It’s possible to pasture cattle without using fences

…it’s important to ride through cattle a lot, without making them do anything. “This puts them at ease, and they won’t automatically take off when they see someone on horseback,” he says. It’s important that the cattle are used to your presence and comfortable with it.

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualWith the correct techniques and gentle persuasion, cattle can rotationally graze large pastures, even rangeland, without using fences or other borders.

It’s possible to rotationally graze cattle on large pastures or rangeland without using electric fence and without herders, says Bob Kinford. Billing himself as “the only person teaching how to instill herd instinct in cattle,” Kinford says low-stress stockmanship is the key.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewThe Van Horn, Texas, rancher describes himself as “a low-stress stockman teaching stockmanship to those who handle cattle on horseback or want to practice holistic grazing without extra fencing.” It’s all about instilling herd instinct in the cattle and utilizing it to keep them bunched up — without fences or herders.

Combat Shooter's Handbook“This is what people used to do with livestock; we used to herd them,” Kinford says. “But we’ve gone away from this type of grazing management toward relying onfences to keep animals where we want them. The result is that fenceless stockmanship is foreign to many ranchers.”

The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsKinford says that, as a kid, he pondered why goats and sheep exhibited a herd mentality, but cows would scatter. He says it took him several decades of experimenting to discover that cattle’s natural instinct is to act as a herd, but it only happens when human-induced stress is absent.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) “If cattle are on range and semi-wild, they scatter when they see riders, and they’re hard to gather. They scatter as a defense tactic, to get away, because they know they are captive when they are all together. If you remove that stress from cattle, however, they won’t try to scatter,” he explains.

Kinford takes his cues for natural cattle movement from watching how cattle behave around each other. “You’ll see the boss cow walk by another animal; if she puts her head down, the other cow will speed up to get out of her way,” he says. He adds that when a bull herds his cows, the cows respond to his leadership. “All a bull has to do is make a threatening gesture, and the cows will get back into the herd and stay there.”

When relocating cattle, he gets the herd moving slowly across the landscape, and then moves ahead of them to slow them down. The cattle will start dropping their heads and graze, but only to take a bite or two while maintaining their movement. This, he says, is similar to how big herds graze on the African plains — staying together and grazing slowly across the land.

Using minimal pressure

He says cattle are much more amenable to doing what humans desire, if it’s not accompanied by excessive pressure. “You get a lot farther by just giving a cow a suggestion, then walking off and leaving her. When you’re moving cattle and starting them up, don’t try to do it quickly; it’s better to ease them into it,” Kinford says.

To illustrate his point, he asks his seminar attendees to imagine themselves in a traffic jam. “You sit there, bored and frustrated, and when everyone starts to move a little in front of you, the stress is relieved. But if there are people honking behind you, your stress level rises, and you generally look for a way out, while the stress just keeps building,” he explains.

It’s the same with cattle,” he says. “If cattle are scattered out, rather than picking them all up and moving them, I go around them quietly. To any that are lying down, I just get close enough that they’ll get up. I’ll then leave them alone and let them stretch, or I’ll walk by them to where they start moving a few steps, and have them going the same direction as the other cows. If I do this early in the morning when they’re starting to get up and go to water, they’ll decide to go to water now.” You’ve given them that suggestion, he says.

“Then you can just ride off and leave them. The cow we nudged, then goes down to join the other cows and gets water.”

Because cattle are “suggestible” animals, Kinford says just a bit of suggestion is necessary to get the cattle started. “If a few cows don’t go with the herd, all you have to do is give those cows a suggestion and they join the herd, too. If you do this two or three times, they keep getting closer together every time they move somewhere, staying together as a herd,” he says.

If you can make a cow think it’s her idea to do something, you can do anything with cattle. The key is to do it at the cow’s speed.

“Once you get the cattle acting as a herd, all you have to do is get to the front and slow them down to stop them where you want them. If you have pairs, ride through them a bit and encourage them to stay mothered up,” Kinford says.

He stresses that it’s important to ride through cattle a lot, without making them do anything. “This puts them at ease, and they won’t automatically take off when they see someone on horseback,” he says. It’s important that the cattle are used to your presence and comfortable with it.

“Then, when you start them, you move to the front and go against them to turn the front of the herd, whichever direction you want them to go. They’ll just line out and go,” he says.

Kinford reports that he’s handled alone up to 1,200 steers and 600 cow-calf pairs. “You just need enough patience to teach yourself to be able to trust the cattle,” he explains.

He says one common mistake is when herders attempt to keep all the cattle in a tight bunch as they move, with any stragglers immediately chased up to the herd. But Kinford says that stresses the slow cattle. “But if you don’t follow them, after a few times, they’ll come on their own,” he says.

When he moves cattle by himself, Kinford says there may be a small group toward the back of the herd that stop to graze. “They may be 100 yards away from the herd, and I’ll trot back there. One will look up and see me coming, and they’ll start running, playing and racing to see which of them can catch up with the herd the fastest. I don’t have to do anything at all to move them,” he says.

In fact, Kinford says he has a blue heeler dog that sometimes handles the chore. “She’ll trot back partway and the cows will come join the herd; then she’ll come back so proud of herself as if to say, ‘See what I did, Boss!’ It’s almost like remote control,” Kinford says.

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A Handbook for Ranch ManagersA Handbook for Ranch Managers.  In keeping with the “holistic” idea that the land, the livestock, the people and the money should be viewed as a single integrated whole: Part I deals with the management of the natural resources. Part II covers livestock production and Part III deals with the people and the money. Not only would this book make an excellent basic text for a university program in Ranch Management, no professional ranch manager’s reference bookshelf should be without it. It is a comprehensive reference manual for managing the working ranch. The information in the appendices and extensive bibliography alone is worth the price of the book.

You might be interested in this books supplement: Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual.

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U.S. could be facing megadrought

The National Science Foundation and NASA funded the research. Ault was supported by a startup grant from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewCaveat emptor. In other words, watch your wallet. – jtl, 419

by Logan Hawkes via Southwest Farm Press

Serious drought conditions experienced in recent years across the Southwest, Midwest and Far West may seem insignificant in the years ahead if a new NASA-Cornell University study is correct in its long range climate outlook.

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersThe study, released just last week, says a megadrought is possible for a large area of the United States in the not-too-distant future, a drought that could last for several decades, bringing with it life-and-planet-changing developments that could spell disaster not only to farmers but the population-at-large.

