Bloomberg: Let Corporations Manage Immigration – Not!

There is only one truly clear and fair solution to immigration:Allow the marketplace to function… It is not hard to do. Get rid of public property that partakes of the “tragedy of the commons.” Allow individuals to own property anywhere and everywhere. Thus, eventually, the entire land mass is “owned.”…Once ownership is ubiquitous, immigration will be controlled via this ownership. Private property makes everything simpler.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View And that is why the idea will never “fly” with the politicos. — jtl, 419

By Daily Bell Staff

Time to Privatize Immigration … The West, it’s obvious, faces a migration crisis. Across the aging, stagnating economies of the developed world, citizens are revolting against what many perceive as an uncontrolled influx of foreigners. The U.S. apart, most of these economies are also facing a prolonged crisis of growth. Under other circumstances, the solution would be obvious: restore vitality by taking in more creative and productive people from India, China and other parts of the developing world. But how to do so, given the fraught politics of immigration? -Bloomberg

A Handbook for Ranch Managers So it is time to privatize immigration. Great, we turn to Bloomberg to find out how and learn companies ought to pick who comes to America: “Corporations are better suited to the task.

The only trouble with this is that American corporations are the result of judicial force. Too often they Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manualare unholy agglomerations of violence, sloth and ineptitude.

No organization ought to supervise hundreds of thousands of people let alone millions or billions. Nor would it absent a trilogy of judicial decisions that keep these swollen giants in place.

Combat Shooter's Handbook Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsCorporate personhood, intellectual property rights including patents plus, finally, monopoly fiat-currency from central banks prop up these corporate titans. Add regulation into the mix as well.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2)The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) Corporate America is exactly what Thomas Jefferson feared. He was well aware that vast “tea” companies of the day were large enough to control their own armies. They were large as governments but much worse because they were hardly accountable.

As a result, Jefferson and others gave control of corporations to states where they were rarely formed.

Unfortunately, one of the ramifications of the Civil War was to collapse the Republic. Gigantism and corruption of every kind ensued and continues to this day.

More:

There’s clearly something unsustainable about the West’s current approach — the idea that countries won’t seek immigrants, but will by default take in whoever lands up on their shores or games the system to stay.

The task of screening possible future citizens can’t be left to local colleges. Nor should it be left to bureaucrats, for that would require them to differentiate between various seekers after citizenship, something that violates deeply-felt liberal principles.

Companies are better suited to the task. They’ll be quicker to identify the skills that will be useful and productive than governments ever could be. They can pick and choose possible immigrants in their home countries, which no government can do.

And the ability to succeed in a particular company’s corporate culture is a good proxy for how well immigrants will adapt to their new country. Perhaps the next thing that needs to be privatized is migration.

Give this Bloomberg article credit: It recognizes something is wrong with immigration,  which is currently controlled by the political class. But the solution is not to give corporations more power. When it comes to the free-market, corporations are as illegitimate as the political process.

In fact, the current immigration mess is almost entirely manufactured, from what we can tell. Presumably to destroy various tribal cultures prior to further globalization. But an additional globalist positive is that a new form of immigration control can be suggested.

In this case, not surprisingly, the suggestion is “privatization” via corporate management. This suggestion fits with a larger elite trend we have documented that is intended to considerably enhance corporate power around the world. That’s what TPP and the other corporate “free trade” deals are actually intended to do, reinforce corporate control.

This is all what we call “directed history.” Problems are manufactured; elite memes are floated and then eventually, somehow, “solutions” converge and are implemented.

But huge corporations are not be “better suited” to the task of managing immigration. There is only one truly clear and fair solution to immigration:

Allow the marketplace to function.

It is not a hard to do. Get rid of public property that partakes of the “tragedy of the commons.” Allow individuals to own property anywhere and everywhere. Thus, eventually, the entire land mass is “owned.”

Once ownership is ubiquitous, immigration will be controlled via this ownership. Private property makes everything simpler. Maybe that’s why so many politicians seem to abhor it.

Of course this is a ludicrously libertarian concept. But no … this the way that millions of Australia aborigines apparently managed the land for tens of thousands of years. Land was rigorously divided and owned.  Elaborate rituals enforced ownership.

Some of the same solutions developed in the “new world” as well, probably, perhaps because of aboriginal antecedents. It is increasingly suggested by some observers of AmerIndian culture, for instance, that decisions were taken (especially among the midwest plains-tribes) to forego the storage of food in favor of day-to-day food gathering. In such cases sociopolitical structures were regularly shattered and forms of freedom preserved.

Today’s sociopolitical and economic organization is a farcical tragedy in almost every way. People are so confused about their lives and times that they think it is right for a handful of “others” to control the volume and value of money (central banks). They think tribal solutions to justice and property are simplistic and naive even though they worked well for millennia.

Somehow, the notion has taken hold that something called “government” ought to control land (and the justice system) and that a group of strangers should have the right to welcome others onto property they do not own. This is supposedly correct because the land be owned by the “public” – which is the negation of ownership.

Someday, freedom-oriented solutions will again be seen as the solution to social, political and economic problems. Instead of putting vast regulatory apparatuses into place, people will themselves seek to control their lives and destinies – either individually or via modest-sized tribal entities (or perhaps via part-time representative colloquies). If they have problems, they will adjudicate them privately or hire a third-parties to do so. They will create and utilize their own money, with or without interest as they choose.

In some Pacific islands, for instance, “money” consisted of gigantic stones and people calculated their ownership of the stone and kept track. Even if the stones were transported and sank into the sea, people continued their calculations, which were more important than the physical presence of a rock.

Libertarianism (as well as forms of tribal republicanism) of a sort functioned well for millions around the world for thousands of years. Yet today it is seen as simplistic and the desired and necessary solution is that a handful of connected individuals (masquerading as strangers to one another) take charge of every decision, large and small, that used to be reserved to the individual or tribal group.

Anarchy, which is merely the absence of this prevailing, sociopathic control, is seen as something to be feared.  And to suggest freedom and ownership as a tool to break down the prevailing and increasingly genocidal orthodoxy will usually provide baffling moments of vague embarrassment.

Conclusion: There are proven solutions to almost problem ailing modern societies. What we have today is so evil on so many fronts that it is hard to believe it is anything but purposefully malevolent.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View

edited by

Dr Jimmy T (Gunny) LaBaume

Is now available in both PAPERBACK and Kindle

BookCoverImageMurray N. Rothbard was the father of what some call Radical Libertarianism or Anarcho-Capitalism which Hans-Hermann Hoppe described as “Rothbard’s unique contribution to the rediscovery of property and property rights as the common foundation of both economics and political philosophy, and the systematic reconstruction and conceptual integration of modern, marginalist economics and natural-law political philosophy into a unified moral science: libertarianism.”

This book applies the principles of this “unified moral science” to environmental and natural resource management issues.

The book started out life as an assigned reading list for a university level course entitled Environmental and Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View.

As I began to prepare to teach the course, I quickly saw that there was a plethora of textbooks suitable for universal level courses dealing with environmental and natural resource economics. The only problem was that they were all based in mainstream neo-classical (or Keynesian) theory. I could find no single collection of material comprising a comprehensive treatment of environmental and natural resource economics based on Austrian Economic Theory.

However, I was able to find a large number of essays, monographs, papers delivered at professional meetings and published from a multitude of sources. This book is the result. It is composed of a collection of research reports and essays by reputable scientists, economists, and legal experts as well as private property and free market activists.

The book is organized into seven parts: I. Environmentalism: The New State Religion; II. The New State Religion Debunked; III. Introduction to Environmental and Natural Resource Economics; IV. Interventionism: Law and Regulation; V. Pollution and Recycling; VI. Property Rights: Planning, Zoning and Eminent Domain; and VII. Free Market Conservation. It also includes an elaborate Bibliography, References and Recommended Reading section including an extensive Annotated Bibliography of related and works on the subject.

The intellectual level of the individual works ranges from quite scholarly to informed editorial opinion.

FOLLOW LAND & LIVESTOCK INTERNATIONAL ON FACEBOOK

Check out our WebSite

Check out our Online Rancher Supply Store

Posted in Immigration, Private Property Rights | Tagged , | Leave a comment

How to cull the right cow without keeping records

A Handbook for Ranch Managers I subscribe to an even simpler process.

Leave the bulls out year round. Calve during the 21 day period on either side of mid-rains (total calving time = 42 days). Anything that calves outside that period goes to town.

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual Select replacement heifers for fertility. If she doesn’t have two calves by her third birthday, she goes to town.

Anything that gets sick or takes on a load of parasites is taken to the hospital pen, nursed back to health and taken to town.–jtl

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewYou select bulls. But you cull cows.

In nearly every talk I give, I challenge the audience to cull the right cow. That requires the development of a systems mindset and some good discipline. We are often told to keep individual records on each cow and calf. I want to contradict that and tell you that it is a waste of time. The time spent on tagging calves and keeping records would be much better spent planning and developing fence and water to do a better job of grazing or working on selection, culling and marketing strategies.

Combat Shooter's Handbook   Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsYou don’t really select cows. You eliminate or cull the ones you don’t want. You select bulls.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)  If you cull the right cows, your herd will rapidly be rid of most of the problems that take your time and cost you money.  Also, it will slowly improve in the income-generating traits. Now, how do we cull the right cow without any paper or computerized records?

It starts with heifer calves. Sometime between weaning and breeding, you eliminate the “ugly” ones and poor doers—doesn’t take any paper or computer to do that. Then expose the rest (a very high percentage) to bulls or AI for a very short time. I prefer 30 days or less. Then eliminate those that don’t get pregnant—again, no paper or computer. I can already hear someone saying, “I want to select the heifers that I expose to the bulls.” Let me ask several questions:

  • Are you going to sell the mother of every heifer that you don’t keep? Why not?
  •  If you have used good bulls, shouldn’t the heifer calf have a good chance of being better than her mother?
  • Do you really think you can select the good ones more accurately than Mother Nature and the bull? I have a lot of experience that tells me you can’t.
  • What really makes a replacement valuable?

With very few exceptions, heifers that breed in the second cycle will not live long enough to catch up to those that breed in the first cycle. The research shows that yearling heifers that breed in the first cycle will average about one more calf in a lifetime and significantly more pounds of weaned calf. So, start by culling heifers that don’t breed early.

Then my cull list continues:

  • Opens—yes, every one, even if it’s your daughter’s first heifer. It’s much more profitable to cash her in and replace with one that will calve next year. Make this sort off the end of the chute at pregnancy check time—no paper or computer.
  • Dries—don’t confuse with opens. These are the real expensive ones. You feed them from the time they were checked pregnant but somewhere along the way, they lose their calf. You can sort them off at calving, branding or weaning—usually the earlier the better. Some ranchers sell rebred dries. I think this is OK if they are sold to people who don’t raise replacements.
  • Those that need individual attention—to pull calves, doctor, etc. You surely can’t afford these. They have taken valuable time. To help keep track of these cows, I do like to tag every replacement heifer when she is confirmed pregnant. Then, as problems occur, use a notching tool to notch the tags of those you have to handle so you can find and separate them at a subsequent working. Weaning and pregnancy checking is a good time to get the notched animals sorted off and placed with your market animals.
  • Raise poor calves. Some will say I need a scale and adjusted weights to do this. No, I’m only looking for the poor ones. I can see those, and I don’t sell adjusted weights. When you wean, sort the poor calves off and let them back in with the cows the next day. They will “mother up” and you can then sort them off and prepare them for marketing.
  • Bad disposition. You just don’t want them. Besides being a danger to handlers, they cost you money in many other ways—broken fences, more shrink as they stir up the whole herd, etc. They get a bad disposition three ways—inheritance, they learn it from other cattle, or they learn it from their handler. The first two are easy to fix.
  • Ugly (your definition). Sometimes your “ugly” will be someone else’s “pretty.” I liked to call those that calved after the first 30 days “ugly” and sell them to someone as terminal crossing cows who thought they were pretty nice. Remember, with the cows (not yearling heifers), I like a short calving season and long breeding season. There are other things that can make them ugly—tall and narrow, feet, legs, udders or things that will reduce buyer acceptance.

You see we didn’t need to tag calves at birth or keep any paper or computer records to get this job done. It is simple and takes little time for the good cow man who has a good mental picture of what a cowherd should look like and do. Your cows will become more uniform in phenotypic appearance and cow size will move toward what is best adapted to your management and environment while you are eliminating the ones you don’t want—if you don’t mess it up with poor bull selection.

Some who respond to my articles are trying to reduce their dependence on labor, equipment and facilities. At the same time, they are replacing fed feed with grazing. As you reduce inputs, culling rates may be a little higher for a while, but there are good cows in every herd. The good ones will survive and reproduce. Average cows are pretty good cows. That kind will keep you in business.  Those that can’t wean an acceptable calf every year are the ones to eliminate.

Following these guidelines will make more progress in the operational and economic efficiency of your herd than trying to select faster growing, prettier heifers. What does it matter if they grow faster if they are born later and have less days to grow; if they won’t breed as well; if they don’t calve as easily or; if you have to doctor them? Don’t let a desire for high growth rates and weaning weight obscure the goal of total pounds produced from the system and, yes, profitability.

Burke Teichert, a consultant on strategic planning for ranches, retired in 2010 as vice president and general manager of AgReserves, Inc. He resides in Orem, Utah. Contact him at burketei@comcast.net.

FOLLOW FLYOVER PRESS ON FACEBOOK

Check out our WebSite

Check out our e-Store

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualPlanned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual. This is the ideal squeal to A Handbook for Ranch Managers.  Although the ecological principles remain the same, what was originally known as “The Savory Grazing Method” now answers to a multitude of different names: ranching for profit, holistic management, managed grazing, mob grazing, management intensive grazing, etc. Land & Livestock International, Inc. uses “Restoration Grazing” under its “Managing the Ranch as a Business” program.” No mater what you call it, this summary and synopsis will guide you step by step through the process and teach you how to use it as it was originally intended. No more excuses for failing to complete your grazing plans.

A Handbook for Ranch Managers Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View Combat Shooter's Handbook Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) 

FOLLOW FLYOVER PRESS ON FACEBOOK

Check out our WebSite

Check out our e-Store

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualPlanned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual. This is the ideal squeal to A Handbook for Ranch Managers.  Although the ecological principles remain the same, what was originally known as “The Savory Grazing Method” now answers to a multitude of different names: ranching for profit, holistic management, managed grazing, mob grazing, management intensive grazing, etc. Land & Livestock International, Inc. uses “Restoration Grazing” under its “Managing the Ranch as a Business” program.” No mater what you call it, this summary and synopsis will guide you step by step through the process and teach you how to use it as it was originally intended. No more excuses for failing to complete your grazing plans.

Posted in Cattle Production | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Ignore the Flu Vaccine Propaganda

Source: Ignore the Flu Vaccine Propaganda

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

The Looming Smash-Up of the World’s Economy

Source: The Looming Smash-Up of the World’s Economy

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Artists Of Then, Now & Forever – Forever Country

In celebration of “The 50th Annual CMA Awards,” CMA has created the biggest music video in Country Music history. Titled “Forever Country,” the single and accompanying music video features 30 CMA Award-winning acts. This single was produced by CMA Board member and CMA Award winner Shan

Source: Artists Of Then, Now & Forever – Forever Country

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Gun rights debate returns to Washington courtroom

America’s most aggressive civil rights organization

Source: Gun rights debate returns to Washington courtroom

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Chuck Baldwin — Another Unarmed American Citizen Shot And Killed By Police

Just how many of these killings were not justified we will never know because the vast majority of unjustified shootings are swept under the carpet by the powers that be, leaving victims’ families to suffer without resolution and with intense resentment against our government and its representatives in law enforcement.

Source: Chuck Baldwin — Another Unarmed American Citizen Shot And Killed By Police

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Are ranchers spitting into the wind on wind energy issues?

The unique culture, diversity and quality of the West demands no less.

American agriculture (farmers and, to a much lesser extent, ranchers) is the world’s largest welfare recipient. As such, they are also notoriously two faced. They boast of being “rugged individualists” while waiting for the government check to arrive.

Wind energy is not economically viable and would not exist without subsidies (which is the market’s way of telling us we don’t need it).

Government subsidies are funded with money taken from the productive class at the point of a gun. So, if you accept any kind of subsidy, you are guilty of “receiving stolen funds.” — jtl, 419

by in BEEF Editors’ Blog

Just as with water, wind energy development in the West is a controversial and divisive issue. But there is a path forward and ranchers need to play a major part in addressing the issue.

Just as with water, energy development in the West has become, in some camps at least, a controversial and divisive issue as ranchers, energy developers, sportsmen, conservationists and environmentalists all look at the changing West through their own set of lenses.

Among those energy development issues that has come to the fore in the last decade or so is wind energy. Drive through the Texas Panhandle at night, my recently-departed home for many decades, and the blinking red lights of a multitude of wind turbines dot the landscape in an eerie scene that raises questions from the uninitiated.

Into this challenging and divisive landscape dives the Sandhills Task Force, a group of ranchers, conservation agencies and others who are dedicated to preserving the ranching tradition of the region as well as the wildlife and vegetative diversity of this truly unique part of Nebraska and the West. Nebraska ranks among the top states for potential wind resources and each year brings additional requests for development of wind farms throughout the state, the group says in a recently-published white paper.

The white paper is a result of a request by Gov. Pete Ricketts for input into whether or not to form a working group to address wind energy and other issues facing the ranching economy in the state. In the white paper, the Sandhills Task Force identifies inappropriate placement of energy development as one of the most urgent threats facing the region. Additional priority threats are land fragmentation and invasive species. “If these threats are not addressed soon, the Sandhills could be irreparably altered,” according to the white paper.

Indeed, those are priorities throughout the West. And just like water, ranching interests must be at the table as these issues are cussed, discussed and ultimately, hopefully, solved. Fortunately, there are several resources available to help people throughout the West develop a roadmap to accomplish the task.

One model is what has been done in the Kansas Flinthills to address wind energy development. The Wind and Prairie Task Force has developed principles, tools and guidelines that local entities can use as they address wind energy development and other environmental issues.

In addition, the University of Nebraska-Lincoln has established a Nebraska Wind Energy and Wildlife Project that can provide useful information.

These are just two examples of numerous efforts being made throughout the West. Those efforts must continue. Nebraskans should encourage Gov. Ricketts to establish a working group for his state, as should ranchers in other states encourage local and state politicians to do the same.

The unique culture, diversity and quality of the West demands no less.

A Handbook for Ranch Managers Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View  Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits Combat Shooter's Handbook 

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) 

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersA Handbook for Ranch Managers.  In keeping with the “holistic” idea that the land, the livestock, the people and the money should be viewed as a single integrated whole: Part I deals with the management of the natural resources. Part II covers livestock production and Part III deals with the people and the money. Not only would this book make an excellent basic text for a university program in Ranch Management, no professional ranch manager’s reference bookshelf should be without it. It is a comprehensive reference manual for managing the working ranch. The information in the appendices and extensive bibliography alone is worth the price of the book.

You might also be interested in the supplement to this Handbook: Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual.

Posted in Government Interventionism, wind energy | Tagged | Leave a comment

The sky’s the limit… using drones in the grazing industry

I thought some of you might be interested. — jtl

Date: Thursday 20 October 2016

Time: 12.30 pm – 1.30 pm AEST

Webinar location: At your computer in the comfort of your home/ office or on the go, using your mobile device!

*** If you have limited internet connectivity, you can still participate by listening on your phone and watching the presentation slides.We’ll send these through to you the day before the webinar. Just make sure to select this option when you register. ***

Drones or Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are everywhere! There is talk about using drones to do almost everything… from delivering parcels to inspecting assess and infrastructure .

What does this technology mean for graziers and how they manage their properties and livestock?

In this exciting webinar Josh Keegan (Director and CEO of the World Drone Challenge) will provide his insights into how drone research and technology can be used on properties to do everything from inspect water infrastructure (troughs and dams), to monitoring invasive pest species and crop health, to tracking and monitoring livestock.

Josh wears a couple of hats as both the Owner and Director of Keegan Consulting Group and also the Director and CEO of the World Drone Challenge.

He has given talks on the future of drones in cities at the Asia Pacific Cities Summit and the Audacious Ideas Festival in 2015 on ‘How to handle the coming drone invasion’.

Josh is currently working with aviation experts and CASA as part of the World Drone Challenge to create a new global competition placing Australia at the forefront of drone technology.

This session will be recorded and a link will be sent to all those who register. So if you can’t attend on the day, you won’t miss out!

Guest presenters
Join Josh Keegan, Director and CEO of the World Drone Challenge along with host John James, FutureBeef.
Who should register for this webinar?
This event is for anyone involved along the beef supply chain including producers, processors, brand managers, supply chain managers, agents, consultants and consumers.
The session will be recorded and a link will be sent to all those who register. So if you can’t attend on the day, you won’t miss out.
Register now!
To successfully participate in this webinar
1. Reserve your webinar seat now by following this link. Or copy and paste this into your web browser: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1755996313200316675.
You need to register to receive your personal login details (if you don’t receive an automated response within a minute or so, check your junk email folder).
2. Click the option to ‘Add to Outlook calendar’ to get an automated reminder to join the webinar.
3. Test your computer set-up beforehand by going to this Citrix website (http://help.citrix.com/webinar/get-ready/). If you have problems, contact your local computer support or the friendly GoToWebinar support team (1800 356 792 in Australia).
4. Join 10 minutes early on the day of the webinar. You can interact by typing questions in the Q&A panel or by raising your electronic hand.
This is a BeefConnect event, brought to you through a partnership between FutureBeef and Beef Central, with funding from the Queensland Government and Meat & Livestock Australia.

Ranches for Lease

Northern CA. Well water,three pivots. 1300 acres,200 irrigated rest dry land pasture. Fenced and cross fenced. Solar stock well. For more information, email you questions to info@landandlivestockinternational.com

Ranches for Sale in Northern Mexico and Southern Arizona

Potrero de San Luis

The Ranch consists of approximately 5,316 acres (2,151 Hectares) of private land. The approximate cattle carrying capacity is 120 head annually depending on rainfall.

The Ranch lies at the southern extremity of the Animas Mountains of southwestern New Mexico. The northern boundary of the property is the US-Mexican Border. Adjacent to the Ranch on the north is the Diamond A Ranch, a 321,000 acre property that is owned by the Animas Foundation. The Diamond A has been protected by conservation easement and is nationally recognized for its innovative research and conservation efforts in this unique area of the southwest.

The Potrero de San Luis is a breathtakingly beautiful property with sweeping views in every direction. There are very few valleys with such lush grasslands that have such a tremendous amount of biological diversity. Given the proximity to the Diamond A Ranch, there may be opportunities in the future to participate in conservation improvements on the property.

Listed Price: $700,000
Rancho Puerta Blanca

The Ranch consists of approximately 13,699 acres (5,544 Hectares) of private land. The approximate cattle carrying capacity is 200 head annually depending on rainfall.

The Ranch lies at the southern extremity of the Peloncillo Mountains of southeastern Arizona. The northern boundary of the property is the US-Mexican Border. The topography is hilly to mountainous and the Ranch is bisected by several large canyons with lush riparian vegetation. Guadalupe Canyon, which flows into the northern area of the Ranch from Arizona, has many large Sycamore trees and is the location of the Ranch headquarters.
There are two houses at the headquarters. The original house has been remodeled and includes four bedrooms and two bathrooms. The second house has two bedrooms and one bathroom. There is also a large corral and barn.

The Rancho La Puerta Blanca is a beautiful property that has a diversity of geography. There are interesting mountains and lovely valleys. Access is very convenient from Highway 2 and the headquarters improvements are located adjacent to the border. This is a very unique property that would be an ideal cattle ranch/hunting property combination.

Listed Price: $2,050,000

Hunt Valley Ranch in Apache County

The ranch is generally rectangular in shape being three miles from north to south and one mile wide including a total of 1,173 deeded acres.

Building improvements include a single family residence constructed in the 1950’s with an addition done in the 1980’s. The house is of wood frame construction on concrete foundation and floors in fair condition. There is an attached 2 car garage. The house has not been lived in for many years and the house is considered to be in disrepair.

Vegetation is generally open grassland with some scattered junipers throughout. There are a few scattered fruit trees in the yard around the house and a small 1-2 acre irrigated field directly northeast of the house which is currently planted with improved pasture for grazing. There was an old apple orchard located on the northeast edge of the ranch which has not been farmed in many years. All of the orchard trees have died. Remnants of the old trees, fencing and irrigation ditch are still present.

There is also 320 acres of grazing land which is leased from the Zuni Indian Tribe. The property is directly adjacent to the subject on the northern boundary and provides a good source of additional livestock forage.

Listed Price: $595,000

CALIFORNIA CATTLE RANCH 3000 acre ranch, with additional adjoining 1500 acre of BLM (4500 acres total )

LOCATION: 37096 Yokohi Dr, Exeter, CA Between Three Rivers and Springville, 25 min. S.E. of Visalia and 15 + – mi. S.E. of HWY 198

LAND: Working cattle ranch divided into 4 separate pastures with water at both ends of each pasture. Carrying capacity 300 pairs year round. The terrain is mostly gently rolling with elevations from 1,000 – 2,000. Owner in process of parceling off 13 – 160 acre parcels.

WATER: Two year round creeks, 9 ponds. Domestic well & pump.

HEADQUARTERS: Main home is three bedrooms, two bath, gas heat, large patio. Attached two car garage. Shop/Tack Room New pipe corrals w/loading chute & scales. Holding pens w/water
Large 100 ton barn.

WILDLIFE: Good cross section of wildlife, such as Wild Pigs, Deer, Coyotes, Bob Cats, Quall, Ducks, Dove, Rabbits and Wild Turkey

UTILITIES: Electricity and telephone service

ZONING: Agriculture

REMARKS: This is one the finest cattle and recreational ranches in the Sierra Mountains. This property would be more than ideal for movie locations. This ranch has an excellent income from approx. 300 pairs on a year round basis. Lots of lovely oak trees, waterfalls, ponds, streams, hiking trails, and scenic rolling hills make this ranch a Gem of the Sierra’s waiting just for you.

The following are points of interest concerning this exciting investment opportunity:

Currently running 350 cows and their offspring All cows and bulls are Black Angus

Cattle graze on native grass and no antibiotics or Hormones used – all organic beef

Excellent recreational get – away with no city lights or lights – just nature

Options of lease back or on-site management.

Land & Livestock International, Inc. Disclosure Statement:

Neither Land & Livestock International, Inc. nor any of its officers or directors are real estate brokers or licensed appraisers. We are trained and experienced range managers and range-livestock economists.

We do not accept any kind of “commission” or other fee based on a percentage of the transaction. We strictly represent the buyer for a negotiable hourly, daily, monthly, or annual consulting fee.

We assist the buyer in doing his/her due diligence including, but not limited to: generating a strategic plan for the ranching business, evaluating the carrying capacity of the land, acquiring cattle, grazing planning, land (infrastructure) planning, generating cash flow projections and break-even analyses, capital budgeting, negotiating the purchase, hiring, training and supervising operational level management, dealing with federal land management agencies and any other tasks necessary to the consummation of the purchase and the management of a successful business.

Contact Us

If the link won’t work for you, copy and paste the following email address onto the “To” line of your email: info@landandlivestockinternational.com

Posted in Public Service Announcement | Tagged | Leave a comment

The KKK and Mass Racial Killings

Googling “KKK” yields over 72 million results, considerably more than the joint total for “Communist” and “Communists,” and well over twice what you get for “Communism.” Such prominence seems rather excessive, given that throughout most of the 20th century, Communism controlled some one-third of the world’s population, and the resulting political conflict periodically threatened to unleash global thermonuclear war. Even today, a self-described Communist Party governs China, a nation 1.4 billion strong, which by some measures has now passed the U.S. to become the world’s largest economy. Meanwhile, the last time the KKK held any significant political power was almost 100 years ago, during its Midwestern heyday of the 1920s.

Source: The KKK and Mass Racial Killings

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment