managers  It’s full speed ahead for McDonald’s “verified sustainable beef” project.

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualThe country’s largest buyer of beef is finishing up the first phase of its groundbreaking pilot project in Canada, and earlier this month the head of the global fast-food giant paid a visit to Alberta to get a first-hand look.

Combat Shooter's HandbookReconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps InstituteThe Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsRecently appointed CEO Steve Easterbrook visited CL Ranches just west of Calgary and Southern Cross Livestock near Crossfield.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) “Being as he’s brand spanking new to the job, the sustainability team, which is headquartered in Chicago, really wanted to give him the opportunity to see first hand what they’re up to here in Canada,” said Cherie Copithorne-Barnes, CEO of CL Ranches and chair of the Canadian Roundtable for Sustainable Beef.

“That was really important because he comes from more of a business side of things and really had no exposure whatsoever to what they’re doing with the sustainable pilot project.”

Easterbrook — who has vowed to “shape McDonald’s future as a modern, progressive burger company” — was keenly interested in what he saw and heard, said Jeffrey Fitzpatrick-Stilwell, senior manager of sustainability with McDonald’s Canada.

He pointed to Easterbrook’s visit to Southern Cross Livestock where rancher Graeme Finn has made soil health his No. 1 priority.

“They were right down there in the dirt, talking about how he preserves the topsoil and stuff,” said Fitzpatrick-Stilwell. “That’s really what we wanted to expose Steve to. It’s a lot more than the animal itself — beef sustainability goes beyond that. It’s about the grass that they’re grazing and the grains that are being grown for them. It’s a much bigger picture.”

Following the visit of Easterbrook — who was accompanied by World Wildlife Fund CEO Carter Roberts and top officials from McDonald’s and Cargill — the company announced that 19 Alberta ranches have been verified and 100 cattle organizations from B.C. to Ontario have signed up to participate in the next phase of the pilot project. Participants include producers, feedlots, and processors.

McDonald’s plans to end the pilot next April and hand off the project to the Canadian Roundtable for Sustainable Beef, whose membership includes beef producers, processors, retailers, restaurant chains, and environmental organizations.

“We haven’t decided as the Canadian Roundtable how it will keep progressing but at the end of April 2016, when the McDonald’s pilot project is over, if it just dies, then it has been an immense failure for the industry,” said Alberta rancher Bob Lowe, a member of the advisory committee on the McDonald’s pilot.

“There are a few of us who don’t plan on letting that happen if we have anything to say about it.”

Copithorne-Barnes took the opportunity to explain to Easterbrook how sustainability has long been a top priority at her family’s ranch, which was established in 1887.

She said the roundtable is up to the task of carrying on the work begun under the pilot project.

“The indicators that McDonald’s is developing are being shared with us, so we know the status on those indicators and we will be the ones who add the indicators from the life-cycle analysis (being done by consulting firm Deloitte),” said Copithorne-Barnes. “We will combine the best of both worlds. To be frank, we can’t be as finite as what McDonald’s was hoping to do. We have to have a basic plan that people are comfortable with answering and it’s not going to be too onerous.”

One of the key lessons for his boss was hearing that Canadian beef producers want “a credible way to talk about the positive things that they’re already doing,” said Fitzpatrick-Stilwell.

“The pilot is helping them verify best practices that they assumed they were already following, but it’s also helping them identify some areas of opportunity,” he said.

Copithorne-Barnes echoed that view, saying the verification process got her thinking differently about some of the things she’s doing on her ranch.

The McDonald’s pilot project is still looking for interested cattle producers. Any size of operation is welcome. For more information on the pilot project and how to participate, visit www.vsbpilot.ca.

Alexis Kienlen is a reporter for the Alberta Farmer Express

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View

edited by

Dr Jimmy T (Gunny) LaBaume

Is now available in both PAPERBACK and Kindle

BookCoverImageMurray N. Rothbard was the father of what some call Radical Libertarianism or Anarcho-Capitalism which Hans-Hermann Hoppe described as “Rothbard’s unique contribution to the rediscovery of property and property rights as the common foundation of both economics and political philosophy, and the systematic reconstruction and conceptual integration of modern, marginalist economics and natural-law political philosophy into a unified moral science: libertarianism.”