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualThe study is drawing a great deal of attention, some of it negative from those who believe climate change in general is either unfounded or greatly over-rated. But authors of the study say scientific evidence supports their conclusion and warn that how we manage water resources in coming years will be critical if their predictions of a long-lasting drought run true.

The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits    For the latest on southwest agriculture, please check out Southwest Farm Press Daily and receive the latest news right to your inbox.

Combat Shooter's HandbookThe study, published Feb. 12 in the journal Science Advances, an online publication of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, claims a major drought could form later this century and could last for as much as 30 years.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)    “The results were striking. As a society, we’ve weighted the dice toward megadrought. Data clearly point to a high risk in the Southwest and Great Plains as we continue to add carbon dioxide into our atmosphere,” said Toby Ault, Cornell associate professor of earth and atmospheric sciences in a university report last week. “However, if we manage to get serious about lowering greenhouse gases within the next 10 years, we could face a lower risk.”

The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2)NASA’s Benjamin Cook and Jason Smerdon served as co-authors of the study.

Higher temperatures

The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)According to the research team, the study, titled “Unprecedented 21st Century Drought Risk in the American Southwest and Central Plains and Drought Risk in Western North America,” warns of higher regional temperatures amplifying possible late-century droughts and predicts extreme challenges facing agriculture and government that will face extreme challenges managing water needs exaggerated by a sustained period of exceptionally dry weather.

While researchers agree that human activity is adding to the elevated risk and timing of climate change, they also agree that a normal cyclic change in climate is also at play. By examining tree rings and other physical evidence, the report indicates previous research identified a period of time called Medieval Climate Anomaly (A.D. 1100-1300) when megadroughts were common.

By analyzing data from 17 state-of-the-art global climate models, Cook, Ault and Smerdon learned that western North America’s future drought risk exceeded even the driest centuries of the Medieval Climate Anomaly.

According to the report published in the Cornell Chronicle, The role of climate change in causing extreme heat waves, drastic rainfall, negative impacts on human health and threatened food security have received more attention recently than megadroughts. However, Ault views prolonged drought risk as yet another natural hazard that becomes more likely from human activity.

Manageable hazard

“Hurricanes and tornadoes are natural hazards and they strike fast. A megadrought is a natural hazard, but it unfolds slowly – over a period of decades,” said Ault. “It’s just another natural hazard and one we can manage.”

The study indicates that while less rain will fall during the upcoming megadrought period, of greater concern will be elevated heat levels which will rob moisture from soils, further complicating food production.

There’s at least an “80 percent chance of a megadrought in the aforementioned regions” if climate change continues unabated, Ault says.

A megadrought is defined as a drought that lasts for decades or longer, such as those that scorched portions of the West in the 12th and 13th centuries.

“Natural droughts like the 1930s Dust Bowl and the current drought in the Southwest have historically lasted maybe a decade or a little less,” Ben Cook, climate scientist at NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies and lead author of the study, said in a statement.

Ault, a faculty fellow with the Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future, wants to lower carbon dioxide emissions quickly.

“The time to act is now. The time to start planning for adaptation is now,” he said. “We need to assess what the rest of this century will look like for our children and grandchildren.”

The National Science Foundation and NASA funded the research. Ault was supported by a startup grant from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View

edited by

Dr Jimmy T (Gunny) LaBaume

Is now available in both PAPERBACK and Kindle

BookCoverImageMurray N. Rothbard was the father of what some call Radical Libertarianism or Anarcho-Capitalism which Hans-Hermann Hoppe described as “Rothbard’s unique contribution to the rediscovery of property and property rights as the common foundation of both economics and political philosophy, and the systematic reconstruction and conceptual integration of modern, marginalist economics and natural-law political philosophy into a unified moral science: libertarianism.”

This book applies the principles of this “unified moral science” to environmental and natural resource management issues.

The book started out life as an assigned reading list for a university level course entitled Environmental and Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View.

As I began to prepare to teach the course, I quickly saw that there was a plethora of textbooks suitable for universal level courses dealing with environmental and natural resource economics. The only problem was that they were all based in mainstream neo-classical (or Keynesian) theory. I could find no single collection of material comprising a comprehensive treatment of environmental and natural resource economics based on Austrian Economic Theory.

However, I was able to find a large number of essays, monographs, papers delivered at professional meetings and published from a multitude of sources. This book is the result. It is composed of a collection of research reports and essays by reputable scientists, economists, and legal experts as well as private property and free market activists.

The book is organized into seven parts: I. Environmentalism: The New State Religion; II. The New State Religion Debunked; III. Introduction to Environmental and Natural Resource Economics; IV. Interventionism: Law and Regulation; V. Pollution and Recycling; VI. Property Rights: Planning, Zoning and Eminent Domain; and VII. Free Market Conservation. It also includes an elaborate Bibliography, References and Recommended Reading section including an extensive Annotated Bibliography of related and works on the subject.

The intellectual level of the individual works ranges from quite scholarly to informed editorial opinion.

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4 beef headlines: fat-fighting beef, Farmland movie, beef prices, grass-fed vs. grain-fed

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualA little something for everyone today. — jtl

By Amanda Radke in BEEF Daily

In reflecting on recent consumer news about beef, it’s hard to tell whether March came in like a lion or a lamb. Here is a roundup of four beef headlines circulating in the mainstream media lately that ranchers should know about this week.

  1. “6 ‘unhealthy’ foods that blast fat”featured on Eat This Not That

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersThe 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC) isn’t going to have the last word about beef. After releasing its recommendations for the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, the DGAC says Americans should skip red meat in their diets. However, it doesn’t look like all nutrition experts agree. According to this article, beef has a surprising superhero nutrient – conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) – that doesn’t get enough credit. Here is an excerpt:

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View“Another fat-blasting ‘bad’ food is beef. Beef contains CLA, which is a superhero nutrient that hardly anyone talks about. CLA can promote fat loss, decrease body fat and reduce cholesterol levels— oh, and it happens to be found in burgers. The nutrient (its real name is conjugated linoleic acid) goes hand-in-hand with protein, another fat-burning component in burgers. And a beefed-up slider contains another supernutrient that most of us, particularly women, don’t get enough of: iron. Being short on iron causes your body to burn fewer calories, yet as many as one in five American women are iron-deficient. To keep the metabolism humming, a woman needs 18 mg/day (men need about 8mg/day). Just one average-sized 4-ounce burger gets you 25% of the way there

  1. The documentary Farmland will be available on DVD on March 3rd.

The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits    Combat Shooter's HandbookAcademy Award-winning filmmaker James Moll’s feature-length documentary, Farmland, will be available on DVD beginning tomorrow, March 3, at Walmart and walmart.com. The film offers a firsthand glimpse inside the world of farming by showcasing the lives of six young farmers and ranchers in their 20s.

