Out for the week

I’ll be out of the office all next week but back in the saddle again on Monday, 30 May. Hope y’all have a great and safe week. — jtl

A Handbook for Ranch Managers Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View  Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits Combat Shooter's Handbook 

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersA Handbook for Ranch Managers.  In keeping with the “holistic” idea that the land, the livestock, the people and the money should be viewed as a single integrated whole: Part I deals with the management of the natural resources. Part II covers livestock production and Part III deals with the people and the money. Not only would this book make an excellent basic text for a university program in Ranch Management, no professional ranch manager’s reference bookshelf should be without it. It is a comprehensive reference manual for managing the working ranch. The information in the appendices and extensive bibliography alone is worth the price of the book.

You might also be interested in the supplement to this Handbook: Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Wyoming Rancher Beats EPA In Pond Fight

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersWell, they throw us a bone every now and then. But I’d advise Andy Johnson to watch his six. They’ve been known to murder people they cut deals with. — jtl, 419

Wyoming rancher Andy Johnson talks about his lawsuit against EPA, in news conference in Cheyenne (Photo courtesy Pacific Justice Foundation)

Wyoming rancher Andy Johnson talks about his lawsuit against the EPA, in a news conference in Cheyenne, Wyoming – (Photo courtesy Pacific Justice Foundation)

This article comes from WND.com via Oath Keepers

by Bob Unruh

 Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual A Wyoming rancher threatened by the Environmental Agency with $16 million fines for getting a state permit and building a stock pond on his ranch has reached a settlement that will have the fines go away and he’ll keep his stock pond.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewWND reported in 2015 on a lawsuit filed on behalf of Fort Bridger, Wyoming, rancher Andy Johnson by officialsl with the Pacific Legal Foundation seeking to vindicate his property rights.

The lawsuit explained federal law clearly exempts stock ponds from the rules of the EPA, which had filed a compliance order against him threatening $37,500 in fines per day – which already at the time of the filing had passed $16 million.

Combat Shooter's HandbookNow, officials the PLF has announced the federal government has agreed to resolve the case, and a federal court has approved.

“Importantly, under the settlement, the Johnson family’s pond will remain; they won’t pay any fines; they don’t concede any federal jurisdiction to regulate their pond; and the government won’t pursue any further enforcement actions based on the pond’s construction,” the legal team revealed.

Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute “This is a victory for common sense and the environment, and it brings an end to all the uncertainty and fear that the Johnson family faced,” said Jonathan Wood, a staff attorney with Pacific Legal Foundation.

The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsThe fight began in 2013 when Johnson, under a legitimate state permit, built the stock pond to provide safer, more reliable access to water for his small herd.

Ray Kagel, a former federal regulator, explained how the pond proved to be a benefit to the environment. It created wetlands, habitat for fish and wildlife, and cleans the water that passes through it.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) The federal government responded with its threats of fines.

Johnson tried to reason with the government, without success, so he filed the action that points out “stock ponds” are expressly exempted from the Clean Water Act.

“This settlement is a win for the Johnson family, and a win for the environment,” said Wood. “Under it, the Johnsons will pay no fine. They will not lose their property. They will not have to agree to federal jurisdiction or a federal permit, which would have surely entailed onerous conditions. In effect, the government will treat the pond as an exempt stock pond, in exchange for Andy further improving on the environmental benefits he has already created.

“The settlement provides that Andy will plant willows around the pond and temporarily fence off part of it from livestock. Of course, there is some irony in this last provision: The EPA insists this isn’t a stock pond, while their chief concern is how livestock reach it.”
pond

Johnson, in a statement released by PLF, said, “This is a huge victory for us as well as private property owners across the country. The next family that finds itself in our situation, facing ominous threats from EPA, can take heart in knowing that many of these threats will not come to pass. If, like us, you stand up to the overreaching bureaucrats, they may very well back down.”