This book applies the principles of this “unified moral science” to environmental and natural resource management issues.

The book started out life as an assigned reading list for a university level course entitled Environmental and Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View.

As I began to prepare to teach the course, I quickly saw that there was a plethora of textbooks suitable for universal level courses dealing with environmental and natural resource economics. The only problem was that they were all based in mainstream neo-classical (or Keynesian) theory. I could find no single collection of material comprising a comprehensive treatment of environmental and natural resource economics based on Austrian Economic Theory.

However, I was able to find a large number of essays, monographs, papers delivered at professional meetings and published from a multitude of sources. This book is the result. It is composed of a collection of research reports and essays by reputable scientists, economists, and legal experts as well as private property and free market activists.

The book is organized into seven parts: I. Environmentalism: The New State Religion; II. The New State Religion Debunked; III. Introduction to Environmental and Natural Resource Economics; IV. Interventionism: Law and Regulation; V. Pollution and Recycling; VI. Property Rights: Planning, Zoning and Eminent Domain; and VII. Free Market Conservation. It also includes an elaborate Bibliography, References and Recommended Reading section including an extensive Annotated Bibliography of related and works on the subject.

The intellectual level of the individual works ranges from quite scholarly to informed editorial opinion.

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How an HSUS employee scandal reveals incompetency of animal rights organization

An employee of the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) has been accused of embezzling more than $31,000 in funds from donors. What’s worse is how HSUS manages the money it receives from well-intentioned animal lovers.

A Handbook for Ranch Managers $31,175 is peanut pocket change compared to what the management gets away with…”legally.” Do NOT send money to HSUS. Do NOT fall for they little, sad eyed doggie pics on TV. If you must support the “cause” just about every Podunk Junction has an animal shelter. — jtl, 419

by in BEEF Daily

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualI recently received word from the Center for Consumer Freedom (CCF) that an employee of the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) has been charged with embezzling $31,175 from donors and, as a result, is facing 20 years in prison. The employee allegedly used the stolen donations to fund an elaborate vacation to Aruba, among other personal purchases.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewWhat’s more, CCF argues that, worse than the embezzlement scandal, HSUS mismanages most of the donations it receives from well-intentioned animal lovers.

According to a CCF press release, “More shocking, The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfitshowever, is the fact that HSUS itself sent $50 million to the Caribbean over a two-year period instead of using that money to help care for needy pets in America.”

A review of HSUS’ tax returns for 2012 and 2013, Combat Shooter's HandbookReconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institutewhich CCF says are the two most recent tax years available, reveals that HSUS moved $50 million of donor money to the Caribbean, apparently all to hedge funds in the Cayman Islands and Bermuda.

Learn how HSUS dupes donors by clicking here.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) “If the employee had sent that money to the Caribbean instead of herself, as alleged, it would have simply been business as usual at HSUS,” says Will Coggin, CCF director of research, in the recent CCF release. “Even more scandalous than the embezzlement of $31,000 is that HSUS has taken over 1,000 times that amount and placed it in the Caribbean hedge funds instead of using that money to help care for currently needy dogs and cats. Donors should be repulsed by both the incompetence of HSUS management and its willingness to turn its back on the animals it claims to speak for.”

A Charity Navigator “Donor Advisory” has been issued against HSUS after the animal rights organization was involved in a $25-million settlement of a racketeering, fraud and bribery lawsuit in 2014.

While it’s been some time since I’ve last blogged about HSUS, this news is important to share as there are still many folks who donate money to this animal rights organization because they genuinely believe that HSUS is an umbrella group that trickles funds down to local animal shelters.

Fortunately, HSUS is losing credibility amongst donors because at long last, the wolf wearing sheep clothing is finally being revealed. Check out CCF’s article titled, “HSUS’s legal shenanigans” to see what I mean.

Share today’s blog post on social media and let’s keep the momentum going by spreading the word about how HSUS dupes its donors, misuses funds and has little intention of actually helping animals. 
 What do you think about the most recent HSUS scandal? Share your thoughts in the comments section below.

The opinions of Amanda Radke are not necessarily those of beefmagazine.com or Penton Agriculture.