 The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) Produced by Allentown Productions, Farmland was made with the generous support of the U.S. Farmers & Ranchers Alliance. Check out the official trailer and more information about the feature-length documentary at FARMLANDfilm.com.

  1. “There’s bad news about your favorite burger”by Benjamin Snyder forFORTUNE magazine

Beef prices continue to make the news, week after week. However, despite the uptick in prices, Americans still want their favorite protein. Here is an excerpt on the latest article relating to the rising cost of beef:

“Have a hankering for a cheaper burger or a less pricey steak? Too bad. Beef prices are unlikely to dip any time soon for American carnivores. The government believes that beef output may drop to a 22-year low this year. The surge in beef has the USDA weighing in with ominous news for consumers: Retail prices for beef are expected to increase another 5% to 6% this year. That’s a bigger jump than any other food group.”

  1. “Is grass-fed beef really better for you, the animal and the planet?”by Tamar Haspel for The Washington Post

What’s great about the U.S. beef industry is there are so many ways to produce beef, and there are many different kinds of consumers out there who are willing to purchase that beef — whether it’s natural, organic, grass-fed, or corn-finished. The problem I have is when one segment of the beef industry bashes another. This leads to confusion and guilt among consumers when making their beef purchases. The bottom line is that all beef in the U.S. — no matter how it’s raised – is safe, wholesome and nutritious. Here is an excerpt from an article that breaks down the pros and cons of grass-fed vs. corn-fed beef:

“Grass-fed beef is the meat of the moment. The image of cattle dotting green hillsides is an appealing counterpoint to the thought of herds corralled in crowded, grass-free feedlots. Advocates claim a trifecta of advantages: Grass-fed beef is better for you, for the animal and for the planet. Is it?

“Almost always, when I talk to scientists and farmers about food supply issues — whether it’s farm size, organic methods, animal welfare, GMOs, climate impact — the answer is complicated. When it comes to feeding people, there is never one right answer. It depends on the farm, the area, the animal, the crop, the weather, the market and a bazillion other things. Most scientists are quick to tell me that grass-fed isn’t the only way.”

The opinions of Amanda Radke are not necessarily those of Beefmagazine.com or the Penton Farm Progress Group.

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Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualPlanned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual. This is the ideal squeal to A Handbook for Ranch Managers.  Although the ecological principles remain the same, what was originally known as “The Savory Grazing Method” now answers to a multitude of different names: ranching for profit, holistic management, managed grazing, mob grazing, management intensive grazing, etc. Land & Livestock International, Inc. uses “Restoration Grazing” under its “Managing the Ranch as a Business” program.” No mater what you call it, this summary and synopsis will guide you step by step through the process and teach you how to use it as it was originally intended. No more excuses for failing to complete your grazing plans.

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The Best of Asteroid:2014

The 2012 World Champion Bull Asteroid will retire after the 2015 PBR BFTS Iron Cowboy. Watch his best outs of 2014.

About the Professional Bull Riders:

The premier bull riding organization in the world began as a dream of 20 bull riders 23 years ago and is now a global sports phenomenon. PBR broadcasts reach more than half a billion households in 50 nations and territories around the world, and more than 2.5 million fans attend live events each year. The PBR features the Top 35 bull riders in the world and the top bulls in the business. Three circuits, the televised Built Ford Tough Series, the BlueDEF Velocity Tour and the Touring Pro Division, have paid more than $140 million in earnings to its athletes. Twenty-seven men have earned more than $1 million, including three-time World Champion Silvano Alves who, in just 54 months, won more than $5.2 million to become the richest bull rider in history. 2013 World Champion J.B. Mauney and two-time World Champion Justin McBride have also surpassed $5.1 million in earnings. For more information on the PBR, go to PBR.com, or follow on Facebook at Facebook.com/PBR, Twitter at Twitter.com/PBR, and YouTube at YouTube.com/PBR.

The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits  A Handbook for Ranch Managers Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual Combat Shooter's Handbook

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View

FOLLOW LAND & LIVESTOCK INTERNATIONAL ON FACEBOOK

Check out our WebSite

Check out our Online Rancher Supply Store

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersA Handbook for Ranch Managers.  In keeping with the “holistic” idea that the land, the livestock, the people and the money should be viewed as a single integrated whole: Part I deals with the management of the natural resources. Part II covers livestock production and Part III deals with the people and the money. Not only would this book make an excellent basic text for a university program in Ranch Management, no professional ranch manager’s reference bookshelf should be without it. It is a comprehensive reference manual for managing the working ranch. The information in the appendices and extensive bibliography alone is worth the price of the book.

You might be interested in this books supplement: Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual.

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UN Climate Boss Resigns in Scandal, Says Mission Is “Religion”

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewNot so coincidentally, Part I of Environmental and Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View is entitled Environmentalism: The New State Religion and Part II is devoted to Debunking the New State Religion.

Indeed it is a cult. — jtl, 419

by  Alex Newman via The New American

UN Climate Boss Resigns in Scandal, Says Mission Is “Religion”As if to confirm the widespread view among skeptics of man-made climate-change theories that global-warming alarmism is akin to a religious cult, United Nations “climate science” boss Rajendra K. Pachauri admitted in his resignation letter this week that his crusade to purportedly save the planet from CO2 is more than just a mission — it is his “religion.” The chairman of the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) was forced to step down this week after 13 years on the job amid accusations and court proceedings surrounding alleged sexual harassment, stalking, and criminal intimidation of a female researcher.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) Perhaps more important than why he is stepping down is the explosive revelation contained in his resignation letter hinting at the true nature of his radical cause. “For me the protection of Planet Earth, the survival of all species and sustainability of our ecosystems is more than a mission,” Pachauri wrote. “It is my religion and my dharma.” According to the Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions, the term dharma in Hinduism is a “fundamental concept” that refers to “the order and custom which make life and a universe possible, and thus to the behaviors appropriate to the maintenance of that order.” It was traditionally associated with sacrifices to the Hindu gods.

A Handbook for Ranch Managers Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual Of course, critics and skeptics of the UN IPCC — who have pointed out the UN’s failed alarmist predictions and its increasingly outlandish pronouncements — have long contended that anthropogenic (man-made) global warming (AGW) theorists are a cult. One of the primary reasons for the association is that despite observable evidence discrediting virtually every falsifiable forecast offered by the UN-backed alarmist camp (warming and cooling), AGW believers continue to cling to their theory. For example, there has been no global warming in almost two decades, as Pachauri admitted, despite UN IPCC predictions of accelerated temperature increases. Too, there have been record-high levels of sea ice in recent years, again defying alarmist forecasts.

The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits Combat Shooter's HandbookLike a cult, the alarmists defend the theory with increasing extremism, even calling for skeptics to be re-educated, imprisoned, and executed. Pachuri himself publicly wished in 2010 that skeptics of his theory would “apply asbestos to their faces every day.” Citing those trends, just last month, MIT Meteorology Professor Emeritus Richard Lindzen publicly compared the alarmist movement to a religious cult. “As with any cult, once the mythology of the cult begins falling apart, instead of saying, ‘oh, we were wrong,’ they get more and more fanatical,” he said. “I think that’s what’s happening here. Think about it…. You’ve led an unpleasant life, you haven’t led a very virtuous life, but now you’re told, you get absolution if you watch your carbon footprint. It’s salvation!”

During the United Nations Rio+20 Conference on Sustainable Development in 2012, Christ the Redeemer — Rio de Janeiro’s most famous landmark, a massive statue of Jesus Christ on top of Corcovado mountain overlooking Rio — was illuminated using bright green lights. AGW skeptics at the radical UN confab told this reporter that the stunt was a fitting symbol for the controversial summit in more ways than one. Lord Christopher Monckton, a policy advisor to former U.K. Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and one of the most well-known opponents of the UN’s supposed environmental agenda, called it “a kind of childish message that the environmental religion is now replacing Christianity.” Attending the conference made that clear as well.

According to Lord Monckton, those who have lost the “true faith” nevertheless felt the need for religion and a common bond between themselves — and thought they had found it “in the spurious nostrums of Marxist environmentalism.” Indeed, shortly before the UN “sustainability” summit began, green legend James Lovelock — the scientist and environmentalist who first came up with the whole Earth-as-goddess “Gaia” concept — warned that the “green religion” was now “taking over from the Christian religion.” Numerous experts, Christians, and scientists have made similar arguments in recent years.

Two years before the UN Rio+20 sustainability summit, meanwhile, a UN “climate” summit in Cancun began with UN climate-policy boss Christiana Figueres offering a prayer to the ancient Mayan jaguar goddess known as Ixchel. Describing the mythic entity as a goddess associated with the moon, reason, creativity, and weaving — while carefully omitting Ixchel’s association with war, human sacrifice, and cannibalism — Figueres called on Ixchel to “inspire” the climate delegates.

“May she inspire you, because today, you are gathered in Cancun to weave together the elements of a solid response to climate change, using both reason and creativity as your tools,” Figueres said in the opening speech. “Excellencies, the goddess Ixchel would probably tell you that a tapestry is the result of the skillful interlacing of many threads…. I am convinced that 20 years from now, we will admire the policy tapestry that you have woven together and think back fondly to Cancun and the inspiration of Ixchel.” More recently, Figueres admitted the UN was seeking to transform the world’s economic system and claimed the godless Communist Chinese system was better suited to fight “global warming” than the U.S. Constitution and the government it created.

With Pachauri’s admission that his zeal to supposedly save the planet from humans and their essentially insignificant CO2emissions — a fraction of one percent of the greenhouse gases naturally in the atmosphere — is actually a religious calling, critics say it is time for a major overhaul of the “missionary” UN IPCC. Among the voices calling for reform was the Global Warming Policy Forum, which has long warned that the IPCC leadership was losing scientific objectivity and adopting environmentalism as a missionary cause.

During Pachauri’s tenure, the GWPF said, the world has witnessed a “near-complete shutting down of open scientific debate, militant hostility to any questioning of the claims or assertions of the IPCC, and the zealous promulgation of costly and irrational energy policies with inadequate regard for the balancing of human costs and benefits.” “It is clear that a missionary environmentalist mindset has been embedded at the highest levels of the IPCC, and we reiterate our concerns that it has been spreading throughout the organization, with the full support of the leadership,” the forum continued in its statement about Pachauri’s admission.

“We call upon policymakers to begin asking some overdue questions about this organization upon which they rely so heavily,” the GWPF concluded. “In particular, we are left to wonder how Dr. Pachauri’s extreme biases have affected the work of the IPCC in recent years and the advice it gives to governments.”

Climate Depot editor Marc Morano, meanwhile, suggested that Pachauri’s departure would offer a big boost to the IPCC, but that it should have come years ago. “If Pachauri had any decency, he would have resigned in the wake of the Climategate scandal which broke in 2009,” Morano said in a statement, referring to the infamous e-mails showing “climate scientists” conspiring to unlawfully mislead the world about their theory. “Climategate implicated the upper echelon of UN IPCC scientists in attempting to collude and craft a narrative on global warming while allowing no dissent. Or Pachauri could have resigned when he … conceded that the IPCC was at the ‘beck and call’ of governments.”

“There were so many opportunities to do the right thing and fade away,” added Morano, a former staffer for current Senate Environment Committee Chairman and prominent AGW skeptic Senator James Inhofe (R-Okla.). “But it took the proceedings of the Indian court system over the allegations of sexual harassment to finally bring Pachauri down. Things can only be looking up for the UN IPCC now that it has ridded itself of this political and ethical cancer.”

Fiddling with the data and pumping out unwarranted alarmism have become par for the course at the UN. Apparently, though, sexual harassment is common at the UN as well. A 2009 Wall Street Journal report noted that the outfit has been struggling to deal with “an embarrassing string of sexual-harassment complaints within its own ranks.” In addition to widespread sexual harassment, UN “peace” troops have been exposed systematically raping and sexually exploiting civilians and children from the Ivory Coast and Somalia to Haiti and Cambodia. In just one Ivorian town, a survey of minor girls revealed that eight out of 10 admitted to regularly being raped and forced into sexual acts by UN soldiers.

