Ranches for Sale

Land & Livestock International, Inc. Disclosure Statement:

Neither Land & Livestock International, Inc. nor any of its officers or directors are real estate brokers or licensed appraisers. We are trained and experienced range managers and range-livestock economists.

We do not accept any kind of “commission” or other fee based on a percentage of the transaction. We strictly represent the buyer for a negotiable hourly, daily, monthly, or annual consulting fee.

We assist the buyer in doing his/her due diligence including, but not limited to: generating a strategic plan for the ranching business, evaluating the carrying capacity of the land, acquiring cattle, grazing planning, land (infrastructure) planning, generating cash flow projections and break-even analyses, capital budgeting, negotiating the purchase, hiring, training and supervising operational level management, dealing with federal land management agencies and any other tasks necessary to the consummation of the purchase and the management of a successful business.

When you read these descriptions, you will know as much about these properties as we do. However, if you have specific questions, send them along and we will do our best to find the answers.

Contact Us  If the link won’t work for you, copy and paste the following email address onto the “To” line of your email: info@landandlivestockinternational.com 

Long Meadow Ranch
Prescott, Yavapai County, Arizona

The Long Meadow Ranch is one of the finest agricultural offerings in the Southwestern United States.  Located 22 miles northwest of downtown Prescott, the ranch’s 2,151.01± deeded acres include approximately 200± acres of irrigated land – of which 120± acres are sub-irrigated.  The balance of the land is tremendously productive native grass.  The ranch is located outside of the Prescott AMA and has an abundance of water with eight wells which produce between 10 and 550 GPM, there is also a Certificate of Water Adequacy from the Arizona Department of Water Resources for residential and non-residential uses of 3,156.4 acre feet annually.  This offering provides an excellent investment opportunity.  The ranch is highly improved and will allow a new owner substantial depreciation.  The ranch’s deeded land in conjunction with the adjacent Prescott National Forest grazing permit is rated at 200± head cow/calf year long.  The ranch has an excellent herd of predominantly black cattle.  In addition to the grazing, the ranch has historically baled fescue and red clover hay on the irrigated land.  The ranch is in an area of some of the most exclusive developments in northern Arizona such as American Ranch, Las Vegas Ranch, Talking Rock Ranch, Inscription Canyon Ranch and Crossroads Ranch making the ranch a great candidate for a conservation easement.  The Long Meadow is also favorable for the sportsman as it is home to one of the state’s premier antelope herds, chukker and pheasant have also been raised for hunting.  This ranch has it all and is offered turnkey for a new owner.  $14,500,000

Hacienda Amado Ranch
Patagonia, Santa Cruz County, Arizona

51 deeded acres, 21,607 acres USFS. $6,385,000

 

Circle Bar
23 deeded acre USFS inholding; 97,885 USFS grazing acres. 525 AU.

The Circle Bar Ranch is located northeast of Fountain Hills on both sides of S.R. 87, north of the Salt River and south of Sunflower, from Four Peaks on the east to the Fort McDowell Reservation to the west. $1,500,000

210 Acre Alpine Property
Alpine, Apache County, Arizona

±210 Acres in the heart of the beautiful mountain town of Alpine, AZ, bordering the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest. With highway frontage; private lake frontage along Judd Lake on the San Francisco River; 150 acre feet of transferrable irrigation rights; large, open meadowlands; and acreage in the tall Ponderosa Pines – this property would lend itself to multiple possibilities. Commercial, high end residential, equine properties, grazing, hunting and vacation rentals – take advantage of the opportunity to create something unique from this blank slate!

The property includes a house and seven cabins tucked into the pines along the north east side of Hwy 180, also known as the Coronado Trail. These cabins were traditionally used as vacation rentals and date back to the 1940’s. All buildings are in need of repair/remodel, but could possibly be restored and put back into use as vintage rentals. One cabin, located on the edge of town, is currently being rented as office space. Property also includes the historic barn and corrals. $8,748,000

“The Confluence”
Camp Verde, Yavapai County, Arizona
Confluence of Verde River and Beaver Creek

  • 61.2 acres at the Beaver Creek confluence with the Verde River
  • Outstanding riparian characteristics along two perennial waterways
  • Approximately bordered by 1/2 mile of Beaver Creek, 1/4 mile of Verde River and 1/2 mile of Coconino National Forest
  • Approximately up to 30 acres have been irrigated, with a line roll sprinkler on about 18 acres currently $2,400,000

202 Ranch
8 miles SE of Willcox – Cochise County, Arizona

The 202 Ranch consists of approximately 1,802 acres of private land.  It is very rare to find one hundred percent deeded land ranches in southeastern Arizona without state or federal grazing leases.  The approximate cattle carrying capacity is 30 head annually depending on rainfall. $1,100,000

Pat Hills Ranch
25 miles southeast of Willcox – Cochise County, Arizona

The Pat Hills Ranch consists of approximately 1,905 acres of private land.  It is very rare to find one hundred percent deeded land ranches in southeastern Arizona without state or federal grazing leases.  The approximate cattle carrying capacity is 30 head annually depending on rainfall. $1,100,000

Las Guijas Ranch
Aravaica – Pima County, Arizona

The Las Guijas Ranch is located in southeastern Arizona approximately 65 miles south of Tucson.  The property is approximately 1 mile northwest of Arivaca and is accessed via the Old Ruggles Road.