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A Handbook for Ranch ManagersA Handbook for Ranch Managers.  In keeping with the “holistic” idea that the land, the livestock, the people and the money should be viewed as a single integrated whole: Part I deals with the management of the natural resources. Part II covers livestock production and Part III deals with the people and the money. Not only would this book make an excellent basic text for a university program in Ranch Management, no professional ranch manager’s reference bookshelf should be without it. It is a comprehensive reference manual for managing the working ranch. The information in the appendices and extensive bibliography alone is worth the price of the book.

You might be interested in this books supplement: Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual.

Posted in Animal Health, Animal Rights | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

The Nine Calf Cow

… the cow calf business is the cull cow business.

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual The only cow close to any ranch I might own a controlling interest in is the one the old lady milks every morning. I have never in my life pulled a calf out of a steer at three o’clock in the morning. — jtl

by Dave Pratt via Ranching for Profit Blog

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersI just read an article written by an ag economist on the value of bred heifers. He wrote that a crossbred heifer producing 9 consecutive calves in her lifetime is worth just over $3,200. Whoa!!! Nine calves! To be fair the author acknowledges that not all heifers will produce 9 consecutive calves. He figures 34% will die or be culled before their 9th year. I think he’s a little off.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewI don’t know what kind of culling criteria he used and what he wrote off as death loss, so let’s make some rough assumptions of our own. Let’s say we cull open cows, dry cows, cows with bad eyes, bad udders and cows that feel the need to chase us out of the corral. Let’s also make the following assumptions:

• We start the year with 100 bred heifers
• The conception rate on our cows is 95% (5% open)
• 95% of those that get pregnant actually wean a calf (5% dry)
• Annual culling for bad eyes, bad udders, bad temperament , bad etc. averages 5%
• We average 1% death loss

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) With those assumptions, which under range conditions are pretty optimistic, we’d need to replace 16% of the herd each year (5 + 5 + 5 + 1 = 16). If the replacement rate is 16% how many of those original 100 heifers do you think will still be in the herd after nine years?

Combat Shooter's HandbookReconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps InstituteThe Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsDo the math and you’ll see that only 22 of our original 100 heifers will make it to the end of the 9th year. The economist may be right. The 22 heifers that will produce 9 consecutive calves might be worth $3,200 … and I wish I could tell those 22 from the other 78 when they are still heifers!

I told the audience at a recent workshop that cow depreciation is the biggest cost of keeping a cow. During a break one of the participants asked me to elaborate on that. I started by asking the cost of his replacements. He raised his own replacements but said that if he sold his bred heifers he’d probably get $2,900. I then asked the price he’d get when he sold open, dry or cull animals. Of course it would vary by cow age and condition and market conditions, but he settled on an average of $1,500. Once we had that figured out I asked him to estimate rates for conception, weaning, culling and death loss. Adding it up, it came to a 20% replacement rate. (That’s normal in a typical cow herd.) After doing a little napkin math he was none too happy when I showed him that 49 of his bred heifers would not be in the herd after 3 years. He was even less pleased when I divided the difference between the purchase price and the cull price by 3 years (the average productive life of his cows) and showed him that the average annual depreciation on his cows was $467 per cow.

Of course the open, dry and cull rates and death loss don’t happen at the same rate each year. Death loss and the open and dry rates for H2’s are usually significantly higher than they are for young cows.

We make some pretty optimistic (and unrealistic) assumptions about the productivity of our animals … as optimistic and unrealistic as the economist that published the work on heifer projections. Nine calves per cow? In your dreams.

Ranching For Profit School alumni know that the cow calf business is the cull cow business. They also know that the key to the cull cow business is managing depreciation. I’ve written extensively about strategies for minimizing cow deprecation. Now it’s your turn. Please share your strategies with us.

If you want to see the results for other replacement rates click here.

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Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualPlanned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual. This is the ideal squeal to A Handbook for Ranch Managers.  Although the ecological principles remain the same, what was originally known as “The Savory Grazing Method” now answers to a multitude of different names: ranching for profit, holistic management, managed grazing, mob grazing, management intensive grazing, etc. Land & Livestock International, Inc. uses “Restoration Grazing” under its “Managing the Ranch as a Business” program.” No mater what you call it, this summary and synopsis will guide you step by step through the process and teach you how to use it as it was originally intended. No more excuses for failing to complete your grazing plans.

Posted in Cattle Production, Ranch Economics | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Bullies try to derail local control of public lands

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewTransferring the so-called “public lands” to the States would not be a permanent answer but it surely would be a step in the right direction. — jtl

By Montana State Senator Jennifer Fielder via American Lands Council

A Handbook for Ranch Managers  Over the past 3 years, the idea of transferring federally managed public lands to the states has swelled from a small town dream to a full-fledged national movement. As grass roots support grows, organized opposition bolsters their attempts to distort the truth and dirty the reputations of good, honest people.

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualFor example, opponents have repeatedly told everyone that if Montanans were in charge of our own lands and resources, we would sell them all off. Well, I think that kind of criticism is selling Montanans short.

Combat Shooter's HandbookReconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps InstituteThe Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsWhether it is work, play, or the scenic beauty of our rolling prairies, majestic mountains, or clear blue waters, Montana’s public lands are special to all of us. There’s no need to sell public lands to make money because wise stewardship of natural resources can produce more than enough revenue to cover land management costs while enhancing the environment and providing world class outdoor recreation.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) Early this year, I introduced SB215, a simple bill that would prohibit the sale of any federal land that may be transferred to the state in the future. Guess who opposed the law that would keep public lands public? It was the same left-leaning organizations who are telling everyone we would sell it! Specifically, paid lobbyists representing Montana Wilderness Association, Montana Wildlife Federation, and Montana Audubon Society came into our State Capitol and testified against SB215. So did democrat Governor Bullock’s administration.

Amazingly, just one week later, the same groups held a “keep it public” rally in the State Capitol. They came up with a lot of money from somewhere to bus hundreds of people in from all over Montana and feed them free lunch to go with the line of “bull” they served up over the megaphone.

A few weeks later the Montana Democrat party piled on with a bogus fund raising letter falsely stating that my bill, SB215, was a bill to “sell Montana’s public lands”. In actuality, SB215 reads: “An act prohibiting future sales of land granted or transferred to the state”. You can verify what I am reporting here by reviewing the official public record at http://leg.mt.gov and search the LAWS data base for SB215. I welcome you to read the bill and watch the video of the hearing to see who really testified in favor of keeping public lands public and who opposed it.

Governor Steve Bullock recently held an expensive statewide “telephone town hall”, apparently funded by the Wilderness Association to perpetuate blatant untruths about the transfer of public lands movement. The latest whopper came about two weeks ago from a mysterious new, self-proclaimed “watchdog” group which is run by high level democrat political strategists in Washington DC. In spite of the fact that transfer of public lands to the states has already been done before, this group is claiming it is “fraudulent” to work toward less federal control of the public land in our states! That, my friends, is a desperate attempt to shut down debate, suppress free speech, and stifle our success.

Despite the organized opposition’s outrageous rhetoric and relentless attacks, the grass roots movement for local control has been so successful that seventeen States and the U.S. Congress have now initiated legislation in favor of turning federal lands over to willing states. Fifty western counties and numerous organizations have issued official statements of support. Many have donated time and resources to the effort and more are joining every day.

Obviously the idea of thoughtful, accountable, locally driven stewardship of our public lands makes sense to a growing number of people. Many of us realize Montanans would make wiser choices for our lands than distant decision makers in Washington DC. We could become a more self-reliant state with better public access, environmental health, and economic productivity on our public lands. And that seems to scare some very powerful, very wealthy bullies who prefer federal control of Montana.

I won’t be bullied. Any time you have a question, feel free to contact me a sen.jennifer.fielder@mt.gov or visit www.jenniferfielder.us. You can get more facts about the transfer of public lands at www.AmericanLandsCouncil.org

https://youtu.be/_jK4KPJcHyo

As Senator Fielder, the American Lands Council will not be bullied. We will continue to stand up for the rights of all states to be equal, sovereign powers in these United States.