Of course, Pachauri is not the only top-level AGW theorist to be accused of sexual harassment, either. Former U.S. vice president and self-styled climate expert Al Gore, for example, in addition to being embarrassingly wrong on his outlandish predictions, has been accused of sexual assault by multiple alleged victims. Some commentators even suggested that Gore, who has profited handsomely from the alarmism he promotes, would be a good candidate to take Pachauri’s job.

A better proposal, though, would be for the U.S. government to withdraw from the UN and defund its religious climate charade. After all, the First Amendment prohibits Congress from making any laws respecting an establishment of religion. If Pachauri’s resignation letter is to be believed, funding the IPCC and the UN’s climate hysteria with U.S. tax dollars is promoting a (pseudo-)religion and therefore, unconstitutional by definition.

Photo of Rajendra K. Pachauri: Marshall.niles

Alex Newman is a correspondent for The New American, covering economics, education, politics, and more. Follow him on Twitter @ALEXNEWMAN_JOU. He can be reached at: anewman@thenewamerican.com

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View

edited by

Dr Jimmy T (Gunny) LaBaume

Is now available in both PAPERBACK and Kindle

BookCoverImageMurray N. Rothbard was the father of what some call Radical Libertarianism or Anarcho-Capitalism which Hans-Hermann Hoppe described as “Rothbard’s unique contribution to the rediscovery of property and property rights as the common foundation of both economics and political philosophy, and the systematic reconstruction and conceptual integration of modern, marginalist economics and natural-law political philosophy into a unified moral science: libertarianism.”

This book applies the principles of this “unified moral science” to environmental and natural resource management issues.

The book started out life as an assigned reading list for a university level course entitled Environmental and Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View.

As I began to prepare to teach the course, I quickly saw that there was a plethora of textbooks suitable for universal level courses dealing with environmental and natural resource economics. The only problem was that they were all based in mainstream neo-classical (or Keynesian) theory. I could find no single collection of material comprising a comprehensive treatment of environmental and natural resource economics based on Austrian Economic Theory.

However, I was able to find a large number of essays, monographs, papers delivered at professional meetings and published from a multitude of sources. This book is the result. It is composed of a collection of research reports and essays by reputable scientists, economists, and legal experts as well as private property and free market activists.

The book is organized into seven parts: I. Environmentalism: The New State Religion; II. The New State Religion Debunked; III. Introduction to Environmental and Natural Resource Economics; IV. Interventionism: Law and Regulation; V. Pollution and Recycling; VI. Property Rights: Planning, Zoning and Eminent Domain; and VII. Free Market Conservation. It also includes an elaborate Bibliography, References and Recommended Reading section including an extensive Annotated Bibliography of related and works on the subject.

The intellectual level of the individual works ranges from quite scholarly to informed editorial opinion.

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5 resources addressing hormones & beef

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualSome day, “if” I ever get time (“if” frogs carried machine guns, birds wouldn’t screw with them), I’m going to research and write up a history of how and where these silly ideas (that fly in the face of the fundamental ideas of America) originated and how they have evolved. 

The hypothesis (based on personal experience and observation) is that their origin was in the Marxist revolution that took place during the Vietnam era and its aftermath–the Club of Rome’s “Limits to Growth,” Rachel Carson’s “Silent Spring” and Paul Ehrlich’s “Population, Resources and Environment”– all of which have been debunked but not yet completely abandoned as they should be. — jtl, 419A Handbook for Ranch Managers

By  Amanda Radke in BEEF Daily

While hormones are naturally occurring in both people and the foods we eat, an increase in early onset puberty (before age 8 in girls and age 9 in boys) has many parents worried and looking for the culprit. Beef is drawing scrutiny from some parents, but this association isn’t based on facts.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewOne of the biggest misconceptions that continue to plague the beef industry is the concern regarding hormones in beef.

While hormones are naturally occurring in both people and the foods we eat, an increase in early onset puberty (before age 8 in girls and age 9 in boys) has many parents worried and looking for the culprit. Beef is drawing scrutiny from some parents, but this association isn’t based on facts.

The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsI did some online research and found that health sites generally point to these factors as increasing a child’s risk of precocious puberty:

  • “Being a girl. Girls are much more likely to develop precocious puberty.
  • “Being African-American. Precocious puberty affects African-Americans more often than children of other races.
  • “Being obese. If your daughter is significantly overweight, she has a higher risk of developing precocious puberty.
  • “Being exposed to sex hormones. Coming in contact with an estrogen or testosterone cream or ointment, or other substances that contain these hormones (such as an adult’s medication or dietary supplements), can increase your child’s risk of developing precocious puberty.
  • “Having other medical conditions. Precocious puberty may be a complication of McCune-Albright syndrome or congenital adrenal hyperplasia — conditions that involve abnormal production of the male hormones (androgens). In rare cases, precocious puberty may also be associated with hypothyroidism.
  • “Having received radiation therapy of the central nervous system. Radiation treatment for tumors, leukemia or other conditions can increase the risk of precocious puberty.”

Combat Shooter's HandbookBeyond precocious puberty, it is generally acknowledged that children are reaching puberty earlier today, most likely due to better health care and nutrition. Here is some food for thought about hormones in foods worth sharing on social media today.

A steak vs. a potato — which one has more hormones? Allen Young, Utah State University Extension dairy specialist and associate professor, developed a graphic that illustrates the estrogen present in a variety of foods.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) Young writes, “Hormones and their relationship to food are a hot topic today. In addition to the hormones your body makes, there are other sources of hormones. Animals and plants produce hormones naturally, so we eat hormones in our food all the time, but the amounts we take in are low compared to what our bodies produce naturally. Let’s use estrogen as an example.”

The table below shows that a 3-ounce serving of a potato has 225 nanograms (ng) of estrogen, whereas a 3-ounce serving of a steak only has 1.9 ng of estrogen. For comparison, the average adolescent girl has 93,000 ng of estrogen present. It’s doubtful a steak is going to disrupt her hormones and cause her to reach puberty at an early stage.

In addition to the table above, I’ve rounded up five resources to “beef” up your knowledge on hormones and beef that would be good to share with consumers as well.

  1. Confusion about GMOs & hormones in milk & meat leads to advocacy moment
  2. A visual to add to your arsenal about hormones and beef
  3. What price does the world pay for shunning technology?
  4. When it comes to technology, should we educate or eliminate?
  5. Beef headlines: Chipotle, ex-vegetarians, antibiotics & hormones

In your opinion, what is the best way to address consumer concerns about hormones and beef? Share your thoughts in the comments section below.

The opinions of Amanda Radke are not necessarily those of Beefmagazine.com or the Penton Farm Progress Group.

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Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualPlanned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual. This is the ideal squeal to A Handbook for Ranch Managers.  Although the ecological principles remain the same, what was originally known as “The Savory Grazing Method” now answers to a multitude of different names: ranching for profit, holistic management, managed grazing, mob grazing, management intensive grazing, etc. Land & Livestock International, Inc. uses “Restoration Grazing” under its “Managing the Ranch as a Business” program.” No mater what you call it, this summary and synopsis will guide you step by step through the process and teach you how to use it as it was originally intended. No more excuses for failing to complete your grazing plans.

Posted in Food and Fiber Issues | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Horse Training and Stallions

I have a story of my own (imagine that lol) about a stallion.

Actually, the story is about an old uncle who was (I think) working for the 6es at the time. Somehow he found himself horseback in the alley way of a barn with a stallion in the ally with them. The stallion grabbed uncle Roy’s leggings with his teeth, drug him off of his horse and proceeded to bang his head against the stall doors all up and down the alley.

The moral to the story is two fold: 1) never turn your back on a stud horse and; 2) as I told my children, if you decide to work with horses, know that you WILL eventually get hurt–it is not a question of”if” but only a question of “when.” — jtl

Dear Friend and Horseman,

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersHere it is, Springtime again. I both love and hate this time of year. I love it for the nice weather, spring flowers etc. I also hate it because this is the time of year when the 3 year-old stallions get zapped with their first big dose of testosterone. It turns some of them into holey terrors. It’s also the time of year when the mares start to cycle, driving the young stallions crazy. All this makes a trainer’s job more difficult, oftentimes unpleasant and sometimes down right dangerous. But that’s just part of the profession, you take the bad with the good.

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualIf you have a stallion and you are inexperienced with studs, let me share with you my personal philosophy…

If your stallion ever gives you that “I’m going to get you” look, it would probably be wise to let a more experienced handler take over. No stud is worth getting hurt or killed over. Hardly anybody realizes it but many people have been injured by stallions. More people than you would ever imagine, have been maimed or killed.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewNow, let me make something perfectly clear… Not all stallions are overly aggressive. In fact some of the best horses I’ve ever ridden were stallions. However, let me point out that they were the exception, not the rule.

If a stallion is to become a sire, he should be exceptional. To my way of thinking, the only horse that deserves to be a stud is one that possesses those exceptionally good qualities and consistently passes them on to his offspring.
www.HorseTrainingVideos.com

The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits    Combat Shooter's HandbookOn the other side of the coin, we have the problem stallions. These are the ones you need to watch out for. These are the ones that are overly aggressive and threaten to get you. This over-aggressiveness is sometimes a stallion’s normal behavior. Sometimes the aggressiveness is man-made. Either way, it’s dangerous.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) Some owners who have a problem stallion, refuse to castrate them. These folks have not been viciously mauled… yet. Their time will come.

I have been attacked several times and luckily escaped without serious injury. But, I have personally witnessed people getting maimed by studs. One guy lost his ear and part of his shoulder muscle. Another guy was almost mauled to death before anyone could get the stud off him.

A trainer friend of mine came crawling to the show arena on his hands and knees, covered in blood. His cutting stallion had attacked and mauled him just a few minutes prior to the class. Pretty scary stuff.

Most people don’t have a clue how quickly a stallion can change from “passive” to “attacking”. Seldom do you have much warning. With experience, you can learn to read a stud and learn what they are thinking. But, the learning process can be a little risky.

I remember well the first time I was attacked by a stallion. I was 10 years old. I wanted a palomino stallion in the worst way and to my surprise my folks got me one. (In my parent’s defense, I should tell you I had horses since I was 7 and was a heck of a good rider by the time I was 10. They just didn’t realize the danger).

I can remember it like it was yesterday. It was Spring, a Friday and I was walking home from school. As I came down the driveway and into the barnyard, there was a cattle truck parked there at the loading chute. My folks were standing there talking to the driver of the truck. I approached and asked what was going on. With an enthusiastic smile on her face, my Mom said there was a surprise waiting for me in the barn.

Just then I heard the unmistakable scream of an excited stallion and I knew my dream horse was inside our barn.

I ran to the barn and went inside. Standing loose in the big stall was a beautiful palomino stallion with a white mane and tail. He was short, about 14.1 hands, but he was stout. He was upset because he could see the mares standing outside in the pasture and he wanted to get out there with them.

I should have known better than to go in his stall without haltering him first, but I went in to pet him anyway. As I walked up to pet his neck, he opened his mouth wide, like an alligator, and lightning-fast took hold of my shoulder. He picked me up, shook me like a rag doll, then threw me into the corner.

He wasn’t finished with me yet! I’m on the ground and here he comes again with his mouth wide open. Man, I was scared. I figured here he comes again and I’m a gonner. My hands and legs were flailing about trying to fend him off. Just by shear luck, I hit the stud in the eye just as he was coming in to bite me again. The poke in the eye startled him enough to give me time to get the heck out of there.

If you have children who love horses, pay close attention to this next part.

There I was, 10 years old, shirt all torn up and I’m hurt bad. What would you guess I did next? If you guessed I ran to my parents and showed them what had happened, you guessed wrong. If they knew the stud had attacked me, they would have gotten rid of him.

I was way more afraid of losing the horse than getting mauled again!

I stayed in the barn until the coast was clear, then ran to the house, cleaned myself up and went upstairs to my room before anyone suspected anything. While I was going up the stairs, my two younger sisters saw my injured shoulder and I had to bribe them to keep their mouth shut. (Actually, during my entire childhood, I had to continually bribe them to keep quiet about stuff I had done).

Next morning, I was up at dawn. I fed all the horses but not the stud. I had other plans for him and I had to do them before my parents came outside.

First thing I did was rope that rank little stud in the stall and snub him up real short to the corner post. I managed to get him saddled and bridled without getting bitten. The next part was the most dangerous. I had to figure out a way to get him out of the barn and get on him without being attacked.

The stud had that mean, “I’m going to get you” look in his eye, so I knew I didn’t dare untie and lead him. Instead, I climbed on his back first, gathered up the reins and then untied him from the safety of the saddle. Once he realized he was untied, he bogged his head and gave a couple of crow hops but nothing too bad.

I stayed on his back while opening the stall gate. Once we were outside, I headed him up the drive way and away we went. I figured I would tire him out by riding him to all the neighboring farms and ranches and show them my new stallion.

That little palomino son-of-a-gun was rank… and not very broke. For the first hour all he did was scream and run off with me. After about three hours though, he was dripping with sweat and starting to run out of steam. I just kept riding him and visiting all my friends in the area.

By the time we returned home, it was almost dark. And guess what? That little stud was too tired to do anything but hang his head and put one foot in front of the other. When we got to the barn, I fed him a double ration of hay and said good night.

The following morning, when I went out to feed, my little stallion had a different expression on his face. That mean “I’m going to get you” look was gone. He still was a handful to saddle and bridle. And he still tried to bite me, but the “viciousness” was no longer there.

I gave him another “all day” ride. And for the next two weeks, I rode him everyday before and after school. I rode him so much, that stud thought he had died and gone to hell. Within a month he was dog gentle.

I learned a lot about horse nature from that little stud. Most of all though, I learned that the easiest horses to get along with are the tired ones.

Take care and have fun training your horse.

Larry Trocha
Larry Trocha

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A Handbook for Ranch ManagersA Handbook for Ranch Managers.  In keeping with the “holistic” idea that the land, the livestock, the people and the money should be viewed as a single integrated whole: Part I deals with the management of the natural resources. Part II covers livestock production and Part III deals with the people and the money. Not only would this book make an excellent basic text for a university program in Ranch Management, no professional ranch manager’s reference bookshelf should be without it. It is a comprehensive reference manual for managing the working ranch. The information in the appendices and extensive bibliography alone is worth the price of the book.

You might be interested in this books supplement: Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual.

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Divided Lands: State vs. Federal Management in the West

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersAt 35 pages, this is a tad long for a blog post. But, it is a well done and documented study and well worth the read. Follow the link at the bottom to continue reading.

Even if you don’t live in a “public land state” every American citizen (subject) should be aware of the ineptitude and waste that takes place within the federal land management agencies. — jtl, 419Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual

by Holly Fretwell and Shawn Regan

Property and Environment Research Center (PERC)

Working Paper PERC Public Lands Report February 2015

Introduction

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewThere is a great divide in the United States. Land in the East is mostly privately owned, while nearly half of the land in the West is owned by the federal government. In recent years, several western states have passed, introduced, or considered resolutions demanding that the federal government transfer much of this land to state ownership.1 These efforts are motivated by local concerns over federal land management, including restrictions on natural resource development, poor land stewardship, limitations on access, and low financial returns.

The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits    Combat Shooter's HandbookThe resolutions reflect a sentiment in many western states that state control will result in better public land management. To date, however, there has been little research comparing the costs of state and federal land management. Most existing studies assume that the costs of federal land management would be the same under state management and do not consider the different management goals, regulatory requirements, and incentive structures that govern state and federal lands.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) The purpose of this report is to compare state and federal land management in the West. In particular, we examine the revenues and expenditures associated with federal land management and compare them with state trust land management in four western states: Montana, Idaho, New Mexico, and Arizona. These states, which encompass a wide range of landscapes, natural resources, and land management agencies, allow for a robust comparison. Our analysis will help explain why revenues and expenditures may differ between state and federal land agencies and explore some of the implications of transferring federal lands to the states.

We find that state trust agencies produce far greater financial returns from land management than federal land agencies. In fact, the federal government often loses money managing valuable natural resources. States, on the other hand, consistently generate significant amounts of revenue from state trust lands. On average, states earn more revenue per dollar spent than the federal government for each of the natural resources we examined, including timber, grazing, minerals, and recreation.

Click Here to Continue Reading

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View

edited by

Dr Jimmy T (Gunny) LaBaume

Is now available in both PAPERBACK and Kindle

BookCoverImageMurray N. Rothbard was the father of what some call Radical Libertarianism or Anarcho-Capitalism which Hans-Hermann Hoppe described as “Rothbard’s unique contribution to the rediscovery of property and property rights as the common foundation of both economics and political philosophy, and the systematic reconstruction and conceptual integration of modern, marginalist economics and natural-law political philosophy into a unified moral science: libertarianism.”

This book applies the principles of this “unified moral science” to environmental and natural resource management issues.

The book started out life as an assigned reading list for a university level course entitled Environmental and Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View.

As I began to prepare to teach the course, I quickly saw that there was a plethora of textbooks suitable for universal level courses dealing with environmental and natural resource economics. The only problem was that they were all based in mainstream neo-classical (or Keynesian) theory. I could find no single collection of material comprising a comprehensive treatment of environmental and natural resource economics based on Austrian Economic Theory.

However, I was able to find a large number of essays, monographs, papers delivered at professional meetings and published from a multitude of sources. This book is the result. It is composed of a collection of research reports and essays by reputable scientists, economists, and legal experts as well as private property and free market activists.

The book is organized into seven parts: I. Environmentalism: The New State Religion; II. The New State Religion Debunked; III. Introduction to Environmental and Natural Resource Economics; IV. Interventionism: Law and Regulation; V. Pollution and Recycling; VI. Property Rights: Planning, Zoning and Eminent Domain; and VII. Free Market Conservation. It also includes an elaborate Bibliography, References and Recommended Reading section including an extensive Annotated Bibliography of related and works on the subject.

The intellectual level of the individual works ranges from quite scholarly to informed editorial opinion.

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Posted in Private Property and Free Markets, Private Property Rights, Private Property Rights on the "Public" Domain, Public Domain, Public Lands, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Ranch Diaries: Why we manage our cattle horseback

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual High Country News is mostly devoted to spittle chinned Marxists. (I subscribe in order to keep up with what the enemy is up to.) But on rare occasion, they publish a pretty good article. This happens to be one of those.

As I was saying just the other day, low stress cattle handling is best done horseback especially on large ranches in the desert Southwest. — jtl, 419

Rough terrain and big country make horses an ideal way to manage for gentle cattle.

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersLast week, the remaining patches of ice melted on Fence Canyon Road, the main entrance to the ranch, enabling cattle trucks to get to the corrals at headquarters. Our neighbors helped us drive 180 steers seven miles to pasture, where they joined 500 others. The new steers would have trotted all the way if we’d let them, but for us, a successful cattle drive happens at a walk, with the animals strung out as close to single file as possible and riders positioned on both sides of the cattle, rather than having everyone ride in the drag. As our friend Kit explains, “you can’t push a chain from behind.” With a good lead animal in the front, cattle are happy to follow one another.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewOur experience in big country like this has shown the benefits of keeping cattle gentle and working horseback. We use horses instead of ATV’s or pickups for several reasons. In much of this landscape they’re the only way to access the herd and our lease boundary fences. Also, many horses respond intuitively to bovine body language. It’s important to be able to think like a cow. Our stock dogs understand this instinctively. The key is paying attention and developing a feel. Sometimes you have to back off; sometimes you need to apply more pressure. We don’t always get it right, but we’re always learning.

The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits    Combat Shooter's HandbookKeeping cattle calm and content doesn’t just make them easier to handle, it boosts their reproductive performance and weight gain while reducing operational management expenses. One of us and a dog or two might gather and move 100 head or more, but if an animal has been on its own for a while, it can get flighty and nervous, or “spoiled.” This past cold and sleeting Wednesday, Sam found a heifer outside of our lease. She ran off as soon as she saw him. He roped her—since she refused to drive home—and led her two miles back to the other heifers at a walk. It’s hard to justify spending most of a day with one animal when we have hundreds more to look after.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) In addition to creating well-adjusted cattle, daily management horseback seems a good way to prevent potential problems. We make sure fences are up and gates are closed. We can easily get to and monitor water sources and check the mineral supplement we place nearby. It’s a good way to see what plants the cattle are grazing and browsing. Right now, we’re making sure they aren’t eating too much oak brush. Its tannins are toxic when ingested in large quantities. Every day is an opportunity to use our horsemanship and stockmanship skills and develop our eye for herd health and behavior, learning our cattle’s individual personalities while connecting with the land we’re working on.

Ranch Diaries is a fresh hcn.org series highlighting the experiences of Laura Jean Schneider, a member of a new generation of cattle ranchers. In this series, Schneider gives us a peek into daily life during the first year of Triangle P Cattle Company, a new LLC in southcentral New Mexico. Installments appear every second and fourth Tuesdays of the month.  

Photographs by the author, of Sam Ryerson settling heifers, working on cattle pens, and the author checking fences horseback. 

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Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualPlanned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual. This is the ideal squeal to A Handbook for Ranch Managers.  Although the ecological principles remain the same, what was originally known as “The Savory Grazing Method” now answers to a multitude of different names: ranching for profit, holistic management, managed grazing, mob grazing, management intensive grazing, etc. Land & Livestock International, Inc. uses “Restoration Grazing” under its “Managing the Ranch as a Business” program.” No mater what you call it, this summary and synopsis will guide you step by step through the process and teach you how to use it as it was originally intended. No more excuses for failing to complete your grazing plans.

Posted in Low Stress Livestock Handling | Tagged , | 1 Comment

Cattle Futures Break Accelerates

So the blame has been laid on declining demand, both for beef and for cattle futures contracts.

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersThe demand for beef is a “derived” demand. It starts at the supermarket meat counter and works its way back through the marketing chain to the cow-calf operator. Sooner or later prices will get so high and/or quality so low that even SWAMBO (She Who Must Be Obeyed) will start substituting chicken and fish. — jtl

By Cassie Fish, CassandraFish.com in The Beef

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualThe downtrend in CME live cattle futures which started in December and has continued pretty much since, is as huge as it is unique. On a spot basis, it’s $23.60 off the all-time high. But with record discounts in the deferreds it seems even bigger.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewThe tight beef supply driver of 2014 will still be with us until late in the second quarter. So the blame has been laid on declining demand, both for beef and for cattle futures contracts. Boxed beef cutout prices have and continue to trade well above a year ago through this time frame, but exports have slowed and cheap competing meat supplies have grown. At the same time end users stockpiled trim in the freezer for some protection from what will be another year of small non-fed kill and our huge and growing dependence on imported beef to supply domestic ground beef demand, *up 53% YTD, YOY.

The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsIt’s fascinating and frightening that some of the bearish market factors to have surfaced over the last 3 months, when resolved, have had no positive effect on futures prices afterwards. Most recent case in point is the resolution of the West Coast port labor dispute late Friday.

Live cattle chart patterns now are overwhelmingly bearish and open interest has started a small build as short hedgers lock in losses and money managers following trends both seek and compete to sell any buy orders underneath the collapsing market.

Combat Shooter's HandbookSomething, or perhaps more than one thing, seems to be casting a long and dark shadow over this market. The bears are content to point to total beef production, down 5.1% but boosted 1.7% by record carcass weights and record choice+prime grading as proof of uncurrent feedyards. But as everyone who trades cattle know, packers have and keep turning themselves inside out to make sure they don’t miss out on the very few large strings of fed cattle that trade (basis or otherwise) occasionally in Kansas and Nebraska. Most recently, the widely discussed +$7 over Apr LC trade speaks to both the need to secure inventory and the disbelief in futures trading par to cash, let alone premium. “Tops” trades have already been done this week at $1.50 over, though there will be little actual cash trade at most certainly lower money. Packer margins are improving quickly and could be even to positive by next week.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) As things improve for the packer, maybe cash cattle prices can consolidate in the $150s in March. Interestingly, a year ago this week, the 5-area average was $150.61 and March 2014 saw prices between $149 and $152, begging the question, are the fundamentals really such a wreck that cash cattle prices are headed below year ago levels, as priced by April LC futures?

We won’t have this week’s comprehensive cutout until next Monday, but it was $239.30 last week compared to $218.12 a year ago this week. These numbers seems a clear illustration that the industry is in the midst of a huge transfer dollars from the cattle feeder to the packer.

*Thanks to MP Agrilytics, http://mpagrilytics.com, for providing insightful analysis that contributed to today’s blog.
The Beef is published by Consolidated Beef Producers…for more info click here.

Disclaimer:  The Beef, CBP nor Cassie Fish shall not be liable for decisions or actions taken based on the data/information/opinions.

 

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A Handbook for Ranch ManagersA Handbook for Ranch Managers.  In keeping with the “holistic” idea that the land, the livestock, the people and the money should be viewed as a single integrated whole: Part I deals with the management of the natural resources. Part II covers livestock production and Part III deals with the people and the money. Not only would this book make an excellent basic text for a university program in Ranch Management, no professional ranch manager’s reference bookshelf should be without it. It is a comprehensive reference manual for managing the working ranch. The information in the appendices and extensive bibliography alone is worth the price of the book.

You might be interested in this books supplement: Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual.

Posted in Livestock & Meat Markets | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment
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