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Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualPlanned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual. This is the ideal squeal to A Handbook for Ranch Managers.  Although the ecological principles remain the same, what was originally known as “The Savory Grazing Method” now answers to a multitude of different names: ranching for profit, holistic management, managed grazing, mob grazing, management intensive grazing, etc. Land & Livestock International, Inc. uses “Restoration Grazing” under its “Managing the Ranch as a Business” program.” No mater what you call it, this summary and synopsis will guide you step by step through the process and teach you how to use it as it was originally intended. No more excuses for failing to complete your grazing plans.

Posted in Radical Environmentalism | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

What’s worse than no cattle futures?

Live Cattle futures have become so disconnected from any semblance of reality that their usefulness to cattle producers is suspect at best and damaging at worst.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) The value of cattle futures has long been a topic of discussion in cow country. Is it time for the beef business to again kick the hornet’s nest?

Remember that old saying? The one about if you love something, let it go? Maybe it’s time for the cattle business to do a gut check and find out just how much we love the futures market.

That seems to be a growing sentiment in cattle country. Live Cattle futures have become so disconnected from any semblance of reality that their usefulness to cattle producers is suspect at best and damaging at worst. And Derrell Peel, Extension livestock marketing economist at Oklahoma State University, recently wrote about frustrations with Feeder Cattle futures.

Feeder futures have become increasingly volatile in ways that often appear unrelated to market fundamentals. Erratic futures price movements and increased basis volatility makes it difficult or impossible for the industry to use feeder futures for its two primary roles of risk management and price discovery,” Peel says.

I have, for all of my nearly 40 yards as a very interested observer of this business, defended cattle futures as a necessary part of the overall dynamics of our market. And I have, over those many years, lost a few readers because of it. So be it.

However, the seemingly irrational actions of the futures market gives cause for pause in that thinking. I fully admit that I am not a student of the futures market. I don’t follow it closely, don’t understand it well and have traded cattle and grain futures only sparingly, and that was many years ago.

But a recent Economic Letter from the Dallas Federal Reserve caught my eye. Its title is “Stock Market Provides Imperfect View of Real U.S. Economy” and it says that the stock market, through measures such as the Standard and Poor’s 500, is often thought to be an economic bellwether. However, market volatility compromises the reliability of such indexes.

I don’t know if we can draw parallels between the stock market and the futures market. I’m not an economist. But it’s clear that volatility in cattle futures has compromised that market’s ability to be an economic bellwether for beef producers and the beef business.

Is it time to seriously discuss whether or not cattle futures have a place in the beef business? I think it is.

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersA Handbook for Ranch Managers.  In keeping with the “holistic” idea that the land, the livestock, the people and the money should be viewed as a single integrated whole: Part I deals with the management of the natural resources. Part II covers livestock production and Part III deals with the people and the money. Not only would this book make an excellent basic text for a university program in Ranch Management, no professional ranch manager’s reference bookshelf should be without it. It is a comprehensive reference manual for managing the working ranch. The information in the appendices and extensive bibliography alone is worth the price of the book.

You might also be interested in the supplement to this Handbook: Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual.

Posted in Livestock & Meat Markets | Tagged | Leave a comment

Ranch buy adds to huge Montana wildlife reserve

Its purchase by the American Prairie Reserve comes amid tensions with some in central Montana who see the project’s rapid expansion over the past decade as an encroachment on their way of life.

A Handbook for Ranch Managers Things like this (and they happen every day) just make part of me want to cry and another part of me feels more than anger–it is a fury of diamond like purity. We are, indeed, an endangered species. — jtl, 419

By MATTHEW BROWN via AP.org

Prairie Reserves

This June, 2014 photo provided by Ranch Videos.com shows a portion of the PN Ranch north of…

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A huge Montana nature reserve added a 47,000-acre historic ranch to its patchwork of lands along the Missouri River on Friday, a significant step in a privately funded effort to stitch together a Connecticut-sized park where bison would replace livestock and cattle fences give way to open range.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewThe PN Ranch north of Winifred sprawls across rugged badlands, tall grass prairie and cottonwood-filled valleys. It’s almost wholly within the Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument.