American Lands Council
http://www.americanlandscouncil.org/

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View

edited by

Dr Jimmy T (Gunny) LaBaume

Is now available in both PAPERBACK and Kindle

BookCoverImageMurray N. Rothbard was the father of what some call Radical Libertarianism or Anarcho-Capitalism which Hans-Hermann Hoppe described as “Rothbard’s unique contribution to the rediscovery of property and property rights as the common foundation of both economics and political philosophy, and the systematic reconstruction and conceptual integration of modern, marginalist economics and natural-law political philosophy into a unified moral science: libertarianism.”

This book applies the principles of this “unified moral science” to environmental and natural resource management issues.

The book started out life as an assigned reading list for a university level course entitled Environmental and Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View.

As I began to prepare to teach the course, I quickly saw that there was a plethora of textbooks suitable for universal level courses dealing with environmental and natural resource economics. The only problem was that they were all based in mainstream neo-classical (or Keynesian) theory. I could find no single collection of material comprising a comprehensive treatment of environmental and natural resource economics based on Austrian Economic Theory.

However, I was able to find a large number of essays, monographs, papers delivered at professional meetings and published from a multitude of sources. This book is the result. It is composed of a collection of research reports and essays by reputable scientists, economists, and legal experts as well as private property and free market activists.

The book is organized into seven parts: I. Environmentalism: The New State Religion; II. The New State Religion Debunked; III. Introduction to Environmental and Natural Resource Economics; IV. Interventionism: Law and Regulation; V. Pollution and Recycling; VI. Property Rights: Planning, Zoning and Eminent Domain; and VII. Free Market Conservation. It also includes an elaborate Bibliography, References and Recommended Reading section including an extensive Annotated Bibliography of related and works on the subject.

The intellectual level of the individual works ranges from quite scholarly to informed editorial opinion.

FOLLOW LAND & LIVESTOCK INTERNATIONAL ON FACEBOOK

Check out our WebSite

Check out our Online Rancher Supply Store

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Cruel gray wolf release experiment needs to end

Public testimony demonstrated little support from the local communities for the release of another naïve (born and raised in captivity) wolf.

A Handbook for Ranch Managers Dr E Lamar Smith taught me a great many things about the “real world.” One that always stood out in my mind is what he said about the reason they have “public meetings” on such issues–so they can say, well, at least somebody agrees with us. — jtl, 419

by Dan Bell via The Arizona Republic

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualIn March, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service collected public comments at the Alpine community center on the proposed release of Mexican graywolves for 2015.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewPublic testimony demonstrated little support from the local communities for the release of another naïve (born and raised in captivity) wolf. Fish and Wildlife said the wolf release was needed for more genetic diversity in the wolves in Arizona.

Combat Shooter's HandbookReconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps InstituteThe Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsOn April 7, a woman walking her dog in Eagar found herself stalked and threatened by a wolf. On April 22, a male wolf was released in spite of local opposition; on May 20 that wolf was ordered killed because it had too many human interactions and had left Arizona and gone into New Mexico. In April and May two Arizona ranch families found wolves harassing their cattle.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) Too often, this is the experience the people and the wolves in northeastern Arizona encounter. Genetic diversity and components of the captive wolf program were brought into question in the early 1990s by biologists who were concerned these captive populations contained genetic material from coyotes that had bred with the original wolves in the captive program.

The Fish and Wildlife defended the genetic diversity of the captive population, but now they claim it is lacking and thus the need to release the male wolf they have now killed.

History and science tells us that Arizona is on the northern fringe of the habitat Mexican gray wolves populated. Ninety percent of their habitat is in Mexico. How many are in Mexico, you ask? Not many. How many are in Arizona and New Mexico? More than 109 wolves is the official number because not every wolf is counted under this cruel experiment.

History also tells us that there were no large packs of wolves roaming Arizona; only a lonely and limited number of wolves that fled their primary habitat in Mexico and went north.

In addition to these fringe” habitat issues, we also now have wolf hybrids roaming the area. How these wolves entered the area no one knows, but authorities have recognized them and some are calling for these wolves to be removed.

The mythical aura of a wild wolf howling in the forest and claiming its ecological niche would be fine except for the fact that this area is not their primary habitat — never was, never should be. When you include the presence of a large number of people in and around the area of this cruel experiment, you can see what is coming.

