We’re All Welfare Queens Now

 …the issue is more complicated than it seems… Feeding people was only one side of the equation back in 1939. The other side was to help farmers sell “surplus” food. That’s why, even today, the U.S. Agriculture Department administers food stamps.

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualAs Henry Hazlett said, there is always “the seen and the unseen.” Considering all the secondary and tertiary (ripple) effects and the complex web of the economy, we are all “welfare queens” in one form or another.

But, although I take no pleasure in pointing it out, American A Handbook for Ranch Managersagriculture is probably the biggest welfare recipient on earth. Food stamps = Welfare for cowboys.

…when you let government make decisions that should be market-driven, you will receive inefficiency, waste and sub-optimal results.

Yep, what is really sad that we would be so much more productive without the influence of government interventionism. Get out of our way and we will show you how it is done. — jtl, 419

STAFF NEWS & ANALYSIS from The Daily Bell

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewIn 2013, Fox News proudly broadcast an interview with a young food stamp recipient who claimed to be using the government benefit to purchase lobster and sushi.

“This is the way I want to live and I don’t really see anything changing,” Jason Greenslate explained to Fox. “It’s free food; it’s awesome.”

Combat Shooter's HandbookReconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps InstituteThe Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsThat story fit a longtime conservative suspicion that poor people use food stamps to purchase luxury items. Now, a Republican state lawmaker in Missouri is pushing for legislation that would stop people like Greenslate and severely limit what food stamp recipients can buy. The bill being proposed would ban the purchase with food stamps of “cookies, chips, energy drinks, soft drinks, seafood or steak.”

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) “The intention of the bill is to get the food stamp program back to its original intent, which is nutrition assistance,” said Rick Brattin, the representative who is sponsoring the proposed legislation. – Washington Post, April 3, 2015

Limited government advocates may find a certain emotional satisfaction in proposals like that of Rep. Brattin. If we must have programs like food stamps, let’s at least attach some reasonable restrictions. Taxpayers shouldn’t have to shower luxury items on those the government deems unfortunate.

On further thought, however, the issue is more complicated than it seems.

Mr. Brattin is only half-right about the food stamp program’s original intent. Feeding people was only one side of the equation back in 1939. The other side was to help farmers sell “surplus” food. That’s why, even today, the U.S. Agriculture Department administers food stamps.

Was that food truly “surplus”? Free-market economics 101 says no. The fact that a market-clearing price is below the level farmers think they deserve does not mean the market failed. It means the farmers overproduced. Programs that encourage overproduction deliver no net benefit to society.

Nevertheless, if helping food producers is the program’s true purpose, why exclude those who produce cookies, chips, energy drinks, soft drinks, seafood or steak? Are they less deserving than broccoli and tofu farmers?

The proposal is fiscally questionable as well. If the goal is to deliver maximum calories to the poor at minimal cost to taxpayers, then food stamps should cover only cookies, chips and soft drinks. Encouraging the poor to live on free-range chicken and organic kale might help their health but is far more costly in the short term.

We could also reasonably ask why this idea should stop with food stamps. Maybe we should forbid government employees from using their pay to buy cigarettes and soft drinks. It isn’t good for their health and taxpayers will end up paying for expensive medical care.

The same principle might apply to Social Security recipients, veterans, defense contractors, hospital administrators, pharmaceutical executives and anyone else who depends on taxpayers for all or part of their income.

We can chase this rabbit all day, of course. The broader point is that when you let government make decisions that should be market-driven, you will receive inefficiency, waste and sub-optimal results.

Worse, some of the waste is intentional. Food stamps (or the politically correct SNAP) is arguably welfare for Cargill and Conagra. Such firms are its greatest beneficiaries and fiercest defenders.

One man’s welfare is another man’s profit margin. In various ways, we are all on both sides of the fence. That’s why it is so hard to change the system. One way or another, most of the population are welfare queens.

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Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualPlanned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual. This is the ideal squeal to A Handbook for Ranch Managers.  Although the ecological principles remain the same, what was originally known as “The Savory Grazing Method” now answers to a multitude of different names: ranching for profit, holistic management, managed grazing, mob grazing, management intensive grazing, etc. Land & Livestock International, Inc. uses “Restoration Grazing” under its “Managing the Ranch as a Business” program.” No mater what you call it, this summary and synopsis will guide you step by step through the process and teach you how to use it as it was originally intended. No more excuses for failing to complete your grazing plans.

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FIP Establishes Dedicated Fund for Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewLet me provide you an (over) simplified version of how things like this come about, what always happens and why. The broad, catch all moniker is “foreign aid.”

Outfits like the World Bank, Inter-American Development Bank, USAID et al declare that they are going to “save the world and all the little children” by funding (with loans) a feel good project in, say, 3rd World Fly Farm A.

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersSo, they approach one of the top notch “consulting firms” located in Washington DC to do an economic “feasibility” study. So the firm sends a representative to the country to produce the study which has the “real” purpose of convincing the country’s “leadership” that the project will make him a hero amongst his people while also making him very very rich personally. 

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualThis argument is persuasive so he signs the contract (borrows the money by pledging the lives, liberty and property of his subjects). The contract always requires mandatory use of uSSA engineering and construction firms, consultants, equipment, materials, etc.

Sure enough. Due to graft, corruption, cost over-runs, etc. the project The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)fails. That leaves the little dictator of Fly Farm A at the mercy of his now, not so “benevolent,” old Uncle Sam. And the uSSA government’s empire has grown by one Fly Farm.

Meantime, millions (in most cases, billions) of uS$ have never left the country but have circulated among different bank accounts in Washington, DC while the rich get richer and the poor get kids.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2)So now you know why they “hate us because we are free.” (Sarcasm, in case you didn’t notice.)

Don’t believe me? Read Confessions of an Economic Hit Man by John Perkins

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)BTW, I was alerted to this website by a post on LinkedIn from the Savory Institute. Now you know why real cowboys keep their distance from One Worlder’s.–jtl, 419

wb_cif_ci31 March 2015: The World Bank has approved a climate investment mechanism to be implemented by indigenous peoples and local communities seeking to address deforestation and forest degradation.

The Dedicated Grant Mechanism (DGM) for Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities is funded through the Climate Investment Funds (CIF) Forest Investment Program (FIP). The DGM is unique in that it targets forest-  Combat Shooter's HandbookReconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps InstituteThe Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfitsdependent communities, which will be responsible for project design and implementation. In doing so the fund aims to put forest conservation in the hands of local people while increasing the capacity of indigenous peoples and local communities’ representatives to participate in REDD+ climate negotiations and financing decisions.