 

Combat Shooter's Handbook Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsIt includes the remnants of the Montana Territory’s first military post, Camp Cooke, and was reportedly a rendezvous point for American Indian tribes on the Great Plains.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)  Its purchase by the American Prairie Reserve comes amid tensions with some in central Montana who see the project’s rapid expansion over the past decade as an encroachment on their way of life.

For now, reserve representatives said, it will be managed as a livestock operation. But the long-term goal is to restore the land to its natural state and open it to the public — campers, bird watchers and others seeking a glimpse into how the West once looked.

“Over time the goal is an all-wildlife, public access situation,” said Sean Gerrity, president of the Bozeman-based reserve. “People will come and the first thing they will notice is ‘Welcome’ signs instead of ‘Keep Out’ signs. They will notice fences down and a distinct openness to the landscape, unfettered by fences, power lines, power poles.”

Terms of the sale were not disclosed. The cattle ranch founded in the late 1800s had been listed for more than $20 million.

Since 2001, American Prairie Reserve has raised $95 million and established a 353,000-acre footprint of leased and private land stretching across five counties.

The purchase of the PN — inside the 378,000-acre Upper Missouri River Breaks — continues the organization’s strategy to use private real estate deals to leverage public lands. Other reserve holdings are within and adjacent to the million-acre C.M. Russell National Wildlife Refuge.

The reserve has 620 bison, which currently don’t have access to the refuge or national monument. That herd is expected to increase to 1,000 bison within the next two years and more than 10,000 animals by late next decade.

Whether wild bison re-inhabit the public lands around the reserve will be largely up to state wildlife officials.

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks officials said last year that they would consider bison on large-scale landscapes like the C.M. Russell refuge. But there’s no timeline for a decision, agency spokesman Ron Aasheim said.

Follow Matthew Brown on Twitter at https://twitter.com/matthewbrownap .

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View

edited by

Dr Jimmy T (Gunny) LaBaume

Is now available in both PAPERBACK and Kindle

BookCoverImageMurray N. Rothbard was the father of what some call Radical Libertarianism or Anarcho-Capitalism which Hans-Hermann Hoppe described as “Rothbard’s unique contribution to the rediscovery of property and property rights as the common foundation of both economics and political philosophy, and the systematic reconstruction and conceptual integration of modern, marginalist economics and natural-law political philosophy into a unified moral science: libertarianism.”

This book applies the principles of this “unified moral science” to environmental and natural resource management issues.

The book started out life as an assigned reading list for a university level course entitled Environmental and Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View.

As I began to prepare to teach the course, I quickly saw that there was a plethora of textbooks suitable for universal level courses dealing with environmental and natural resource economics. The only problem was that they were all based in mainstream neo-classical (or Keynesian) theory. I could find no single collection of material comprising a comprehensive treatment of environmental and natural resource economics based on Austrian Economic Theory.

However, I was able to find a large number of essays, monographs, papers delivered at professional meetings and published from a multitude of sources. This book is the result. It is composed of a collection of research reports and essays by reputable scientists, economists, and legal experts as well as private property and free market activists.

The book is organized into seven parts: I. Environmentalism: The New State Religion; II. The New State Religion Debunked; III. Introduction to Environmental and Natural Resource Economics; IV. Interventionism: Law and Regulation; V. Pollution and Recycling; VI. Property Rights: Planning, Zoning and Eminent Domain; and VII. Free Market Conservation. It also includes an elaborate Bibliography, References and Recommended Reading section including an extensive Annotated Bibliography of related and works on the subject.

The intellectual level of the individual works ranges from quite scholarly to informed editorial opinion.

FOLLOW LAND & LIVESTOCK INTERNATIONAL ON FACEBOOK

Check out our WebSite

Check out our Online Rancher Supply Store

Posted in Public Lands Ranching, Uncategorized | Tagged | 1 Comment

Losing the animal rights war

 So, FEI won, but lost. Ultimately, the groups prosecuted under RICO laws got what they wanted…That’s worth pondering as the beef industry and peers in other livestock sectors continue figuring out how to address groundless charges brought against them by the same circle of activists.

A Handbook for Ranch Managers “Animal Rights” is only one battle in the much larger Culture War. — jtl, 419

by via Beef Magazine

There will no longer be an elephant act in a Ringling Bros. circus.

Ringing Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus (RBBB) led its iconic Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual  elephants into a public performance of its traveling circus for the last time May 1. It ends a chapter in that entertainment organization’s history that started when P.T. Barnum purchased and transported Jumbo—perhaps the most famous elephant in history—to North America in the late 1800s.

Feld Entertainment, Inc. (FEI), owned by the Feld family, owns RBBB. Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewTheir decision to retire their performing elephants is a sobering lesson in winning a hard-fought battle at the expense of a war. It also underscores how the tip of the populist tail can fell societal institutions, in no meager part, via felony crime and skullduggery.

You likely remember at least parts of the legal story that ran for more than a decade.

Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits Combat Shooter's Handbook  The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), the Fund for Animals, the Animal Welfare Institute and others filed suit in July of 2000, alleging violations of the Endangered Species Act. Basically, they wanted to prohibit circuses from entertaining with elephants, so they alleged the abuse of them.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)In July the following year, the U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C., dismissed the suit. On appeal, the case was reinstated in 2003. At that time, the appeals court ruled that if Tom Rider—one of the original plaintiffs, a former RBBB employee—could prove that he was “aesthetically injured” by Ringling Bros.’ treatment of the elephants, the case could proceed.

Instead of proving such injury, by the end of 2009, another federal court dismissed the case once again, finding, “…that Mr. Rider is essentially a paid plaintiff and fact witness who is not credible, and therefore [this court] affords no weight to his testimony regarding the matters discussed herein, i.e., the allegations related to his standing to sue.”

The court discovered that plaintiff organizations, their lawyers and an entity controlled by those lawyers—Wildlife Advocacy Project—paid Rider at least $190,000 over the course of eight years—his sole source of income.

The court also found “…that ensuring Mr. Rider’s continued participation as a plaintiff was a motivating factor behind the payments to him, and that these payments were a motivating factor for his continued involvement in the case.”

The court also ruled against the other plaintiffs, saying they had no standing to sue under Article III of the United States Constitution.

Those plaintiffs appealed, of course.

A federal appeals court unanimously affirmed the dismissal of the case in October of 2011.

In its ruling, a three-judge circuit court panel affirmed the trial court’s determination that Rider was, “essentially a paid plaintiff and fact witness who is not credible…it is undisputed that between March 2000 and December 2008, (lead plaintiff) Rider received at least $190,000 from the organizational plaintiffs in this lawsuit, as well as from an organization run by plaintiffs’ attorneys.”

The plaintiffs sought a re-hearing, which was denied in January of 2012.

By that point in time, John Simpson, lead counsel for Feld Entertainment, noted, “Our client was forced to spend more than $20 million to defend this manufactured case, which was dismissed on the same grounds nearly eleven years ago in 2001.”

As might be imagined, FEI sought its own day in court, filing racketeering and conspiracy claims against the groups. We’re talking RICO—the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organization Act—the one established in 1970 as part of the Organized Crime Control Act to go after the Mafia.

Specifically, FEI filed a federal lawsuit against ASPCA, the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) and other animal rights activists and their lawyers for racketeering violations, malicious prosecution, abuse of process, and the Virginia Conspiracy Act. In July of 2012, the court upheld its right to proceed with the lawsuit.

In December 2012, the ASPCA settled its share of the lawsuits by paying Feld Entertainment $9.3 million.

In May of 2014, HSUS, along with their co-defendants, paid Feld Entertainment $15.75 million to settle the case.

In March last year, the Feld family announced plans to remove elephants from their traveling circuses and relocate them to the Ringling Bros. Center for Elephant Conservation in Florida.

So, FEI won, but lost. Ultimately, the groups prosecuted under RICO laws got what they wanted.

That’s worth pondering as the beef industry and peers in other livestock sectors continue figuring out how to address groundless charges brought against them by the same circle of activists.