The only people seeming to enjoy this cruel experiment are the scientists or government employees who get to run around the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest catching, snaring, tagging, taking wolf pups out of their dens and moving them to other dens, and wolf proponents that do not have to witness this cruelty to the wolves and people who live and work in these areas.

The Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest is not a laboratory; it is a landscape. It is not an unoccupied area where wolves can freely roam with nearly no human interaction, and it certainly isn’t an area where the wolf can be free of government employees continually harassing them.

I do not say this to disparage those working on this wolf program; I say it to demonstrate that when you release and maintain wolves in an area, where they were not in such numbers historically and where human populations are sprinkled in and amongst them, they will be harassed.

Is this what the public wanted? Has Fish and Wildlife been transparent in reporting all of this to the public? It certainly is not what we wanted and it’s time for this cruel experiment to stop!

Dan Bell is president of the Arizona Cattle Grower’s Association

The mythical aura of a wild wolf howling in the forest and claiming its ecological niche would be fine except for the fact that this area is not their primary habitat — never was, never should be.

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A Handbook for Ranch ManagersA Handbook for Ranch Managers.  In keeping with the “holistic” idea that the land, the livestock, the people and the money should be viewed as a single integrated whole: Part I deals with the management of the natural resources. Part II covers livestock production and Part III deals with the people and the money. Not only would this book make an excellent basic text for a university program in Ranch Management, no professional ranch manager’s reference bookshelf should be without it. It is a comprehensive reference manual for managing the working ranch. The information in the appendices and extensive bibliography alone is worth the price of the book.

You might be interested in this books supplement: Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual.

Posted in Endangered Species Act, Radical Environmentalism | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

FOREST SERVICE: GOP Cheers as Chief Formally Withdraws Groundwater Rule

Phil Taylor, E&E reporter

A Handbook for Ranch Managers Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell today formally withdrew a proposal to more carefully gauge how the agency’s land management decisions affect groundwater.

The agency’s groundwater directive, unveiled in Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualMay 2014, had sparked a torrent of criticism from Republicans and Western governors who argued it could usurp states’ authority to allocate water.

The Forest Service’s notice of withdrawal in today’s Federal Register acknowledges those concerns but Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian Viewcalls them unfounded. While the proposal was received favorably by tribes and conservation groups, the agency “must have further discussions” with other stakeholders before moving forward with the proposal, it said.

Combat Shooter's HandbookReconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps InstituteThe Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits“The proposed directives did not, and any future actions will not, infringe on state authority, impose requirements on private landowners or change the long-standing relationship between the Forest Service, states, and tribes on water,” the notice reads. “The intent of any new groundwater proposed directive or next steps would be to establish a clearer and more consistent approach to evaluating and monitoring the effects of actions on groundwater resources of the National Forest System.”

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) The move drew praise from House Natural Resources Chairman Rob Bishop (R-Utah), whose panel discussed the rule at a hearing in April with the Forest Service’s Leslie Weldon, deputy chief of the national forest system.

“Finally, after more than a year, states and private water rights holders can have some peace of mind in knowing this policy is now officially off the table,” Bishop said in a statement this afternoon. “From the outset the Forest Service failed to identify any practical or legal basis for this directive.”

Tidwell had announced in February that the directive had been placed on hold pending further discussions with Western stakeholders, but Bishop and five other leading Republicans in March asked that he permanently withdraw it (E&E Daily, March 13).

The withdrawal comes a day after a Senate Energy and Natural Resources panel held a hearing to discuss a GOP bill to combat what critics describe as “federal water grabs” in the West including the groundwater directive (E&E Daily, June 19).

The directive would have required the Forest Service to better account for how surface uses such as wells and mines would affect groundwater and groundwater-dependent ecosystems. If potential harm were discovered, the agency would work with forest users to mitigate those impacts.

Dozens of conservation groups rallied behind the directive, saying in comments submitted to the Forest Service that it provides long-overdue recognition of the interconnectedness of groundwater and surface water, and the need to better track how groundwater withdrawals affect ecosystems and downstream users.

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Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualPlanned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual. This is the ideal squeal to A Handbook for Ranch Managers.  Although the ecological principles remain the same, what was originally known as “The Savory Grazing Method” now answers to a multitude of different names: ranching for profit, holistic management, managed grazing, mob grazing, management intensive grazing, etc. Land & Livestock International, Inc. uses “Restoration Grazing” under its “Managing the Ranch as a Business” program.” No mater what you call it, this summary and synopsis will guide you step by step through the process and teach you how to use it as it was originally intended. No more excuses for failing to complete your grazing plans.