The Las Guijas Ranch is a one of the largest blocks of private land in the Arivaca area.  The topography creates many wonderful building sites with expansive views in many directions.  The canyon bisecting the property yields a very private area within the parcel.  This is a very unique property that is within an easy commute to Tucson. $325,000

Fouur Ranch
Dragoon – Cochise County, Arizona

1,280 acres deeded; Fouur Allotment State Lease. $3,000,000

 

23 Acre Benson Horse Property
Benson, Cochise County, Arizona

Built in 1991, Coyote Hill is a three bedroom, two bath, 2469 s.f. custom built home with horse facilities situated on approximately 23.59 acres. The unique, curved design highlights the beautiful views over the San Pedro Valley. $460,000

36 Acre Elgin Equestrian Estate
Elgin/Sonoita area – Santa Cruz County, Arizona

This beautiful home was designed and built with care and attention to detail.  With high-end finishes and set on 36+ acres of grassland, the property is priced below cost value to sell quickly. $975,000

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Awesome Pete

A Handbook for Ranch Managers I received this from my cyber friend, Montana Rancher and award winning novelist, John L Moore. It immediately impressed me as being something of interest to some of you guys. As John put it, it is a “sad and ironic ending.” — jtl

By John L. Moore

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual A decades-long era in Montana Quarter Horse breeding came to a sad and ironic end in south Texas recently when the Bob Shelhamer-bred stallion, Awesome Pete, succumbed to the floodwaters that devastated the Houston area.

A dark mahogany bay, Awesome Pete was foaled in the Musselshell country in 1996, the last and 23rd foal of the prodigious mare Gin Blaze and sired by Mr Pete Oswald by Oswald’s Pete by Oswald.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View  Oswald, born in Oklahoma in 1945, came from royalty. His sire was Johnny Barnes and his dam the famous Miss Chubby. He set a track record in winning the Oklahoma Futurity as a two-year-old then all but disappeared from sight. While on a horse-buying trip in Kansas in the 1950s, Shelhamer heard about the dark brown stallion but couldn’t locate him. According to area legend, the horse was match-raced several times a day, used in rodeos in the evenings, and hidden in a chicken house when not competing. Shelhamer may not have found him, but pioneer Montana breeder Walter Clark on Rosebud Creek did. Learning this, the two made a trade and Shelhamer acquired the stallion in 1961. A timid breeder, Shelhamer hand-bred Oswald and went against popular thinking by establishing a line-breeding program that produced many outstanding ranch and rodeo arena horses. The Oswald line became known for being exceptionally intelligent and stout-hearted horses that generally stood 15-3 and weighed 1300 pounds. They were almost always browns or bays, often with two hind socks. Some cowboys loved them, others cussed them. When provoked, some were known to buck. When they bucked they were usually unrideable.

Combat Shooter's Handbook Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsThe toughness and ability of the Oswalds caught the eye of well-known cowboy and horseman Lynne Taylor. He  purchased the three-year-old Awesome Pete to breed to his Roanys Tomcat (by High Rolling Roany) daughters. When Taylor passed away eight years ago, the majority of his horses sold through a Billings Livestock horse sale. Awesome Pete and a number of Taylor mares were purchased there by Texas breeder LeRoy J. Hauerland.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) Hauerland, a cutting horse enthusiast, had been looking for a stallion that could add bone and muscle to his Texas cutting horses without sacrificing the cow instinct. He was immediately smitten by Awesome Pete’s good looks and gentlemanly ways and the Montana stallion became the favorite of the south Texas ranch that includes noted cutting stallions Atta Cat and Playboy Boonsmal.

Back in Montana, the Oswald line found new media attention recently through a novel, a documentary, and the accomplishments of an aging barrel horse. My novel, Looking for Lynne, features the Oswald line prominently and won the silver medal in the 2015 Will Rogers Medallion Awards. His Name is Midnight, a documentary now on the film festival circuit, tells the story of a Montana-born Oswald gelding, Junior Midnight, that was rescued from near-death on the east coast and coaxed to an amazing recovery. This 1994 gelding was sired by Mr Pete Oswald and goes back to Oswald a second time through his maternal grand dam. Meanwhile, in Billings, the accomplishments of Lisa Hamilton’s 27-year-old barrel horse, Creepy Junior (a/k/a Big Brown) has drawn national attention. Creepy Junior, a 1989 gelding, was sired by Oswald’s Pete and out of a mare of Kramer breeding.

While there are Oswald-influenced stallions in the area — Loren Walker, Wilbur Reid and Gene Hetletved are among those who stand sons of Awesome Pete — the direct line to the old Oswald horse washed away in the 500-year-rain-event that struck the Houston area the night of April 16th. In the following 18 hours more than 21 inches of rain fell and in Houston alone, 280 billion gallons of water, enough to flow over Niagara Falls for 10 days, struck the city.

Hauerland and his son, Brad, run over 1500 cattle and 100 horses on a ranch that sits between East Bernard and Big Bernard Rivers. Both rivers left their banks quickly, washed out roads and bridges, and stranded livestock on knolls in the sandy prairie region, some with water up to their backs. The Hauerlands spotted Awesome Pete and his mare bunch Monday stranded on a small knoll, but despite heroic efforts horseback and with an oversized Army truck, they were unable to get to them. Tuesday, Brad Hauerland discovered Awesome Pete had bogged and down in an awkward position. As the waters receded, the big bay was extracted and taken to the ranch where he received veterinary care. Though it appeared early that he might recover, the stress had taken its toll on the aged horse and he was humanely put down Wednesday afternoon.

Why Awesome Pete bogged is a mystery, but having had the horse on my ranch for eight years I have my own speculation. An aggressive herder, he may have chased a mare from danger’s edge when he slipped into the loamy mud. The actual cause of death was likely stress and exertion. “He was like a great athlete that flat wore himself out,” Hauerland said. Of the Hauerlands’ many livestock, Awesome Pete was the only loss.

One thing is for certain, bred with a heart of fire and raised in the badlands, Awesome Pete (called “Bob” by his late owner, Lynne Taylor) did not succumb easily. It took a 500-year rain to extinguish his light.

The Hauerlands will continue their breeding program by breeding Awesome Pete offspring to Gumbo Gin Cake, a Ray Beecher-bred stallion with an Oswald influence.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View

edited by

Dr Jimmy T (Gunny) LaBaume

Is now available in both PAPERBACK and Kindle

BookCoverImageMurray N. Rothbard was the father of what some call Radical Libertarianism or Anarcho-Capitalism which Hans-Hermann Hoppe described as “Rothbard’s unique contribution to the rediscovery of property and property rights as the common foundation of both economics and political philosophy, and the systematic reconstruction and conceptual integration of modern, marginalist economics and natural-law political philosophy into a unified moral science: libertarianism.”

This book applies the principles of this “unified moral science” to environmental and natural resource management issues.

The book started out life as an assigned reading list for a university level course entitled Environmental and Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View.

As I began to prepare to teach the course, I quickly saw that there was a plethora of textbooks suitable for universal level courses dealing with environmental and natural resource economics. The only problem was that they were all based in mainstream neo-classical (or Keynesian) theory. I could find no single collection of material comprising a comprehensive treatment of environmental and natural resource economics based on Austrian Economic Theory.

However, I was able to find a large number of essays, monographs, papers delivered at professional meetings and published from a multitude of sources. This book is the result. It is composed of a collection of research reports and essays by reputable scientists, economists, and legal experts as well as private property and free market activists.

The book is organized into seven parts: I. Environmentalism: The New State Religion; II. The New State Religion Debunked; III. Introduction to Environmental and Natural Resource Economics; IV. Interventionism: Law and Regulation; V. Pollution and Recycling; VI. Property Rights: Planning, Zoning and Eminent Domain; and VII. Free Market Conservation. It also includes an elaborate Bibliography, References and Recommended Reading section including an extensive Annotated Bibliography of related and works on the subject.

The intellectual level of the individual works ranges from quite scholarly to informed editorial opinion.

FOLLOW LAND & LIVESTOCK INTERNATIONAL ON FACEBOOK

Check out our WebSite

Check out our Online Rancher Supply Store

Posted in Horses, Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Utah official: BLM ‘impotent’ to deal with wild horse problem

Across the West, the number of wild horses and burros that have been adopted over the past three years has remained stagnant, putting pressure on the agency to find places for these animals to go. The agency keeps nearly 47,000 of the animals in holding pens at a cost of $49 million a year. Capacity is 57,819 animals.

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersEasy solution. Make them private property and re-open the horse slaughter plants. Problem solved. Some have suggested that they be transported to Wyoming and Montana where the government’s wolves need a food source.

Regardless, Madeline Pickens, et al of her likes should be tethered to an Alpha Male and drug to death. — jtl, 419

By Amy Joi O’Donoghue, Deseret News

Horses run in a corral as officials from the Bureau of Land Management’s Wild Horse and Burro Program show the 32 acre off-range corral on Monday, Sept. 14, 2015, in Axtell Utah. The property is owned and operated by Kerry Despain and his family – Scott G Winterton, Deseret News

 Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual SALT LAKE CITY — A frustrated Beaver County commissioner complained to a top U.S. Department of Interior official that the agency is like a gelded horse and “impotent” to solve the wild horse problem in the West.

Jim Lyons, deputy assistant secretary under Interior Secretary Sally Jewell, was in town last week to talk sage grouse management. But he received an earful about the wild horse population problem in Utah.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View“This is the worst managed horse population, but you guys always seem to pick on grazers,” complained Beaver County Commissioner Mark Whitney in a Friday exchange with Lyons. “It has to come down from Congress. Congress has to step it up. … You guys are like a gelded horse. You’re impotent. They do not give you the skills to manage this problem.”

Combat Shooter's Handbook Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsLyons did not disagree on the agency’s challenges.

“We recognize the problem with the wild horses,” he said. “We don’t have the resources.”

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) Afterward, Lyons said it’s clear Western leaders need answers.

“Obviously we will set to work up a briefing,” he said. “The wild horse and burro problem is a significant issue when it comes to sage grouse. My worry also is that the (overpopulation) results in poor rangeland conditions, and in some ways that is inhumane. We simply don’t have the capacity.”

Whitney said he’s been to Washington, D.C., twice and is meeting Tuesday with Neal Kornze, the Bureau of Land Management’s national director, to again plead for action on Utah’s wild horse population problem.

Range population estimates of wild horses and burros in 10 Western states as of March 2015 are 58,150, well above the BLM’s targeted levels of 26,715, according to the agency. In Utah, the appropriate management level for wild horses and burros is 1,956, but there are more than twice that many animals — 4,906.

The BLM said the animals’ population grew by 18 percent from 2014 to 2015, with authorities struggling to find ways to stem the growing numbers. A 2013 report by the National Academy of Sciences concluded that there were no highly effective, easily delivered and affordable fertility control methods available, and more science needs to be applied to arrive at a solution.

Whitney and rural county leaders from Utah say they’ve gotten nowhere in their meetings with Kornze, and Barry McLerran, a staffer with the office of Rep. Mia Love, R-Utah, told Lyons a November letter to Kornze from several Western senators and members of Congress has gone unanswered.

The letter seeks a variety of answers from Kornze, including options on how to curb population trends in wild horse management areas and how much it would cost.

“We believe that it is clear that the current management strategy of wild horses and burros has proven ineffective,” the letter dated Nov. 4 reads. “Wildfire, drought and invasive species exacerbate poor range conditions caused by overstocked (management) areas.”

Beaver County, Iron County and a coalition of private land owners that include ranchers filed suit against the agency over the wild horse populations, and the Utah School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration also sued the federal government alleging the wild horses were causing damage to more than a half million acres of trust lands within the state.

That suit has since been withdrawn in light of an agreement reached between the trust lands administration and the BLM to prioritize wild horse removal in the south-central portions of Utah. The agreement is subject to congressional funding.

Across the West, the number of wild horses and burros that have been adopted over the past three years has remained stagnant, putting pressure on the agency to find places for these animals to go. The agency keeps nearly 47,000 of the animals in holding pens at a cost of $49 million a year. Capacity is 57,819 animals.

Utah’s first private holding facility opened in 2015, caring for several hundred starving and dehydrated horses from a management area in Nevada challenged by drought. The Sanpete ranch has capacity for 1,000 horses, and the BLM in Utah also received a proposal to allow an off-range pasture in the Fountain Green area that can hold about 700 horses.

The agency is also proposing to do a roundup and carry out a wide-scale research effort involving wild horses in the Conger and Frisco herd management areas in Beaver and Millard counties. The project is part of 21 throughout the West being funded at a cost of $11 million. Researchers from the U.S. Geological Survey’s Fort Collins Science Center, as well Colorado State University, will look at gelding stallions as a potential option, fertility rates and other herd dynamics.

Email: amyjoi@deseretnews.com  Twitter: amyjoi16

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View

edited by

Dr Jimmy T (Gunny) LaBaume

Is now available in both PAPERBACK and Kindle

BookCoverImageMurray N. Rothbard was the father of what some call Radical Libertarianism or Anarcho-Capitalism which Hans-Hermann Hoppe described as “Rothbard’s unique contribution to the rediscovery of property and property rights as the common foundation of both economics and political philosophy, and the systematic reconstruction and conceptual integration of modern, marginalist economics and natural-law political philosophy into a unified moral science: libertarianism.”

This book applies the principles of this “unified moral science” to environmental and natural resource management issues.

The book started out life as an assigned reading list for a university level course entitled Environmental and Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View.

As I began to prepare to teach the course, I quickly saw that there was a plethora of textbooks suitable for universal level courses dealing with environmental and natural resource economics. The only problem was that they were all based in mainstream neo-classical (or Keynesian) theory. I could find no single collection of material comprising a comprehensive treatment of environmental and natural resource economics based on Austrian Economic Theory.

However, I was able to find a large number of essays, monographs, papers delivered at professional meetings and published from a multitude of sources. This book is the result. It is composed of a collection of research reports and essays by reputable scientists, economists, and legal experts as well as private property and free market activists.

The book is organized into seven parts: I. Environmentalism: The New State Religion; II. The New State Religion Debunked; III. Introduction to Environmental and Natural Resource Economics; IV. Interventionism: Law and Regulation; V. Pollution and Recycling; VI. Property Rights: Planning, Zoning and Eminent Domain; and VII. Free Market Conservation. It also includes an elaborate Bibliography, References and Recommended Reading section including an extensive Annotated Bibliography of related and works on the subject.

The intellectual level of the individual works ranges from quite scholarly to informed editorial opinion.

FOLLOW LAND & LIVESTOCK INTERNATIONAL ON FACEBOOK

Check out our WebSite

Check out our Online Rancher Supply Store

Posted in Uncategorized, Wild Horses | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Want your pastures to handle a drought year? Do things the ‘redneck’ way

A handy mnemonic for this ranching method is ‘grass’ — 
graze period, rest period, animal impact, and stock density

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual This is a pretty good explanation of the “general” principles. Now you need to get yourself a pack of Holistic Management’s Grazing Plans and let me teach you how to use them in a way that takes all the “guess work” our of it. If you are the type that can teach yourself by reading, the minute details can be found in the book, Planned Grazing. — jtl

Steve and Amber Kenyon, along with their four kids, keep things unconventional 
on their ranch near Busby.
Steve and Amber Kenyon, along with their four kids, keep things unconventional 
on their ranch near Busby. Photo: Courtesy of the Kenyon family

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersBy via Alberta Farmer Express

The first thing ‘redneck ranchers’ plant is a post.

“That’s why we call it ‘redneck ranching’ — we definitely don’t work in the same manner as the conventional method,” said Amber Kenyon, who operates Greener Pastures Ranching with husband Steve and their four children.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View“You need to start putting fences in and moving the animals around on pasture.”

The Kenyons, who operate a 1,200-head custom grazing operation near Busby, use four grazing concepts when moving their animals.

“I remember them as ‘grass’ — graze period, rest period, animal impact, and stock density,” Kenyon said at the Wildrose Bison Convention in March.

Combat Shooter's Handbook Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits“If you can remember that, it will help you remember how often you’re supposed to move them and how many animals are supposed to be on your land.”

Graze periods are strictly a measurement of time — the shorter the better, she said.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) “Basically, you want to make sure your animals are not taking a second bite off the tops of plants,” she said. “You can overgraze your paddocks by having 10 animals out on a quarter of land year round. You can also do mob grazing and have a ton of animals on one small piece, but if they’re not out there for very long, you’re not overgrazing.”

Rest periods go “hand in hand” with graze periods.

“With the rest period, you want to make sure the pasture has a chance to replenish itself before you ever put animals back on it,” said Kenyon.

“You’re basically rotationally abusing your land if you’re not giving it enough of a rest period.”

Animal impact refers to how the cattle work the earth while they’re on it. “We think that every piece of land should have animals on it, even if it’s cropland. You need animals to stimulate the soil to get everything moving.”

And finally, stock density is the number of animals in a paddock at any given time.

“You want to make sure there’s equal plant utilization and manure distribution,” she said.

“You want to have enough animals on that they’re all going to take one bite off the top of each plant before you move them, but no more than that.

“You also want to have that manure spread evenly over so that you don’t end up having to go and rake it. You can just move off and have those nutrients go back into the soil.”

By following these grazing principles, the Kenyons have been better able to manage weeds and collect moisture, especially in a drought year like 2015.

“Last year was a pretty hard drought, and I’m guessing this year is going to be the same,” said Kenyon. “Because we leave that residue, we’re holding on to all the snow that’s come. That way, we’re not going to have pasture problems come the middle of summer when there’s a drought.”

In a drought year, it can be tough to balance the needs of the animals with the needs of the land, she said. But ranchers should leave “as much residue as they can cash flow.”

“In the past year with the drought, we did take down our pastures harder than what we would have in a normal year,” she said. “We need to make sure the animals are fed and that we still have an income coming in.

“But because we spent the last 10 years making sure those pastures were in good shape, we can do that for one or even two years. Nature will forgive one mistake. She just won’t forgive the same mistake over and over and over again.”

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View

edited by

Dr Jimmy T (Gunny) LaBaume

Is now available in both PAPERBACK and Kindle

BookCoverImageMurray N. Rothbard was the father of what some call Radical Libertarianism or Anarcho-Capitalism which Hans-Hermann Hoppe described as “Rothbard’s unique contribution to the rediscovery of property and property rights as the common foundation of both economics and political philosophy, and the systematic reconstruction and conceptual integration of modern, marginalist economics and natural-law political philosophy into a unified moral science: libertarianism.”

This book applies the principles of this “unified moral science” to environmental and natural resource management issues.

The book started out life as an assigned reading list for a university level course entitled Environmental and Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View.

As I began to prepare to teach the course, I quickly saw that there was a plethora of textbooks suitable for universal level courses dealing with environmental and natural resource economics. The only problem was that they were all based in mainstream neo-classical (or Keynesian) theory. I could find no single collection of material comprising a comprehensive treatment of environmental and natural resource economics based on Austrian Economic Theory.

However, I was able to find a large number of essays, monographs, papers delivered at professional meetings and published from a multitude of sources. This book is the result. It is composed of a collection of research reports and essays by reputable scientists, economists, and legal experts as well as private property and free market activists.

The book is organized into seven parts: I. Environmentalism: The New State Religion; II. The New State Religion Debunked; III. Introduction to Environmental and Natural Resource Economics; IV. Interventionism: Law and Regulation; V. Pollution and Recycling; VI. Property Rights: Planning, Zoning and Eminent Domain; and VII. Free Market Conservation. It also includes an elaborate Bibliography, References and Recommended Reading section including an extensive Annotated Bibliography of related and works on the subject.

The intellectual level of the individual works ranges from quite scholarly to informed editorial opinion.

FOLLOW LAND & LIVESTOCK INTERNATIONAL ON FACEBOOK

Check out our WebSite

Check out our Online Rancher Supply Store

Posted in Planned Grazing, Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

U.S. sidelined judge who ruled for key rancher against Feds, rejected same-sex marriage

 Hage said the 9th Circuit ruling “is a big disappointment, not just for my family but for the entire industry. They felt relief at the Jones decision. Ranchers’ rights had been upheld, but now it has all been overturned. It looks to me like the 9th Circuit just swelled the ranks of the militias.”

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersTypical of the States “justice” system. Someday, they will load the final straw and bad things will happen. — jtl, 419

Special to WorldTribune.com

The U.S. government has downgraded a judge who had ruled in favor of a Nevada rancher and against the Feds.

Reno judge Robert Clive Jones, appointed by President George W. Bush in 2003, has repeatedly clashed with the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals not only on the rancher case but on the gay marriage issue.Judge Robert Clive Jones

Judge Robert Clive Jones

Jones is being relegated to what is called “senior status,” making him a part-time judge.

In a decades-long dispute between the government and the E. Wayne Hage family’s Pine Creek Ranch near Tonopah, Jones had ruled in favor of the rancher.

 Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual The case is well known in the West among property rights advocates who charge the government “exercises a heavy hand” in relations with those who make their livelihood off the land, a report in the Las Vegas Review-Journal said.

At issue was whether Hage, who is now deceased, and his son, Wayne Hage, who is currently defending the case, had grazed cattle on federal land without authorization.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewJones ruled in favor of the Hages and the appeals court overturned the decision, citing Jones’s bias.

“Defendants openly trespassed on federal lands. Rather than simply resolving the fact-specific inquiries as to when and where the cattle grazed illegally, the district court applied an ‘easement by necessity’ theory that plainly contravenes the law,” the 9th Circuit panel wrote in an opinion authored by Judge Susan Graber.

Combat Shooter's Handbook Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits“The district court also encouraged defendants to file a counterclaim that was clearly time-barred. … Moreover, as discussed more fully in a separate disposition filed today, the court grossly abused the power of contempt by holding two federal agency officials in contempt of court for taking ordinary, lawful actions that had no effect whatsoever on this case.”

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)  The defendants argued that, because they had water rights, a necessary easement over federal lands to get their cattle to the water was implied.

In a separate opinion that is not published, the appeals court reversed contempt citations Jones made against the Bureau of Land Management and U.S. Forest Service employees, the Review-Journal reported.

Hage said the 9th Circuit ruling “is a big disappointment, not just for my family but for the entire industry. They felt relief at the Jones decision. Ranchers’ rights had been upheld, but now it has all been overturned. It looks to me like the 9th Circuit just swelled the ranks of the militias.”

On April 19, Chief U.S. District Judge Gloria Navarro in Nevada assigned the Hage case to herself.

Several of Jones’s other high-profile decisions in recent years have been overturned by the 9th Circuit. His rejection of same-sex marriage in Nevada in 2012 was reversed in 2014, as was his 2012 effort to pull “None of These Candidates” off Nevada ballots.

Jones also was overturned in September 2015 when the 9th Circuit revived a lawsuit against the Nevada Health and Human Services Department over the issue of disenfranchising potential low-income and disabled voters.

The full-time position Jones is vacating will be filled by presidential appointment, according to Carl Tobias, a professor at the University of Richmond School of Law in Virginia. A nominee likely won’t be confirmed by the U.S. Senate until 2017 because of the election year, Tobias said.

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Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualPlanned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual. This is the ideal squeal to A Handbook for Ranch Managers.  Although the ecological principles remain the same, what was originally known as “The Savory Grazing Method” now answers to a multitude of different names: ranching for profit, holistic management, managed grazing, mob grazing, management intensive grazing, etc. Land & Livestock International, Inc. uses “Restoration Grazing” under its “Managing the Ranch as a Business” program.” No mater what you call it, this summary and synopsis will guide you step by step through the process and teach you how to use it as it was originally intended. No more excuses for failing to complete your grazing plans.

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Why early New Mexico turned from cattle to sheep

images-1

via Richard Beals Blog

The premier New Mexico historian Marc Simmons wrote recently in the Santa Fe New Mexican.

The story of the beginnings of New Mexico’s livestock industry is preserved in A Handbook for Ranch Managerslong-buried Spanish documents, found scattered in the state’s rich archives. It forms an important chapter in the region’s history of economic development.

Explorer Coronado brought the initial small herd of cattle to the upper Rio Grande in 1540. But those animals were intended as “a walking commissary,” that is, they were used as food by soldiers of the expedition. Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual 

Another herd came with the first permanent settlers, who arrived at the end of the 16th century. These “seed” cattle survived and became the foundation of New Mexico’s stock raising industry.Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View

Soon large ranching operations, called estancias, were flourishing upon pasturelands bracketing the river. They ran, about equally, both ganado mayor (cattle and horses), and ganado menor (sheep and goats).

Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits Combat Shooter's Handbook The colonial New Mexicans raised two recognizable breeds of cattle. The most numerous was the Criollo, a native American type that had emerged with the mixing of original breeds from Spain.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) Many Criollos had hair of solid colors, particularly Jersey tan and red. But spotted or piebald coats, most often black-and-white, were common, too.

Strangely, southern Plains Indians, living adjacent to New Mexico, held European bovines sacred, in the same manner as buffalo. Therefore, it is not surprising that they painted spotted Spanish cattle on their shields and tepees.

The second early breed introduced on the Rio Grande was the Black Andalusian, native to southern Spain but probably with roots in Africa. Some of these dark cattle escaped to the wild. The Hopi Indians were said to own a herd of Andalusian purebreds as late as 1782.

Soon after that, however, the breed disappeared from the Southwest. It had been hugely outnumbered by the Criollos, which absorbed its blood.

Interestingly, New Mexico’s cattle population as a whole declined drastically in the later colonial years. It was replaced by booming sheep production.

So, why did the New Mexicans abandon their cows and become wool-raisers? Nothing like that happened in neighboring Spanish provinces.

On the cactus flats of south Texas, the tough longhorn cattle thrived in the face of thorns and predators. That was no country for sheep.

Spanish California, on the other hand, had a benign environment, suitable for either animal. But the Franciscan missionaries chose to raise cattle, which easily multiplied by the tens of thousands.

Several reasons exist to explain why New Mexico went with sheep. One is that the hostile Indians in their raids preferred to steal cattle, since they were easy to drive long distances.

Only the Navajos were interested in sheep, and while they stole large numbers to build up their own flocks, the thefts put only a small dent in the total held by New Mexicans.

At the first sign of Indian attack, the native shepherds had instructions to scatter the flock. Raiders, always in a hurry, would gather what they could and ride on.

When the owner came, he might find his shepherds dead, but he could send the dogs out to seek and round up what was left of his sheep. Had they been cattle, he would have suffered a total loss.

Another factor favoring sheep: By the 1700s the majority of New Mexicans lived, not on grand estancias, but on small subsistence farms. Their fields were unfenced and it was fairly simple to keep sheep away from the crops, since shepherds were with them all the time.

Cattle, however, were usually turned out to fend for themselves and they had a long history of getting into the farmer’s plot and eating up his winter supply of grain. For that reason, many rural folk preferred keeping sheep.

An exception, however, had to be made for draft cattle. Every family needed a team of oxen to pull the plow and also the cart used to get the crops out of the field.

New American breeds of beef cattle and oxen flooded into New Mexico after 1850. By the end of the century, the local strain of the Criollo was gone from the upper Rio Grande, marking the end of a romantic chapter in our ranching history.

Now in semi-retirement, author Marc Simmons wrote a weekly history column for more than 35 years. The New Mexican is publishing reprints from among the more than 1,800 columns he produced during his career.

 

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersA Handbook for Ranch Managers.  In keeping with the “holistic” idea that the land, the livestock, the people and the money should be viewed as a single integrated whole: Part I deals with the management of the natural resources. Part II covers livestock production and Part III deals with the people and the money. Not only would this book make an excellent basic text for a university program in Ranch Management, no professional ranch manager’s reference bookshelf should be without it. It is a comprehensive reference manual for managing the working ranch. The information in the appendices and extensive bibliography alone is worth the price of the book.

You might also be interested in the supplement to this Handbook: Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual.

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Taking grazing-management tips from Mother Nature

A Handbook for Ranch Managers Gabe Brown says his success in cover  cropping has come through 
observing and mimicking nature’s processes

North Dakota producer, Gabe Brown spoke on cover crops and soil health strategies at the Ducks Unlimited grazing club event  in Lenore on April 6.
North Dakota producer, Gabe Brown spoke on cover crops and soil health strategies at the Ducks Unlimited grazing club event in Lenore on April 6. Photo: Jennifer PaigePlanned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual

North Dakota farmer and cover crop and soil health expert Gabe Brown says if farmers give the techniques he advocates an honest try they’ll be hooked.

Gabe Brown

“Take one field and promise yourself that for five years you will focus on the principles of soil health,” said Brown. If you stick with it for those five years, you will be so amazed at the change in that soil. You’ll become sold on these techniques.”Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View

Brown spoke to a full house at a Ducks Unlimited grazing club event at the Lenore community hall April 6. He said soil health is the top priority on his farm east of Bismarck, North Dakota. He practises holistic management, no till, diverse cropping strategies and rotational grazing.

Combat Shooter's Handbook Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits“Farming is so much more enjoyable when we can solve problems for good as opposed to Band-Aid solutions that cost us money and don’t last,” said Brown.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) Over the past 20 years on 5,000 acres of leased and owned land, Brown has transformed what he describes as severely degraded soil into soil that is organically dense and full of microbial activity.

This transformation has reduced his dependence on chemicals, reduced erosion and compaction issues and increased water absorption.

“I have completely eliminated the use of synthetic fertilizers, fungicides, and pesticides and do not use GMO or glyphosate. I prefer signing the back of the cheque instead of the front,” Brown said.

He began exploring holistic management and soil health as a way to financially survive after four dismal crop years.

“We went through four years of hail and drought and I lost four crops in a row. The bank wouldn’t lend me money to buy any inputs. At the time, I was also doing some rotational grazing and seeing some benefits to my native rangeland. I really just started observing that system and it all came about from that.”

Look to nature

Brown explains that the premise of his practices are simply mimicking nature and looking at how the soil was created and maintained before it became degraded by conventional agriculture.

“Think of how our soils were developed over eons of time. In the central plains that Manitoba is a part of, there were large herds of bison and elk that wolves were moving,” he said. “They would graze an area and then they wouldn’t come back for a long time. In essence it was high-density grazing, followed by long periods of recovery.”

cattle grazing

photo: Wendy Dudley

He described how the plant community on those prairie soils had tremendous amounts of diversity that continually collected sunlight.

“That sunlight collection pumped carbon down into the soil to create this healthy soil ecosystem that was sustainable. What we have done is come in and destroyed that,” Brown said. “All I am doing now is trying to mimic nature and return our soils to a less degraded state.”

For those starting out with new management practices, Brown says the most important this is to keep an open mind and don’t be afraid of trial and error.

“People just need to be open minded and they will find things that work. The best place to start is to just look at nature,” he said. “Study how soil functions, mimic nature and then try and fit aspects of that into your operation.”

In terms of his own success, he says attending field tours and learning from those who are having success with desired production methods has made all the difference.

“We are all busy but I am never too busy to stop and go on a tour because I know I am going to pick something up,” he said.

Brown told attendees the DU grazing club events and grazing clubs co-ordinator Michael Thiele’s work promoting the concept and organizing events was especially praiseworthy.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View

edited by

Dr Jimmy T (Gunny) LaBaume

Is now available in both PAPERBACK and Kindle

BookCoverImageMurray N. Rothbard was the father of what some call Radical Libertarianism or Anarcho-Capitalism which Hans-Hermann Hoppe described as “Rothbard’s unique contribution to the rediscovery of property and property rights as the common foundation of both economics and political philosophy, and the systematic reconstruction and conceptual integration of modern, marginalist economics and natural-law political philosophy into a unified moral science: libertarianism.”

This book applies the principles of this “unified moral science” to environmental and natural resource management issues.

The book started out life as an assigned reading list for a university level course entitled Environmental and Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View.

As I began to prepare to teach the course, I quickly saw that there was a plethora of textbooks suitable for universal level courses dealing with environmental and natural resource economics. The only problem was that they were all based in mainstream neo-classical (or Keynesian) theory. I could find no single collection of material comprising a comprehensive treatment of environmental and natural resource economics based on Austrian Economic Theory.

However, I was able to find a large number of essays, monographs, papers delivered at professional meetings and published from a multitude of sources. This book is the result. It is composed of a collection of research reports and essays by reputable scientists, economists, and legal experts as well as private property and free market activists.

The book is organized into seven parts: I. Environmentalism: The New State Religion; II. The New State Religion Debunked; III. Introduction to Environmental and Natural Resource Economics; IV. Interventionism: Law and Regulation; V. Pollution and Recycling; VI. Property Rights: Planning, Zoning and Eminent Domain; and VII. Free Market Conservation. It also includes an elaborate Bibliography, References and Recommended Reading section including an extensive Annotated Bibliography of related and works on the subject.

The intellectual level of the individual works ranges from quite scholarly to informed editorial opinion.

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