So long, Jumbo.

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersA Handbook for Ranch Managers.  In keeping with the “holistic” idea that the land, the livestock, the people and the money should be viewed as a single integrated whole: Part I deals with the management of the natural resources. Part II covers livestock production and Part III deals with the people and the money. Not only would this book make an excellent basic text for a university program in Ranch Management, no professional ranch manager’s reference bookshelf should be without it. It is a comprehensive reference manual for managing the working ranch. The information in the appendices and extensive bibliography alone is worth the price of the book.

You might also be interested in the supplement to this Handbook: Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual.

Posted in Animal Rights, Uncategorized | Tagged , | 1 Comment

A Perfect Storm

Flyover-Press.com

 Any lie and any materially misleading statement — and she is prone to both — made to the FBI can form the basis for an independent criminal charge against her. This is the environment that trapped Martha Stewart.

Combat Shooter's HandbookThe difference is that Martha Stewart is a fine lady that produces things that people express a need or desire for through voluntary exchange and Billary Clinton is a worthless PO(Communist)S. — jtl, 419

By Andrew P. Napolitano via LewRockwell.com

Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute

The bad legal news for Hillary Clinton continued to cascade upon her presidential hopes during the past week in what has amounted to a perfect storm of legal misery. Here is what happened.

Last week, Mrs. Clinton’s five closest advisors The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfitswhen she was Secretary of State, four of whom remain close to her and have significant positions in her presidential campaign, were interrogated by the FBI. These interrogations were voluntary, not under…

View original post 917 more words

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Grazing management: The essence of ranching

 Remember: fertilizer pays. Research has shown one pound of additional calf or yearling gain for every pound of nitrogen fertilizer applied to improved pastures.

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersActually, there is lots and lots of evidence to the contrary–especially with ultra high intensity grazing.

Plus: Range fertilization is the epitome of folly in the West. The soil is usually sufficiently fertile. It has not been leeched of its nutrients by eons of heavy rainfall nor has it been poisoned by energy expensive chemicals. The limiting factor is simply water. — jtl, 419

cattle grazing
Photo: Canada Beef Inc.

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual Cattle are unique: they came to us as creatures capable of grazing; as ruminants with the ability to convert roughage to energy; and, ultimately, energy to protein. Grazing is how ranches create value. Grazing management is maintaining the balance between soil health, plant growth, sunlight, and moisture on rangeland. The amount of effective moisture — moisture available to plants — is highly manageable.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewThis month’s article is a compilation of gems collected from a series of articles about grazing and pasture management; articles written and published by academics, range consultants and those who harvest grass for a living.

Manage for what you want, not what you don’t want. Early season grasses like crested wheat and Kentucky blue become less desirable for cattle once they mature. Subjecting these grasses to early grazing pressure, rather than trying to eliminate them, keeps the species in check so they don’t crowd more palatable grasses that follow.

Combat Shooter's Handbook Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsPlant diversity is beneficial. Variety increases the amount of forage cattle graze while keeping the natural ecosystem in check. In the view of some ranchers: “Even if it’s considered a weed, as long as the cows eat it and it’s not toxic, it can be beneficial.”

Availability and location of water is a huge factor in how land gets split.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)   Grass farmer first, beef producer second. Splitting pastures and managing how they are grazed can nearly double grazing capacity. Delaying turnout on grass until pastures have roughly six to eight inches of growth and encouraging cattle to graze fresh growth rather than trampling down taller, older forage helps extend the grazing season. If in doubt: take half, leave half.

Rotate, let it grow, rotate, let it grow… There is no magic answer to rotational grazing. Rotational grazing is about better forage utilization so spring pastures are not under-grazed and summer pastures overgrazed.

The process of sectioning larger pieces of land into smaller paddocks and adopting rotational grazing eases pressure to promote new forage growth. Healthier stands result.

Delay spring grazing. Early spring grazing affects season-long forage yields unless managed carefully. Grazing native range before the third-leaf stage can reduce carrying capacity up to 50 per cent. Early grazing on improved pastures can reduce carrying capacity by 10 to 30 per cent. Typically, turnout on native range should be delayed until the heights of key forage species are at least four to six inches (end of May, first part of June). While native, warm-season tall grasses can benefit from early season grazing, waiting for warm-season tall-grass species to reach the third-leaf stage, or about 10 inches in plant height, is recommended.

Time and timing. Time and timing of grazing reduces overgrazing; neglecting either affects plant vigour, recruitment of new plants, and ecosystem improvement. Basic ecosystem processes require water, nutrients, sunlight, and a system of biological succession. Improving any one of these elements starts a chain of events that involves them all.

Good grazing is a catalyst for efficiency. Good grazing reduces feed costs, increases grass and forage production, reduces labour and equipment costs, and increases land productivity. Overall, it enables more cows to be kept without adding land. Carrying capacity can be created “cheaper” by using fences and water than by buying land.

Though interactions of production, environment and economics are complex, incorporating practices that include incorporation of ecosystem health in day-to-day management of the ranch work helps everyone. Bottom line: those in the beef industry need to ensure all efforts are positive.

Livestock producers often focus on “productivity per cow” and forget that “revenue per acre” is paramount. The intensive selection for growth hasn’t done much to improve ranch profitability over the last 50 years. In fact, it could be argued that in constant dollars or buying power, profit per acre has decreased.

Remember: fertilizer pays. Research has shown one pound of additional calf or yearling gain for every pound of nitrogen fertilizer applied to improved pastures. Efficiently harvesting extra growth through grazing management is fundamental.

Understanding concepts around overgrazing. While animal numbers can accelerate overgrazing, it’s not always numbers that count. Overgrazing is best defined as the failure to move or rotate animals in harmony with forage growth. Proper grazing management is a matter of moving animals before they have the opportunity to re-graze the lush growth after plants have been browsed. Unfortunately, grazing animals don’t utilize grass and forages equally. By instinct, they eat palatable grasses to the ground, while unpalatable plants are left untouched. In time, the cycle has a deleterious effect on plant diversity, soil quality and moisture utilization.

Evaluate stands of alfalfa and ways of utilizing it in grazing programs. Legumes can play a huge role in maintenance of dairy and beef herds. Alfalfa, the most productive and versatile forage legume grown in Canada, has the highest yield potential and feeding value of all perennial forage legumes. Alfalfa’s value increases as we learn to incorporate it into season-long grazing strategies. Managing the potential risk bloat alfalfa presents is a critical reason it hasn’t been more widely incorporated into spring and summer grazing programs.

Approval of products like Alfasure in 2011 and its availability through veterinary clinics without prescription presents a significant opportunity for cattle producers to recapture the benefits of grazing alfalfa.

Alfasure changed paradigms around bloat prevention on legume pasture. Cattle grazing alfalfa can achieve pasture weight gains exceeding 1,000 pounds (453 kg) per acre (1,120 kg per hectare). Under irrigation, production yields of 1,370 pounds of beef per acre (1,555 kg per hectare) have been reported. Typically, yearlings grazing quality grass gain approximately 1.5 pounds per head per day, while cattle grazing alfalfa (with Alfasure) gain 2.5 pounds per head per day — production levels comparable to those achieved in feedlots. Grazing pure alfalfa stands has the potential to more than double net farm income generated from mixed grass-legume pasture.

FOLLOW FLYOVER PRESS ON FACEBOOK

Check out our WebSite

Check out our e-Store

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualPlanned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual. This is the ideal squeal to A Handbook for Ranch Managers.  Although the ecological principles remain the same, what was originally known as “The Savory Grazing Method” now answers to a multitude of different names: ranching for profit, holistic management, managed grazing, mob grazing, management intensive grazing, etc. Land & Livestock International, Inc. uses “Restoration Grazing” under its “Managing the Ranch as a Business” program.” No mater what you call it, this summary and synopsis will guide you step by step through the process and teach you how to use it as it was originally intended. No more excuses for failing to complete your grazing plans.

Posted in Managed Grazing, Planned Grazing, Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Dave Stamey – If I Had a Horse

A Handbook for Ranch Managers Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View Combat Shooter's Handbook Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View

edited by

Dr Jimmy T (Gunny) LaBaume

Is now available in both PAPERBACK and Kindle

BookCoverImageMurray N. Rothbard was the father of what some call Radical Libertarianism or Anarcho-Capitalism which Hans-Hermann Hoppe described as “Rothbard’s unique contribution to the rediscovery of property and property rights as the common foundation of both economics and political philosophy, and the systematic reconstruction and conceptual integration of modern, marginalist economics and natural-law political philosophy into a unified moral science: libertarianism.”

This book applies the principles of this “unified moral science” to environmental and natural resource management issues.

The book started out life as an assigned reading list for a university level course entitled Environmental and Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View.

As I began to prepare to teach the course, I quickly saw that there was a plethora of textbooks suitable for universal level courses dealing with environmental and natural resource economics. The only problem was that they were all based in mainstream neo-classical (or Keynesian) theory. I could find no single collection of material comprising a comprehensive treatment of environmental and natural resource economics based on Austrian Economic Theory.

However, I was able to find a large number of essays, monographs, papers delivered at professional meetings and published from a multitude of sources. This book is the result. It is composed of a collection of research reports and essays by reputable scientists, economists, and legal experts as well as private property and free market activists.

The book is organized into seven parts: I. Environmentalism: The New State Religion; II. The New State Religion Debunked; III. Introduction to Environmental and Natural Resource Economics; IV. Interventionism: Law and Regulation; V. Pollution and Recycling; VI. Property Rights: Planning, Zoning and Eminent Domain; and VII. Free Market Conservation. It also includes an elaborate Bibliography, References and Recommended Reading section including an extensive Annotated Bibliography of related and works on the subject.

The intellectual level of the individual works ranges from quite scholarly to informed editorial opinion.

FOLLOW LAND & LIVESTOCK INTERNATIONAL ON FACEBOOK

Check out our WebSite

Check out our Online Rancher Supply Store

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Another Rancher Destroyd by the BLM…. Borba vs/BLM.

Animals have “rights” but people don’t. — jtl, 419

A Handbook for Ranch Managers Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View Combat Shooter's Handbook Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)  

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Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualPlanned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual. This is the ideal squeal to A Handbook for Ranch Managers.  Although the ecological principles remain the same, what was originally known as “The Savory Grazing Method” now answers to a multitude of different names: ranching for profit, holistic management, managed grazing, mob grazing, management intensive grazing, etc. Land & Livestock International, Inc. uses “Restoration Grazing” under its “Managing the Ranch as a Business” program.” No mater what you call it, this summary and synopsis will guide you step by step through the process and teach you how to use it as it was originally intended. No more excuses for failing to complete your grazing plans.

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This Week at the Circle

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersWinter 2016 Game Photos  A basic disagreement between Big Wildlife and holistic thinkers like Aldo Leopold is whether multiple species compete with each other or compliment each other. Another is whether predators like wolves, lions, coyotes & bobcats harm…  Read on »

Eyewitness Account of Pronghorn, Bison, Elk, & Mule Deer Sharing Desert Ranges According to invasive species believers, including TPWD, Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manualbison and elk should be removed from our state parks and wildlife management areas because they don’t belong and because they “compete” with, and “harm” desert bighorn sheep… Read on »

   Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View  Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits Combat Shooter's Handbook 

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersA Handbook for Ranch Managers.  In keeping with the “holistic” idea that the land, the livestock, the people and the money should be viewed as a single integrated whole: Part I deals with the management of the natural resources. Part II covers livestock production and Part III deals with the people and the money. Not only would this book make an excellent basic text for a university program in Ranch Management, no professional ranch manager’s reference bookshelf should be without it. It is a comprehensive reference manual for managing the working ranch. The information in the appendices and extensive bibliography alone is worth the price of the book.

You might also be interested in the supplement to this Handbook: Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual.

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