Posted in Water, Water Issues | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Inequality: The Rhetoric and Reality

There’s only one source of prosperity, and it’s not redistribution…Equal freedom under a just rule of law and limited government doesn’t mean that everyone will be equal in their endowments, motivations, or aptitudes. Disallowing those differences, however, destroys the driving force behind wealth creation and poverty reduction…

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewThe phrase “all men are created equal” is probably the most misunderstood and misinterpreted few words in all of the founding documents. 

I just wish we could make the USDA, FDA, EPA et al understand that. — jtl, 419

by from The Freeman

A Handbook for Ranch Managers The publication of Thomas Piketty’s bestseller Capital in the Twenty-First Century has led to widespread attention on the rising gap between rich and poor, and to populist calls for government to redistribute income and wealth.

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualPurveyors of that rhetoric, however, overlook the reality that when the state plays a major role in leveling differences in income and wealth, economic freedom is eroded. The problem is, economic freedom is the true engine of progress for all people.

Combat Shooter's HandbookReconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps InstituteThe Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsIncome and wealth are created in the process of discovering and expanding new markets. Innovation and entrepreneurship extend the range of choices open to people. And yet not everyone is equal in their contribution to this process. There are differences among people in their abilities, motivations, and entrepreneurial talent, not to mention their life circumstances.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)Those differences are the basis of comparative advantage and the gains from voluntary exchanges on private free markets. Both rich and poor gain from free markets; trade is not a zero- or negative-sum game.

Attacking the rich, as if they are guilty of some crime, and calling for state action to bring about a “fairer” distribution of income and wealth leads to an ethos of envy — certainly not one that supports the foundations of abundance: private property, personal responsibility, and freedom.

In an open market system, people who create new products and services prosper, as do consumers. Entrepreneurs create wealth and choices. The role of the state should be to safeguard rights to property and let markets flourish. When state power trumps free markets, choices are narrowed and opportunities for wealth creation are lost.

Throughout history, governments have discriminated against the rich, ultimately harming the poor. Central planning should have taught us that replacing private entrepreneurs with government bureaucrats merely politicizes economic life and concentrates power; it does not widen choices or increase income mobility.

Peter Bauer, a pioneer in development economics, recognized early on that “in a modern open society, the accumulation of wealth, especially great wealth, normally results from activities which extend the choices of others.”

Government has the power to coerce, but private entrepreneurs must persuade consumers to buy their products and convince investors to support their vision. The process of “creative destruction,” as described by Joseph Schumpeter, means that dynastic wealth is often short-lived.

Bauer preferred to use the term “economic differences” rather than “economic inequality.” He did so because he thought the former would convey more meaning than the latter. The rhetoric of inequality fosters populism and even extremism in the quest for egalitarian outcomes. In contrast, speaking of differences recognizes reality and reminds us that “differences in readiness to utilize economic opportunities — willingness to innovate, to assume risk, to organize — are highly significant in explaining economic differences in open societies.”

What interested Bauer was how to increase the range of choices open to people, not how to use government to reduce differences in income and wealth. As Bauer reminded us,

Political power implies the ability of rulers forcibly to restrict the choices open to those they rule. Enforced reduction or removal of economic differences emerging from voluntary arrangements extends and intensifies the inequality of coercive power.

Equal freedom under a just rule of law and limited government doesn’t mean that everyone will be equal in their endowments, motivations, or aptitudes. Disallowing those differences, however, destroys the driving force behind wealth creation and poverty reduction. There is no better example than China.

Under Mao Zedong, private entrepreneurs were outlawed, as was private property, which is the foundation of free markets. Slogans such as “Strike hard against the slightest sign of private ownership” allowed little room for improving the plight of the poor. The establishment of communes during the “Great Leap Forward” (1958–1961) and the centralization of economic decision making led to the Great Famine, ended civil society, and imposed an iron fence around individualism while following a policy of forced egalitarianism.