Conservation International has been selected as the Global Executing Agency for the DGM and responsible agency for knowledge sharing and learning. Projects have already been approved in Brazil and globally for a learning support project with proposals under development in Burkina Faso, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and Peru. [Website: Dedicated Grant Mechanism] [World Bank Press Release] [Conservation International Press Release]

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View

edited by

Dr Jimmy T (Gunny) LaBaume

Is now available in both PAPERBACK and Kindle

BookCoverImageMurray N. Rothbard was the father of what some call Radical Libertarianism or Anarcho-Capitalism which Hans-Hermann Hoppe described as “Rothbard’s unique contribution to the rediscovery of property and property rights as the common foundation of both economics and political philosophy, and the systematic reconstruction and conceptual integration of modern, marginalist economics and natural-law political philosophy into a unified moral science: libertarianism.”

This book applies the principles of this “unified moral science” to environmental and natural resource management issues.

The book started out life as an assigned reading list for a university level course entitled Environmental and Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View.

As I began to prepare to teach the course, I quickly saw that there was a plethora of textbooks suitable for universal level courses dealing with environmental and natural resource economics. The only problem was that they were all based in mainstream neo-classical (or Keynesian) theory. I could find no single collection of material comprising a comprehensive treatment of environmental and natural resource economics based on Austrian Economic Theory.

However, I was able to find a large number of essays, monographs, papers delivered at professional meetings and published from a multitude of sources. This book is the result. It is composed of a collection of research reports and essays by reputable scientists, economists, and legal experts as well as private property and free market activists.

The book is organized into seven parts: I. Environmentalism: The New State Religion; II. The New State Religion Debunked; III. Introduction to Environmental and Natural Resource Economics; IV. Interventionism: Law and Regulation; V. Pollution and Recycling; VI. Property Rights: Planning, Zoning and Eminent Domain; and VII. Free Market Conservation. It also includes an elaborate Bibliography, References and Recommended Reading section including an extensive Annotated Bibliography of related and works on the subject.

The intellectual level of the individual works ranges from quite scholarly to informed editorial opinion.

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To rejuvenate a pasture focus on legumes and weeds

High-intensity/low-frequency grazing was the most effective system for the grasses to remain competitive

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersWell Duh… You won’t have any trouble figuring out what is wrong here. – jtl

Calf eating musk thistle
‘High-intensity/low-frequency grazing produced the most forage and fewer thistles.’ – Dr. Ed Bork, University of Alberta Photo: Supplied

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualGraeme Finn and his wife Heather rent 3,200 acres of pasture on long-term lease to graze 1,000 yearlings and their beef cow herd year round near Madden, Alta.

They rely on intensive rotational grazing of high-legume and annual crop pastures so you can understand why each pasture was assessed for potential productivity before it was rented.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewIn the past, most of those pastures required major rejuvenation primarily to get rid of the weeds, particularly thistles.

“I mainly sod seed my pastures,” explains Graeme. “My goal is to start off with a clean seedbed and for weed control and existing vegetation control I use a fall and/or spring burn-off with glyphosate. If chemicals will help me, I will use them,” says Graeme. “My planting depth is critical and I aim for seeding at one-half inch in depth.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) “I seed a very heavy mixture of different legumes mainly alfalfa, vetch and sainfoin with the grass. The more legumes the better… like up to 60 per cent. The vetch and sainfoin help to prevent bloat. When I am sod seeding, I Combat Shooter's HandbookReconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps InstituteThe Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfitslike to use 10 pounds per acre of a grass blend of AC Knowles hybrid bromegrass, smooth leaf tall fescue and orchardgrass. The legume mixture of Splendor 4 alfalfa, Veldt milk vetch and sainfoin is seeded at five pounds an acre. After a couple of years there is more vetch and sainfoin repopulating in the stand. I find that a mixture of grasses and legumes gives me the best milk production and weight gains for my grazing cattle. Do not be afraid of using legumes; with grazing management they can be the best thing for your pastures.

“I still have lots of alfalfa in my pastures after 10 years. I don’t graze my pastures like a hay mower. I have lots of plant height left at the end of the grazing period to be used as solar panels for future plant growth.

“I firmly believe that in my area it is essential to not graze the newly seeded pasture for the next 12 months. This is critical and I have found that this long initial rest period will extend the life of my pastures for up to 10 to 12 years. Depending on the situation, I will graze the new stand in the late fall or stockpile graze it lightly in the winter. I have a grazing plan where the cattle will graze while the newly seeded pasture is locked out for the year’s rest period.”

Sod seeding using a direct-seed drill at six- to seven-inch spacings costs about $62 per acre for chemical plus seed. If he has to break the old pasture and cultivate before seeding, his costs climb closer to $150 plus seed.

“High-quality forage has low fibre, high protein and tastes good. The sugars in the plant are the immediate product of photosynthesis which hasn’t yet been incorporated into the plant structure. The less mature the plant, the greater the proportion of total dry weight of the plant that is made up of cell-soluble material. This is good grazing. In immature plants, a much higher amount of cellulose may be digested, while in mature grasses less than 25 per cent may be digested,” he says.

“Overgrazing, is the most harmful practice to any pasture. You always need to leave sufficient grass to be a solar panel. Overgrazing will also shorten the life of your pastures and increase your costs.

“I use rotational grazing as it is both beneficial to the cattle and the pasture land. Electric fencing is one tool that I use to make grazing easier. I always provide fresh water and I supply this through plastic pipelines and strategic placement of watering points. I also stockpile forage for fall-winter grazing and this is very important to my year-round grazing program for my beef cows. I find that when cows graze late in the fall and early winter, when the legumes have seed heads, they will spread these seeds around the field.

“By having a good mix of grasses and legumes in the pasture stand I can improve the soil fertility as well as the production of the livestock. By having multi species in a pasture stand I can have good productive grazing from spring to fall.

“I have also found that good plant diversity suppresses the spread of weeds, harmful insects, diseases. It also broadens the nutritional opportunities of grazing livestock.”

By inter-layering legumes throughout the grass canopy Graeme creates a more efficient pasture than is possible with just grass or legumes alone. This also lessens the threat of bloat, as the cattle can graze a mouthful of grass followed by a mouthful of alfalfa or other legumes.

He also uses annual forages to control weeds with heavy seeding rates of forage rape and annual ryegrass. These crops grow so thick they cover the soil and smother encroaching weeds. There is basically no space for the weeds to grow.

Overgrazing is the most common way weeds take over a pasture. In travelling across central Alberta and Saskatchewan last fall, I was hard pressed to find any pasture that had not been severely overgrazed, some almost to the ground. Only Kentucky bluegrass and creeping red fescue remained, two grasses not noted for high forage production. As a result, Canada thistle and other weeds dominated the landscape.

Canada thistle is considered by livestock producers to be the most problematic pasture weed on the Canadian prairie. Its roots spread one to two metres a year and can extend six metres. Root pieces as small as half a centimetre long can produce viable plants. Canada thistle is a very aggressive weed and takes light, moisture and nutrients from surrounding forages.

Dr. Ed Bork at the University of Alberta and his graduate students studied how Canada thistle responds to clipping of the surrounding plants. “We found that continuous clipping down to a height of approximately one inch every 14 days simulated maximum stress on forages… and resulted in the lowest grass production on fertilized and unfertilized pastures sites.

“High-intensity/low-frequency sites clipped to approximately one inch every six weeks provided the second-highest grass production, showing once again that a rest period is critical to forage regrowth. Deferred grazing sites were clipped once at the end of the growing season (mid-August) following unimpeded growth throughout the summer.

“The highest forage biomass came from fertilized and unfertilized plots in the deferred grazing sites. Thistle growth was highest in the continuous grazing system, followed by low-intensity/high-frequency, high-intensity/low-frequency and deferred grazing systems, in that order.”

In another study, Bork and his team evaluated high-intensity/low-frequency, low intensity/high-frequency and continuous grazed pastures.

Thistle coverage was in excess of 32 stems per square metre on continuously grazed pastures. Thistle counts dropped somewhat to 24 stems per square metre by the end of the third year on low-intensity/high-frequency grazed pastures and managed to achieve 40 per cent forage utilization with two weeks rest between grazing periods.

Cattle in the high-intensity/low-frequency pasture were allowed to graze 70 to 80 per cent of the available forage over five days, and then the pasture was rested for six weeks. This combination was hardest on the thistles at fewer than two thistle plants per square metre after three years.

High-intensity/low-frequency was the most effective system because the recovery period was sufficient for the grasses to remain competitive so the cattle ate the thistles rather than selectively graze around them. That in turn kept most of the thistles in the early growth stage or rosette stage, when they are at their most palatable and nutritious, averaging 18.6 per cent crude protein and 83 per cent total digestible nutrients.

The cattle consumed some thistles in the low-intensity/high-frequency pasture, but not enough to provide effective control.

“Cattle didn’t touch the thistles in the continuous grazing system, letting them advance to the late-flower state,” says Bork. The weeds had more stems, were pricklier and harder for animals to eat and digest than young thistles.

“A year after producers had reverted back to continuous grazing, the thistles had not recovered on the high-intensity/low-frequency pastures, and a big increase in total forage productivity was still evident. The greatest thistle control coincided with the grazing system that gave the best forage production and best utilization of thistle.”

Eat them down

It is important to put these cattle immediately in a thistle-infested pasture so they don’t lose their taste for them. Calves grazing alongside their mothers will also learn to eat thistles and this behaviour will be remembered throughout their grazing life.

Graeme has used goats to graze buck brush on his pastures. The key, he says, is to keep the goats or cows in a concentrated area with electric fencing to get them to graze a specific weed right down to the ground. Later in the day they must be let out for water.

Clark Brenzil, provincial weed specialist with Saskatchewan Agriculture sums it up very well. Prevention is the key and cheapest way to control weeds on pasture and rangelands. Once the weeds are introduced, you need to find them and eradicate them right away. You want no survivors. Some weeds have the potential to spread a million seeds per plant across your pasture and rangelands.

Detailed information on pasture rejuvenation and weed control on pastures can be found at foragebeef.ca. Look for the invasive species and pasture rejuvenation section.

Duane McCartney is a retired forage beef systems research scientist in Lacombe, Alta.

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A Handbook for Ranch ManagersA Handbook for Ranch Managers.  In keeping with the “holistic” idea that the land, the livestock, the people and the money should be viewed as a single integrated whole: Part I deals with the management of the natural resources. Part II covers livestock production and Part III deals with the people and the money. Not only would this book make an excellent basic text for a university program in Ranch Management, no professional ranch manager’s reference bookshelf should be without it. It is a comprehensive reference manual for managing the working ranch. The information in the appendices and extensive bibliography alone is worth the price of the book.

You might be interested in this books supplement: Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual.

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North Dakota – More Equal Than Other States?

North Dakota has the liberty to manage its own lands. As a result, it has become the nation’s top economic powerhouse – growing economically at five times the national average.

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersHell, look at Texas with very little “pubic” (not a typo) land and the 11th largest economy in THE WORLD! Compare that with her neighbor, New Mexico. About 60% pubic land and the poorest state in the uSSA in terms of per capita income.

There is no mystery about it folks. — jtl, 419American Lands Council

American Lands Council by Ken Ivory

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualIn the five minutes it will take you to read this article, the national debt of the United States will increase by about $9.5 million. There are no easy answers to this monumental problem, but there are simple ones.

A national debt of $18 trillion and climbing, represents an Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian Viewunprecedented embezzlement of the liberty and opportunity of future generations. We are quite literally glutting ourselves at the expense of our children and grandchildren. What’s worse, our federal government is denying our children (and our nation) simple answers to these problems, founded in basic principles of liberty and opportunity.

Combat Shooter's HandbookReconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps InstituteThe Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsWhat does this have to do with North Dakota? North Dakota has the liberty to manage its own lands. As a result, it has become the nation’s top economic powerhouse – growing economically at five times the national average. The recent energy boom has given North Dakota a 2.8% unemployment rate, a state budget surplus of over $1 billion and a steady demand for new workers. This economic opportunity has been a boon to not only North Dakota, but also carried the entire nation through the recession. If North Dakota were not treated more equally than the states to its west, there would be a national economic renaissance by unlocking greater health and productivity for the federally controlled public lands throughout the west.

The western states have the same terms of statehood as North Dakota for the transfer of federal title to their public lands. However, the federal government has failed to honor these same statehood terms. Instead, it has kept control over almost 50% of all lands west of North Dakota. Federal control of these lands fundamentally limits the liberty of the western states to properly care for their lands, and it stifles economic opportunity.

There are more than $150 trillion dollars in mineral value locked up in federally controlled western lands, including more recoverable oil than the rest of the world combined. Our national security, renewable energy and electronics technologies cannot function without a stable supply of rare earth minerals. Currently, 86% of the rare earth minerals for these critical technologies come from China, yet there is an abundant supply of rare earth minerals locked up in the federally controlled western lands.

Under increasing federal control, catastrophic wildfires millions of forested acres are going up in smoke every year. The cost to U.S. taxpayers? More than $1.5 billion a year in suppression costs alone. In 2013, over 93% of the acres burned in catastrophic wildfires were in western states. Of the over 4 million acres burned in those 11 western states, 73.8 % of the land burned was managed by federal agencies.

One-size-fails-all federal forest policies and endless litigation by so-called environmental groups tie the hands of local forest managers, preventing them from implementing what state foresters know: $1 spent in timber harvesting and reducing the risk of catastrophic wildfire saves nearly $500 in suppression costs and related damage. The valuable timber that is destroyed each year by raging fire is not only an economic loss, but also an ecological nightmare in polluted air, scorched watersheds, and destroyed fisheries, wildlife, and habitat.

What does all this have to do with North Dakota? Upon entering the Union, new states agreed to Enabling Acts, which are essentially contracts for statehood. In the Enabling Acts, the federal government promised to dispose of ownership to public lands in the states. Despite similar promises in the Enabling Acts for states east and west of North Dakota, the federal government has failed to honor this promise to the western states.

The result? Over half of the real estate west of North Dakota is controlled by the federal government—including more than 60% of both Idaho and Alaska, close to 70% of Utah, and over 80% of the state of Nevada. In states east of this Federal Fault Line, less than 5% of the land is under federal control.

To put this inequality into perspective, let’s compare North Dakota, a state that lies east of the Federal Fault Line; and Utah, a western state deprived of the same liberty opportunity, and control over its lands.

The terms of the statehood Enabling Acts for North Dakota and Utah are nearly identical. Looking at key passages side-by-side illustrates the federal government’s illogical double standard.

(Click to see Side by side comparison)

While the terms of these legally binding “solemn compacts” of statehood are essentially identical—the federal government’s treatment toward these two states is not. North Dakota gave clear title for its public lands to the federal government and in due time the federal government disposed of title to these lands. Utah also gave clear title to its public land with the understanding that the federal government would honor the same promise to transfer title to these lands like it did with all states east of Colorado. Utah, like the other western states, is still waiting to be treated equally by its federal partner.

Utah has passed legislation, urging the federal government to honor the same statehood terms it has kept with states in the east. Recently, other states (including Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, and Wyoming) have begun work on legislation to facilitate the transfer of federally controlled lands to the states.

The Utah and North Dakota Enabling Acts both contemplate that the federal government would transfer title to the public lands within their borders. The key question remains: If the federal government honored North Dakota’s Act, why not treat Utah, and the other western states, on terms of equality and unleash better care and better productivity for the benefit of the whole nation?

Surely, in America, we don’t believe that some states are more equal than others.

Be a part of the only solution big enough. Help support the fight for equality in the western states by signing the petition, encouraging your state to take action, and spreading the word.

Ken Ivory is a Utah State Representative (District 47) and president of the American Lands Council. The Council is leading the charge for the only solution big enough – the transfer of federal lands to willing western states for better access, better health, and better productivity.

FOLLOW LAND & LIVESTOCK INTERNATIONAL ON FACEBOOK

Check out our WebSite

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A Handbook for Ranch ManagersA Handbook for Ranch Managers.  In keeping with the “holistic” idea that the land, the livestock, the people and the money should be viewed as a single integrated whole: Part I deals with the management of the natural resources. Part II covers livestock production and Part III deals with the people and the money. Not only would this book make an excellent basic text for a university program in Ranch Management, no professional ranch manager’s reference bookshelf should be without it. It is a comprehensive reference manual for managing the working ranch. The information in the appendices and extensive bibliography alone is worth the price of the book.

You might be interested in this books supplement: Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual.

Posted in Public Domain, Public Lands, Public Lands Ranching | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

Give It a Shot, Part 1

A Handbook for Ranch Managers Anybody ever tried this? I haven’t but it looks like fun. — jtl

From The American Quarter Horse Journal

Mounted shooting has divisions for men, women and seniors, as well as a division for youth. Chad Little’s brother Charlie rides American Quarter Horses in the men’s division. Journal photo

If you’re interested in trying a new horseback-riding sport, cowboy mounted shooting might be for you.

From The American Quarter Horse Journal

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualIf you’re looking for a sport straight out of the old Western movies, this is it. Cowboy mounted shooting is fast moving and exciting, requiring equine speed and rate, horsemanship, and a skilled and steady hand. The sport was formed in 1991 and is an AQHA-approved event through AQHA’s alliance with the Cowboy Mounted Shooting Association.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewChad Little is one of the sport’s leading competitors. The 2010 CMSA world champion and 2011 national champion, Chad has set a number of CMSA world records, in addition to winning duplicate AQHA cowboy mounted shooting open world championship titles in 2012 and 2013. His brother, Charlie, is also a top-level competitor. He is also an overall CMSA world champion and has earned several The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) national titles. Together, they train and sell horses at Little Performance Horses in St. Michael, Minnesota, in addition to offering clinics and lessons.

If hard riding and fast shooting appeals to you, here’s some information to help you get started.

Know Your Subject

Combat Shooter's HandbookReconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps InstituteThe Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsCowboy mounted shooting is a timed event. It uses a set of 10 balloons attached to stands, set in one of more than 50 approved patterns. The patterns can include such maneuvers as turning around a barrel, switching direction and going through a “gate” or relatively narrow opening. The balloon patterns often include a “rundown” – a line of five balloons set on a straightaway.

A rider uses two .45-caliber single-action revolvers, each carrying five rounds of black-powder blanks that have an effective range of 10-15 feet. The rider must cock the gun before each shot. After five shots, the rider must holster his first gun and unholster his second while on the run. There are timed penalties for missing a balloon.

If you love the adrenaline rush of cowboy mounted shooting, then you’re going to love American Quarter Horse racing. Learn how to wager with help from AQHA’s FREE Guide to Wagering on American Quarter Horse Racing.

There is also a special rifle class, which requires one gun and one` .44-40 rifle. The rider shoots five balloons with the pistol then switches to the rifle for the final five balloons.

Safety is a big deal in the sport. At events, guns are kept unloaded until each competitor enters the competition ring.

Mounted shooting has divisions for men, women and seniors, as well as a division for youth. There are subcategories within those divisions by skill level, from 1 to 6. Riders start in Class 1 and advance after winning a division four times.

The Little brothers, who have been competing for a little more than a decade, are both Level 6 riders.

Shopping List

The necessary items for mounted shooting are fairly simple.

• Clothing: Start simple, with a western hat, button-down shirt, jeans, chaps or chinks, and western boots.

• Gun and holster: Mounted shooters shoot .45-caliber single-action revolvers and .44-40 rifles. Each shooter will need two pistols, which can cost from $600 to $1,000 per gun.

“There are all kinds of different brands,” Chad says. “A lot of ladies want a little bit of a smaller barrel, a smaller handle. It’s really just preference, whichever feels good to you.”

He recommends handling a number of different guns to find one that works. Different brands and different models have different feels, so hold the gun in your hand, pull the hammer back and pull the trigger.

“You want something comfortable in your hand that’s easy to pull the hammer back,” he says. “If you have to readjust your hand to pull the hammer back, (that’s not good).”

Once you invest in your guns, though, they are a lasting investment.

“Usually, whatever fits is going to fit you for a while,” Chad says. “A lot of the Level 6’s today are shooting the same little gun a Level 1 (competitor) would start with.”

Your holster, like your gun, is a matter of personal preference. Find one that places your guns comfortably and with ease of accessibility.

Feel the electricity of the crowd as the horses thunder down the stretch in a high-speed showcase of the beauty and athleticism of the American Quarter Horse. Learn more about racing from AQHA’s FREE Guide to Wagering on American Quarter Horse Racing.

• Horse: While your guns will likely last your shooting career, your mount is likely to change. As with any sport, it is best if a new shooter chooses an experienced equine partner.

“You need something that’ll slow down and treat you good in the meantime,” Chad advises. “Then in a few years, go up from there.”

Chad trains and sells shooting horses. When he is searching for a prospect, he generally looks for a gentle, broke horse with a good handle, then teaches the horse the skills of mounted shooting.

• Saddle: A mounted shooting horse needs to be dressed in western tack that would be considered representative of traditional equipment.

“I don’t want something that traps me in there; it has to let you move around a little,” Chad says. “Something comfortable that you could ride all day, yet if you ask your horse to go, it wouldn’t throw you out. Something with a good pocket, a good seat.”

• Bridle: Your horse should wear a western bridle. For a shoot, Chad uses a chain curb to give him more control in a high-energy atmosphere. He encourages seeking the mildest bit that allows control.

“It depends on your horse,” he says. “You think you do know if you’re yanking on them out there, but you usually aren’t aware, so the less bridle you can get away with, the better. I don’t encourage people to run out there in snaffles. You’re going to get run off with.”

Training at home, however, is a different story.

“Whatever I ride the horse in to shoot, I take the horse what I consider one step lower to ride at home,” he says. Chad typically schools his horses in a snaffle, unless the horse requires something stronger.

• Other: Chad typically uses leg wraps on all four legs and bell boots to protect the horses’ legs. It is also optional to use ear plugs for both horse and rider.

• Practice equipment: In addition to balloons, you’ll need a set of balloon holders, which is a road cone with a PVC pipe that is capped with a peg that has a valve stem.

In Part 2 of this series, you’ll learn where to begin if you’re interested in competing in the action-packed sport of cowboy mounted shooting. Stay tuned!

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Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualPlanned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual. This is the ideal squeal to A Handbook for Ranch Managers.  Although the ecological principles remain the same, what was originally known as “The Savory Grazing Method” now answers to a multitude of different names: ranching for profit, holistic management, managed grazing, mob grazing, management intensive grazing, etc. Land & Livestock International, Inc. uses “Restoration Grazing” under its “Managing the Ranch as a Business” program.” No mater what you call it, this summary and synopsis will guide you step by step through the process and teach you how to use it as it was originally intended. No more excuses for failing to complete your grazing plans.

Posted in Horses | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

As drought pervades, can markets make us water-wiser?

 Such rights could be traded without regard to the rural communities that rely on them, says Patricia Mulroy, the former water czar for Las Vegas and currently a fellow at Brookings. What’s more, markets change the conversation, from one about conservation and responsibility, to one about money, she says. “Once the market forces take hold, the only thing people will talk about is the money,” she says. “And only the economists and the accountants will move their lips.”

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewIt has been correctly said that, if the American Economy was the 7th Wonder of the World, then American economic ignorance must be the 8th. And right here Patricia Mulroy proves it.

Other than a few blatantly ignorant comments like her’s, this is actually a pretty good article. –jtl

Proponents say market tools can better move water where it’s needed.

Brian Calvert via High Country News

Water market proponents say financial tools can help move water out of complicated laws and policies.

A Handbook for Ranch Managers Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualCalifornia has been taking strong measures to deal with extreme drought, and on Thursday, California Gov. Jerry Brown took his new water policies a step further. After ordering cities to cut their water use between 10 and 15 percent last week, he approved new regulations to limit the flow of water in toilets, urinals and faucets. But some economists think that there are more efficient and effective ways to mitigate drought, so they ’re starting to dust off the idea of water markets.Putting financial tools to work in the world of water management, they believe, could free up more water for use, overcoming some of the major problems associated with dry spells, and avoiding the need for crisis measures like those in California. Proponents say markets can tell us where water is scarce and where it isn’t, and could help address one of the more nefarious aspects of water-wasting: how cheap it seems to have important it is. The water market idea isn’t new, but its proponents say the current drought, which affects many Western states to varying degrees, makes their argument more urgent.

Combat Shooter's HandbookReconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps InstituteThe Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits“Drought is a train moving at us at three miles per hour,” Jennifer Pitt, director of the Colorado River Program for the Environmental Defense Fund, says, “and if we don’t get off the track, it’s our own damn fault.”

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) Rather than complicated laws, policies and agreements, a market system could allow users to sell or buy rights from year to year, or to conserve water use without losing water rights. Such instruments, for example, would help a broccoli farmer lease his water rights to an almond farmer, earning money on a fallow field for a year while preventing a catastrophe in his neighbor’s orchard. Water law today often prohibits farmers from doing that.

While California’s drought has dominated headlines in recent months, the Colorado River Basin and many other watersheds are facing a longer-term problem: As the climate changes, dry areas of the planet are likely to get drier, so droughts will probably last even longer.

“Markets are going to be critical to the solution to drought,” Pitt says. That doesn’t mean privatizing water fully, but recognizing water’s relationship to the land it runs through—and therefore to property—to provide nuanced solutions to water use.

Currently, most water is bound to property rights, under a series of doctrines that make it hard to move around and hard to conserve. A use-it-or-lose-it aspect underpins many water policies and legalities that discourage water trading between users. They may be mere slips of paper, but water rights can be as cumbersome to move as boulders.

That lack of flexibility in Western water policy and law creates “quite a bit of tension and risk,” says Peter Culp, a water lawyer at Squire Patton Boggs, in Phoenix.

In a recent discussion paper for the Brookings Institution’s Hamilton Project, “Shopping for Water: How the Market Can Mitigate Water Shortages in the American West,” Culp and coauthors Robert Glennon, at the University of Arizona, and Gary Libecap, at the University of California, Santa Barbara, give five proposals for putting water markets in place: “reform legal rules that discourage water trading to enable short-term water transfers; create basic market institutions to facilitate trading of water; use risk mitigation strategies to enhance system reliability; protect groundwater resources; continue to expand federal leadership.”

That means, for example, that states could encourage water users to free up water on a short-term basis. (The broccoli farmer who gives his water for a year for the sake of his neighbor’s almonds is an example of this.) They also suggest finding ways to link water rights to consumption, rather than diversion, and to ensure that junior water users are not harmed in times of drought. They advocate for eliminating the “beneficial use doctrine,” which demands that all water must be used for a beneficial purpose, such as agricultural irrigation or a city utility, or see its right forfeit. That idea, the authors say, hampers markets and discourages efficient use of water.

Water markets certainly have detractors and caveats. There’s a lot of reluctance to move out of the old system, which has been in place for years and is surrounded by very complicated, hard-to-untangle laws and traditions, especially in the West. Improperly used, water markets have the potential to damage rural communities—where the holders of certain water rights may live far from the land—or farms, or ranches—where the water lies.

Such rights could be traded without regard to the rural communities that rely on them, says Patricia Mulroy, the former water czar for Las Vegas and currently a fellow at Brookings. What’s more, markets change the conversation, from one about conservation and responsibility, to one about money, she says. “Once the market forces take hold, the only thing people will talk about is the money,” she says. “And only the economists and the accountants will move their lips.”

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View

edited by

Dr Jimmy T (Gunny) LaBaume

Is now available in both PAPERBACK and Kindle

BookCoverImageMurray N. Rothbard was the father of what some call Radical Libertarianism or Anarcho-Capitalism which Hans-Hermann Hoppe described as “Rothbard’s unique contribution to the rediscovery of property and property rights as the common foundation of both economics and political philosophy, and the systematic reconstruction and conceptual integration of modern, marginalist economics and natural-law political philosophy into a unified moral science: libertarianism.”

This book applies the principles of this “unified moral science” to environmental and natural resource management issues.

The book started out life as an assigned reading list for a university level course entitled Environmental and Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View.

As I began to prepare to teach the course, I quickly saw that there was a plethora of textbooks suitable for universal level courses dealing with environmental and natural resource economics. The only problem was that they were all based in mainstream neo-classical (or Keynesian) theory. I could find no single collection of material comprising a comprehensive treatment of environmental and natural resource economics based on Austrian Economic Theory.

However, I was able to find a large number of essays, monographs, papers delivered at professional meetings and published from a multitude of sources. This book is the result. It is composed of a collection of research reports and essays by reputable scientists, economists, and legal experts as well as private property and free market activists.

The book is organized into seven parts: I. Environmentalism: The New State Religion; II. The New State Religion Debunked; III. Introduction to Environmental and Natural Resource Economics; IV. Interventionism: Law and Regulation; V. Pollution and Recycling; VI. Property Rights: Planning, Zoning and Eminent Domain; and VII. Free Market Conservation. It also includes an elaborate Bibliography, References and Recommended Reading section including an extensive Annotated Bibliography of related and works on the subject.

The intellectual level of the individual works ranges from quite scholarly to informed editorial opinion.

FOLLOW LAND & LIVESTOCK INTERNATIONAL ON FACEBOOK

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Check out our Online Rancher Supply Store

Posted in Uncategorized, Water, Water Issues | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Drought and the Failure of Big Government in California

 In California, those who control the political system have ensured that water will not go to those who value it most highly. Instead, water will be allocated in purely arbitrary fashion based on who has the most lobbyists and the most political power.

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersPlanned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualEnvironmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewAs Merle Haggard would put it, “That’s the way love goes, babe.” Natural Resource and Environmental “problems” would disappear right along with the disappearance of government. ALL (no exceptions) government interventions ALWAYS have bad but unintended consequences. 

Sounds to me like what is (and was a long time ago) needed is about 3,000 pounds of cattle per acre on that desert. — jtl, 419

by Ryan McMaken via Mises Daily

canal through the desertCalifornia Governor Jerry Brown has announced that private citizens and small businesses — among others — will have their water usage restricted, monitored, and subject to heavy fines if state agents determine that too much water has been used. Noticeably absent from the list of those subject to restrictions are the largest users of water, the farmers.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) Agriculture accounts for 80 percent of the state’s water consumption, but 2 percent of the state’s economy. To spell it out a little more clearly: Under Jerry’s Brown water plan, it’s fine to use a gallon of subsidized water to grow a single almond in a desert, but if you take a shower that’s too long, prepare to be fined up to $500 per day.

There Is No Market Price for Water

Combat Shooter's HandbookReconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps InstituteThe Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsThe fact that the growers, who remain a powerful interest group in California, happen to be exempt from water restrictions reminds us that water is not allocated according to any functional market system, but is allocated through political means by politicians and government agents.

When pressed as to why the farmers got a free pass, Jerry Brown was quick to fall back on the old standbys: California farms are important to the economy, and California farms produce a lot of food. Thus, the rules don’t apply to them. If translated from politico-speak, however, what Brown really said was this: “I have unilaterally decided that agriculture is more important than other industries and consumers in California, including industries and households that may use water much more efficiently, and which may be willing to pay much more for water.”

In California, those who control the political system have ensured that water will not go to those who value it most highly. Instead, water will be allocated in purely arbitrary fashion based on who has the most lobbyists and the most political power.

Numerous economists at mises.org and elsewhere (see here and here and here) have already pointed out that the true solution to water shortages lies in allowing a market price to determine allocation — and in allowing there to be a market in water — just as there is a market in energy, food, and other goods essential to life and health. Supporters of government-controlled water claim that billionaires will hoard all the water if this is allowed, although it remains unclear why the billionaires haven’t also hoarded all the oil, coal, natural gas, clothing, food, and shoes for themselves, since all of these daily essentials are traded using market prices, and all are used daily by people of ordinary means.

City Water vs. Agricultural Water

For a clue as to how divorced from reality is current water policy in California, we need only look at the government-determined “price” of water there. Even under current conditions, water remains very inexpensive in California, but for the record, city dwellers have historically paid much, much higher prices for water than growers.

For example, according to this study, water for residents of San Francisco rose by 50 percent from 2010 to 2014, but residents were still paying about 0.8 cents per gallon for water. In Los Angeles, the price growth was a little less over the same period, but the Los Angeles price was also low, coming in a little over 0.6 cents per gallon. City dwellers are told that water is incredibly scarce, but as Kathryn Shelton and Richard McKenzie have noted, the price of water is so low that virtually no one even knows the per-gallon price.

But how much do growers pay for their water? In a recent LA Times article contending that growers “aren’t the water enemy,” it was noted that growers are now paying $1,000 per acre foot. This is supposed to convince us that water prices are incredibly high. But how does this compare to city prices? An acre-foot is about 326,000 gallons of water, so if we do the arithmetic, we find that growers who pay $1,000 for an acre-foot are paying about 0.3 cents per gallon for their water. That’s a little less than half as much as the city users are paying.

Now, city water is treated potable water, so we might expect a premium for city water. Historically, however, the gap between city prices and agricultural prices is much, much greater. Bloomberg notes that as of 2014, the price of water had risen to $1,100 “from about $140 a year ago” in the Fresno area. Going back further, we find that in 2001 many farmers were paying $70 per acre foot. Prices well below $1,000 are far more typical of the past several decades than the $1,000 to $3,000 per acre-foot many growers now say they pay. In fact, if we see what the per-gallon price would be for a $140 acre-foot of water, we find that a city dweller could use fifty gallons per day at a monthly price of 64 cents per month, or a per-gallon price of 0.04 cents.

At prices like these, it is no wonder that there is now a shortage of water. The price of water has for years been sending the message that water is barely a scarce resource at all.

In many cases, the low prices are enabled by decades of taxpayer subsidization of water infrastructure. A year round flow of water to both cities and growers is ensured in part by huge New Deal-era projects like Shasta Dam, and Hoover Dam, which the State of California could not afford to build, but which today California largely relies upon for water, care of the US taxpayer.

In central and northern California, the primary beneficiaries of federal water projects are growers, although it’s the city dwellers, who use a relatively small amount of water, who get lectured about conserving water. Were an actual market in water allowed, however, growers would have to compete for water with city dwellers, whose industries are far more productive than agricultural enterprises and who are likely to be willing to pay higher prices. Even when the private sector owners of water are old farming families (a legacy of prior appropriation), the water would still tend to go to those who value it the most as reflected in the per-unit prices they are willing to pay. That is: city dwellers

What Will We Do Without California Growers?

The fact remains that much California farmland is in a desert where it rains under twelve inches per year. Massive irrigation projects have made farming economical in the region, but it’s unlikely that the status quo can continue forever if California dries up and cities begin to compete for more water.

When crops like pecans, which are native to Louisiana where it rains over fifty inches per year, are being grown in central California, we will have to ask ourselves if there is true comparative advantage at work here, or if the industry is really sitting upon a shaky foundation of government-subsidized and -allocated resources.

The rhetoric that’s coming out of the growers, of course, is that California growers are essential to the American food supply. Some will even suggest that it’s a national security issue. Without California growers, we’re told, we’ll all starve in case of foreign embargo.

But let’s not kid ourselves. North America is in approximately zero danger of having too little farmland for staple crops. In fact, one can argue that some of the best farmland in the world — in Iowa for instance — is underutilized because policies like Jerry Brown’s farm favoritism send the message that California will prop up its desert agriculture no matter what.

No, if California farmland continues to go dry, this only means that Americans will have to turn to other parts of the US or imports. After all, many of the crops grown in dry parts of California are much more economically grown in more humid environments, including citrus plants, avocadoes (which are native to Mexico), and various tree nuts. And of course, it’s these crops, which are already fairly expensive and water-intensive that get mentioned when we’re told that California growers must be given what they want until the end of time. This will likely mean higher prices for some of these crops in the short run, the correct response is not government favoritism, but free trade, and letting comparative advantage work. In a world with market prices, it’s simply not economical to grow everything under the sun in the California desert. If markets were allowed to function, with real water prices and free trade, this would quickly become abundantly clear.

Image source: iStockphoto

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A Handbook for Ranch ManagersA Handbook for Ranch Managers.  In keeping with the “holistic” idea that the land, the livestock, the people and the money should be viewed as a single integrated whole: Part I deals with the management of the natural resources. Part II covers livestock production and Part III deals with the people and the money. Not only would this book make an excellent basic text for a university program in Ranch Management, no professional ranch manager’s reference bookshelf should be without it. It is a comprehensive reference manual for managing the working ranch. The information in the appendices and extensive bibliography alone is worth the price of the book.

You might be interested in this books supplement: Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual.

Posted in Drought Management, Water, Water Issues | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

Grazing Series Part 2: Extensive vs. moderate grazing, effective cross-fencing & more

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualI’ll leave the nit picking up to you guys and only say that this is pretty much on target–especially considering that Amanda obviously does not completely understand what “real” planned grazing is all about.

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersNotice I said “pretty much.” That’s because it falls apart completely when she gets down to the Lalman (OSU Extension beef cattle specialist–which identifies the problem) extensive vs. intensive grazing “study.”

That thing is so full of fallacies it would take another complete article to identify them all. — jtl, 419

by in BEEF Daily

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewIs it time to alter your grazing system? Here are three management systems to consider to get the most out of your pastures this summer.

Last week, I kicked off my weekly grazing series for the month of April. Each Thursday, we’ll explore production tips for ranchers to The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) get more out of their pastures and hay fields. This week, we’re looking at extensive vs. moderate grazing methods, including rotational grazing and mob grazing, as well as the effectiveness of cross-fencing, and a whole lot more.

The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsIn case you missed it, here’s the first segment of the series: Grazing Series Part 1: 3 tips for spring hay & pasture management

Here are three grazing management systems to consider:

  Combat Shooter's HandbookReconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute1. Use cross fences to increase pasture carrying capacity.

Bruce Anderson, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension forage specialist, says electric fences are the easiest and cheapest way to increase production from summer pastures.

READ: How to use temporary fencing for controlled grazing

Anderson writes, “Dividing pastures with electric cross fences gives you more control of when and where your cattle graze. It helps you encourage cattle to graze pastures more uniformly and completely, including areas they normally avoid. And, it can help you improve the health and vigor of your grass by giving it time to recover and regrow after each grazing. As a result, your grass production and pasture carrying capacity will increase. This will be especially valuable this year considering the currently high cost of pasture. So, as spring growth of your pastures begins to slow down, use your winter electric fence to try some extra summer cross fencing of your pastures. More grass, better gains, and better profits might be the result.”

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2. Ultra-high stock density grazing can increase forage utilization.

Anderson says the popular method of mob grazing is often implemented incorrectly as ranchers are more likely just strip grazing or rotating very rapidly.

See mob grazing in action here!

He says, “What is meant by ‘ultra-high’ mob grazing is debatable but many folks consider about 3,000 pounds of animals per acre as the minimum to qualify for this category. That means you need the equivalent of around 200+ cow-calf pairs per acre. Two hundred pairs will eat 4-5 tons of forage each day so they can stay on that small piece of ground for only a brief time. In fact, this mob of animals often is moved to fresh pasture several times each day.”

Photo Credit: University of Nebraska-Lincoln 2013 mob grazing tour

READ: Is it time to alter your grazing management?

Anderson explains that mob grazing improves nutrient cycling and improves forage utilization because animals don’t have time to graze selectively in a short period of time. Plus, if done correctly, mob grazing reduces trampling, spreads manure uniformly, and helps control weeds.

3. Extensive vs. intensive grazing

Dave Lalman, Oklahoma State University Extension beef cattle specialist, studied extensive vs. intensive grazing to evaluate the best approach for producers in times of drought and high cost of land. In his study, Lalman considered extensive grazing which implements moderate grazing over a larger number of acres and an intensive system that utilizes cropland to reduce the amount of pasture needed.

READ: Combine stockpiling and faster rotation

Lalman found that the extensive grazing used more land but fewer inputs. His study used a moderate-to-low stocking rate of 13 acres per cow-calf unit. If stocking heavier than that, more hay will be needed. Meanwhile, Lalman’s intensive system used cover crops on cropland which ultimately produced more pounds of beef but also cost more money per animal.

Click here to listen to Lalman’s interview with Ron Hays to learn more about the OSU study on extensive vs. intensive grazing.

Which grazing method do you prefer to utilize in your pastures? Share your tips and success stories in the comments section below.

Don’t forget to tune in next Thursday for the third segment in our grazing series where we will focus on pasture management tips in times of drought.

The opinions of Amanda Radke are not necessarily those of Beefmagazine.com or the Penton Farm Progress Group.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View

edited by

Dr Jimmy T (Gunny) LaBaume

Is now available in both PAPERBACK and Kindle

BookCoverImageMurray N. Rothbard was the father of what some call Radical Libertarianism or Anarcho-Capitalism which Hans-Hermann Hoppe described as “Rothbard’s unique contribution to the rediscovery of property and property rights as the common foundation of both economics and political philosophy, and the systematic reconstruction and conceptual integration of modern, marginalist economics and natural-law political philosophy into a unified moral science: libertarianism.”

This book applies the principles of this “unified moral science” to environmental and natural resource management issues.

The book started out life as an assigned reading list for a university level course entitled Environmental and Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View.

As I began to prepare to teach the course, I quickly saw that there was a plethora of textbooks suitable for universal level courses dealing with environmental and natural resource economics. The only problem was that they were all based in mainstream neo-classical (or Keynesian) theory. I could find no single collection of material comprising a comprehensive treatment of environmental and natural resource economics based on Austrian Economic Theory.

However, I was able to find a large number of essays, monographs, papers delivered at professional meetings and published from a multitude of sources. This book is the result. It is composed of a collection of research reports and essays by reputable scientists, economists, and legal experts as well as private property and free market activists.

The book is organized into seven parts: I. Environmentalism: The New State Religion; II. The New State Religion Debunked; III. Introduction to Environmental and Natural Resource Economics; IV. Interventionism: Law and Regulation; V. Pollution and Recycling; VI. Property Rights: Planning, Zoning and Eminent Domain; and VII. Free Market Conservation. It also includes an elaborate Bibliography, References and Recommended Reading section including an extensive Annotated Bibliography of related and works on the subject.

The intellectual level of the individual works ranges from quite scholarly to informed editorial opinion.

FOLLOW LAND & LIVESTOCK INTERNATIONAL ON FACEBOOK

Check out our WebSite

Check out our Online Rancher Supply Store

Posted in Managed Grazing, Mob Grazing, Planned Grazing | Tagged , | 2 Comments

Radical Environmentalism via Satellite Imagery

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewLook at these very carefully and you will realize how the sites selected were very carefully cherry picked. Let me pick the sites and the story will be told 180% in reverse. But ho hum, we all know that the enviro-wackos rely on lies and distortions to make there case.

You’ve heard the old saying, “figures don’t lie but liars figure?” We A Handbook for Ranch Managers Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual could just as easily say, “photos don’t lie but photographers sure as hell do.”

And get a load of the obviously fear mongering title. — jtl

A Terrifying, Fascinating Timelapse of 30 Years of Human Impact on Earth

Combat Shooter's HandbookReconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps InstituteThe Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)

FOLLOW FLYOVER PRESS ON FACEBOOK

Check out our WebSite

Check out our e-Store

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualPlanned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual. This is the ideal squeal to A Handbook for Ranch Managers.  Although the ecological principles remain the same, what was originally known as “The Savory Grazing Method” now answers to a multitude of different names: ranching for profit, holistic management, managed grazing, mob grazing, management intensive grazing, etc. Land & Livestock International, Inc. uses “Restoration Grazing” under its “Managing the Ranch as a Business” program.” No mater what you call it, this summary and synopsis will guide you step by step through the process and teach you how to use it as it was originally intended. No more excuses for failing to complete your grazing plans.

Posted in Radical Environmentalism, Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

SITREP

OK guys, here is the SITREP that so many have been asking about.

After multiple delays, I finally got into the Neurosurgeon’s office as the last patient yesterday (22 Apr 15)

To facilitate understanding (and to record my memory for possible future reference) I need to get a tiny bit technical.

In general, there are three major phases of fracture healing. Two of them are further subdivided to make a total of five phases:

1. Reactive Phase
a. Fracture and Inflammatory Phase
b. Granulation tissue formation
2. Reparative Phase
a. Cartilage Callus formation
b. Lamellar bone deposition
3. Remodeling to the original bone contour

The good news is, after 19 weeks, there is some sign of healing. The bad news is that progress is only to phase 2.a. Cartilage Callus formation. The Dr. referred to it as a “fibrous substance.”

And the CT reveals that the break in the vertebra is indeed welded shut—only problem is that the fibrous substance is not bone (and not as strong).

Further good news (to me anyway) is that surgery is out of the question. There are two approaches—anterior entry and posterior entry.

The problem with the anterior entry approach is that there is so much osteo “debris” (left over junk from silly stunts pulled during my miss-spent youth) that it would be virtually impossible to properly position the screw.

The posterior approach is simply too risky—according to the Dr. the benefits do not measure up to the risk. In other words the cost: benefit ratio is less than 1 in his opinion—and that suits me fine. It is unnerving to even think of having a knife stuck in your neck.

So, where does that leave us? Another 6 weeks in this damned “horse” collar. Of course, we are looking for some bone to show up.

Hope springs eternal. But, the bad news is that, in the Dr.’s words, “It may never heal properly.” I responded, “I would have to be very careful.” He answered, “You would have to be very careful.”

So what now? I go back in 6 weeks for another CT scan. If it is totally healed, Ou Rah! I’ll fall down in floor of the Dr’s office and do a wrestler’s bridge (just joking).

If it is developing bone but not totally healed yet, probably another 6 weeks in the “horse” collar.

If it is not developing (i.e. there is no change between now and then), we will just discard the “horse” collar and let Mother Nature take her course—very carefully.

That’s it as I understand it and thank you all for your support and encouragement.

A Handbook for Ranch Managers Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual Combat Shooter's HandbookReconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps InstituteThe Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View

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A Handbook for Ranch ManagersA Handbook for Ranch Managers.  In keeping with the “holistic” idea that the land, the livestock, the people and the money should be viewed as a single integrated whole: Part I deals with the management of the natural resources. Part II covers livestock production and Part III deals with the people and the money. Not only would this book make an excellent basic text for a university program in Ranch Management, no professional ranch manager’s reference bookshelf should be without it. It is a comprehensive reference manual for managing the working ranch. The information in the appendices and extensive bibliography alone is worth the price of the book.

You might be interested in this books supplement: Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual.

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