In contrast, China’s paramount leader Deng Xiaoping allowed the resurgence of markets and opened China to the outside world. Now the largest trading nation in the world, China has demonstrated that economic liberalization is the best cure for broadening people’s choices and has allowed hundreds of millions of people to lift themselves out of poverty.

Deng’s slogan “To get rich is glorious” is in stark contrast to Mao’s leveling schemes. In 1978, and as recently as 2002, there were no Chinese billionaires; today there are 220. That change would not have been possible without the development of China as a trading nation.

There are now 536 billionaires in the United States and growing animosity against the “1 percent” — especially by those who were harmed by the Great Recession. Nevertheless, polls have shown that most Americans think economic growth is far more important than capping the incomes of the very rich or narrowing the income gap. Only 3 percent of those polled by CBS and the New York Times in January thought that economic inequality was the primary problem facing the nation. Most Americans are more concerned with income mobility — that is, moving up the income ladder — then with penalizing success.

Regardless, some politicians will use inflammatory rhetoric to make differences between rich and poor the focus of their campaigns in the presidential election season. In doing so, they should recognize the risks that government intervention in the creation and distribution of income and wealth pose for a free society and for all-around prosperity.

Government policies can widen the gap between rich and poor through corporate welfare, through unconventional monetary policy that penalizes savers while pumping up asset prices, and through minimum wage laws and other legislation that price low-skilled workers out of the market and thus impede income mobility.

A positive program designed to foster economic growth — and leave people free to choose — by lowering marginal tax rates on labor and capital, reducing costly regulations, slowing the growth of government, and normalizing monetary policy would be the best medicine to benefit both rich and poor.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View

edited by

Dr Jimmy T (Gunny) LaBaume

Is now available in both PAPERBACK and Kindle

BookCoverImageMurray N. Rothbard was the father of what some call Radical Libertarianism or Anarcho-Capitalism which Hans-Hermann Hoppe described as “Rothbard’s unique contribution to the rediscovery of property and property rights as the common foundation of both economics and political philosophy, and the systematic reconstruction and conceptual integration of modern, marginalist economics and natural-law political philosophy into a unified moral science: libertarianism.”

This book applies the principles of this “unified moral science” to environmental and natural resource management issues.

The book started out life as an assigned reading list for a university level course entitled Environmental and Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View.

As I began to prepare to teach the course, I quickly saw that there was a plethora of textbooks suitable for universal level courses dealing with environmental and natural resource economics. The only problem was that they were all based in mainstream neo-classical (or Keynesian) theory. I could find no single collection of material comprising a comprehensive treatment of environmental and natural resource economics based on Austrian Economic Theory.

However, I was able to find a large number of essays, monographs, papers delivered at professional meetings and published from a multitude of sources. This book is the result. It is composed of a collection of research reports and essays by reputable scientists, economists, and legal experts as well as private property and free market activists.

The book is organized into seven parts: I. Environmentalism: The New State Religion; II. The New State Religion Debunked; III. Introduction to Environmental and Natural Resource Economics; IV. Interventionism: Law and Regulation; V. Pollution and Recycling; VI. Property Rights: Planning, Zoning and Eminent Domain; and VII. Free Market Conservation. It also includes an elaborate Bibliography, References and Recommended Reading section including an extensive Annotated Bibliography of related and works on the subject.

The intellectual level of the individual works ranges from quite scholarly to informed editorial opinion.

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What would it take to convince a climate realist?

A Handbook for Ranch Managers Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual Combat Shooter's HandbookReconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps InstituteThe Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View

FOLLOW FLYOVER PRESS ON FACEBOOK

Check out our WebSite

Check out our e-Store

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualPlanned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual. This is the ideal squeal to A Handbook for Ranch Managers.  Although the ecological principles remain the same, what was originally known as “The Savory Grazing Method” now answers to a multitude of different names: ranching for profit, holistic management, managed grazing, mob grazing, management intensive grazing, etc. Land & Livestock International, Inc. uses “Restoration Grazing” under its “Managing the Ranch as a Business” program.” No mater what you call it, this summary and synopsis will guide you step by step through the process and teach you how to use it as it was originally intended. No more excuses for failing to complete your grazing plans.

Posted in Climate Change, Global Warming, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment