Another Ron Paul Victory

In Blow to Federal Reserve, Arizona Just Legalized Gold and Silver as Currency.

Source: Another Ron Paul Victory

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Open Letter to Secretary Zinke regarding the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks National Monument

In the greater scope of your monument review process, my letter may not materially impact readership, but I live face-to-face with this monument. The designation of the OMDPNM impacts my life every day and I have come to feel helpless in the preservation of my life’s investment and the continuity it represents since before my great grandfather trailed cattle across our ranch on the Butterfield Trail in 1888.

Do you suppose the FedGov gives a rat’s ass about any of that? — jtl, 419

The Honorable Ryan Zinke

Secretary of Interior

Monument Review MS-1530,

U.S. Department of Interior
1849 C. Street, NWWashington, D.C 202240

RE: Open Letter to Secretary Zinke regarding the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks National Monument (OMDPNM) review

Dear Secretary Zinke:

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersIn the greater scope of your monument review process, my letter may not materially impact readership, but I live face-to-face with this monument. The designation of the OMDPNM impacts my life every day and I have come to feel helpless in the preservation of my life’s investment and the continuity it represents since before my great grandfather trailed cattle across our ranch on the Butterfield Trail in 1888.

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual He watered at our headquarters at a spring then known as Neire Springs. It was one of only a few natural waters in the big dry stretch of country from Picacho Peak to Ft. Cummins. Arguably, it was the most dangerous stretch of the trail from St. Louis to San Francisco.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View  We have reason to now believe his partner was Boze Ikard, the enduring character the world now knows as Deets in the made for television series, Lonesome Dove. Both had ridden for Charles Goodnight in Texas. Ikard was with Goodnight and Loving in the horrendously difficult first trips up the Goodnight-Loving Trail while my grandfather came later and trailed JA and PAT cattle north on the Palo Duro- Kansas railhead routes.

Combat Shooter's HandbookTheir partnership was the unheralded but hugely difficult task of driving “mixed” herds (cows, calves, and bulls as opposed to mature steers) with the intention of establishing permanent ranching operations as opposed to driving cattle to markets. In that process, they assumed the responsibility of not just the stewardship of those cattle, but the creation of infrastructure that allowed them to exist. Today, there is diminishing understanding of the implications of that undertaking.

Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute They joined what my friend, Myles Culbertson, refers to as the “economic and cultural phenomena of a grazing society” that remains uninterrupted since the era of settlement following the Spanish exploration. It is a society that provides 99.7% of every drop of water that is available to livestock and wildlife alike in the OMDPNM footprint. It is also a fragile society. Within the agriculture community in Dona Ana County, the county most impacted by The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfitsthe designation, recruitment of next generation stewards is 17%. That means that only 17% of the farming, ranching, and dairy segments has a young steward standing in the wings. We can’t offer assurances or robust opportunities because of the uncertainties emanating from federal land use dominion. Please remember that all this “iconic” monument land is simply reshuffled within a framework of government owned land that already consumes 94.5% of the entire county!

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)Our private land, therefore, is ever dearer in order to create infrastructure that makes our operations more productive and secure. This raises the two points of this letter. The first deals with the proclamation setting forth the creation of the monument and the disposition of private lands landlocked within the footprint. This concern arises from the NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARRACK OBAMA vested authority clause which states that Lands and interests in land within the monument’s boundaries not owned or controlled by the United States shall be reserved as part of the monument upon acquisition of ownership or control by the United States.

It doesn’t take a genius to understand the implication. The United States intends to control our lands. It can be further determined from the maps wherein our private ranch properties are not excluded by boundary demarcations (unlike the upper end imbedded residential developments along the Organ Mountain face).

Certainly, we are subjects of existing rights, but, when the allowances of the Antiquities Act are considered, only two protected objects are allowed. Those are scientific and historic. That doesn’t include “iconic landscapes, ecological diversity, general and widespread southwestern fauna and flora, or prehistoric matters that may or may not be “ripe for discovery” without qualification. Likewise, they are not authorizations to pick winners or losers. You mirrored our fears when you said, “Monuments should never be put in a position to prevent rather than protect.”

There are 90 families directly impacted by this monument that exist only because of the land on which they fill the role of steward. If they wrote you a comment, they would represent three tenths of one percent of the number of public comments you received the first week of the comment period. Like mine, their letters may not “materially impact readership”, but they also live face-to-face with this monument and feel totally exposed and unprotected.

What they represent is historic in every sense of that word, and has been recognized as so by the local conservation district as well as the seven-member Council of Border Conservation Districts.

This, my second point, elevates the requirement of federal law to observe and deal with local governance in land use planning. When you offer your recommendations to President Trump, you must recognize this designation treats the matter of historic in antagonistic juxtaposition to valid local land use planning. Your task of resolution is not just proper and fitting.It is required by law.

I look forward to meeting you and discussing this. My colleagues, this local cadre of a greater organized society, do as well. We take our stewardship very seriously. In this unbroken four century historic relationship, future generations should be elevated into the consideration of purpose of land designations rather than a conditional use.

It is that simple, and it is that important.

Sincerely,

_____________________________
Stephen L. Wilmeth
OMDP Monument Rancher
Stephen L. Wilmeth is a rancher from southern New Mexico. “There is a big storm brewing over the status of these monuments that was under estimated. The size of these designations are simply too monstrous. The outcome is likely going to be greater political tit for tat over which only deeper resentment and distrust will result. We have all been put into a terrible situation.”

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Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualPlanned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual. This is the ideal squeal to A Handbook for Ranch Managers.  Although the ecological principles remain the same, what was originally known as “The Savory Grazing Method” now answers to a multitude of different names: ranching for profit, holistic management, managed grazing, mob grazing, management intensive grazing, etc. Land & Livestock International, Inc. uses “Restoration Grazing” under its “Managing the Ranch as a Business” program.” No mater what you call it, this summary and synopsis will guide you step by step through the process and teach you how to use it as it was originally intended. No more excuses for failing to complete your grazing plans.

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Ending Obama EPA’s ban on Alaska’s Pebble Mine is right for American energy

Solutions are in the pipeline. The president has launched an ambitious new approach to resources and Congress isn’t far behind.
Those of us who have the roots of one tree firmly planted in the Old South and another in the Far West have had a double dose of the Yankee Occupier’s “reconstruction.” Let’s hope that this kind of relief continues to grow.

I remain UN-reconstructedly yours. — jtl, 419

By Ned Mamula and Catrina Rorke via The Hill

Ending Obama EPA's ban on Alaska's Pebble Mine is right for American energy

© Getty ImagesThe Environmental Protection Agency is again drawing the ire of environmentalists, this time by lifting an Obama-era ban on development of Alaska’s Pebble Mine. It’s part of a dramatic pivot driven by the Trump administration, with rule changes, proposals and executive orders all intended to realign U.S. public lands policy with the White House’s development-minded approach.

If the changes are implemented successfully, the administration has the opportunity to create much-needed jobs in the western half of the country. And if the Pebble Mine is any example, it could finally unchain the United States from what has been a dangerous dependency on critical mineral imports.The proposed Pebble Mine in southwestern Alaska would bring to market 6.44 billion metric tons of copper, gold, molybdenum and silver, four commodities in the group known as “critical and strategic minerals.” These minerals are critical for the manufacture of goods as varied as medical devices, agricultural products, and electronics, and contribute to industries that added $2.78 trillion to gross domestic product last year. Critical and strategic minerals get their designation because they’re not just economically vital; they’re also essential to national defense. The Pentagon maintains 37 mineral commodities as part of the Defense National Stockpile.As recently as 1990, the United States was the world’s largest producer of mineral resources. Geologically speaking, we’re rich. The American West hosts one of the largest, most diverse and most unusually concentrated mineral belts in the world, extending from Colorado to the Pacific Ocean. That geological terrain hosts world-class deposits of chromium, copper, fluorine, gold, molybdenum, platinum and uranium, to name just a few.

But quite a different trend has emerged over the last three decades. Earlier this year, the U.S. Geological Survey reported that, of 88 important minerals they track, the United States is more than 25 percent import-dependent for 62 of them. For 20 of those minerals, the United States is 100 percent reliant on imports. Many of those 20 key minerals are absolutely critical to the economy and national defense.

The risks are underscored when one considers just how reliant the country has become on imports specifically from Russia and China. China, by far the world’s largest source of minerals, has already used its rare earth mineral wealth as a diplomatic weapon. As Chinese statesman Deng Xiaoping said in 1992: “The Middle East has its oil, China has rare earth.”

Resources can be powerful economic weapons. Consider the 1973 Arab Oil Embargo, prompted by international support for Israel in the Yom Kippur War. In retaliation, Arab countries cut production and prohibited exports to a number of countries. Oil prices more than quadrupled, consumers and corporations had trouble accessing supplies and the global economy raced toward recession. Only after significant concessions were made by the United States and its allies was the embargo lifted by the oil cartel.

The embargo pushed industry and government agencies to launch ambitious research and resource development programs that developed new technologies and unleashed our current fossil-fuel abundance. We shouldn’t wait for a similar precipitous event involving critical minerals. Quite simply, U.S. minerals policy needs to return to its founding in the “conservation ethic.”

In his memoir, Gifford Pinchot, the founding chief of the U.S. Forest Service, defined conservation as “the wise use of the earth and its resources for the lasting good of men.” In the last few decades, lands policy has instead tipped toward “preservation” — the view that resources have more inherent value than productive value. The tangible results of this shift, in terms of exploring and mining minerals, have been excessively long permitting timelines, land withdrawals and capitulation to environmental opposition. Federal lands management agencies are failing in their obligation to be wise stewards of the public domain.

Solutions are in the pipeline. The president has launched an ambitious new approach to resources and Congress isn’t far behind. Earlier this year, members of the Nevada and Idaho congressional delegations introduced in both chambers the National Strategic and Critical Minerals Production Act, which would charge the Interior and Agriculture departments with more efficiently developing critical and strategic minerals on federal lands. More substantive policy reforms to expand domestic minerals mining and production could and should follow. Informed, data-driven consideration of our mineral resources would allow the United States to better reconcile its economic needs with its devotion to environmental protection.

America is blessed with expansive mineral deposits and a more secure mineral future is within reach. Conscientious policy reforms to cultivate a smaller, less intrusive and more focused government minerals policy can successfully reconcile economic growth with environmental protection, empower the marketplace and shift the United States away from over-reliance on imports of critical and strategic minerals, especially from China and Russia.

Ned Mamula is an adjunct scholar with the Cato Institute; Catrina Rorke (@CRorke) is a senior fellow with the R Street Institute.


The views expressed by contributors are their own and are not the views of The Hill.

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Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualWe are seeking individual ranchers to sponsor/host workshops. The sponsor/host (and spouse or key employee) get the training at his/her ranch for no charge. This is an extra special benefit to the host as his/her land will be used for the “lab” work and hands on demonstrations. This provides a great start in the implementation of his/her program.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewIn return, he/she takes care of the logistics involved in putting on the event. This includes arranging for the venue, booking a block of rooms for lodging, arranging for meals (if any), putting out the advertising, setting and collecting the fees and so forth.

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An Abuse of the Antiquities Act

Grazing in this part of the country has been an economic and cultural phenomenon since the era of settlement that followed Spanish exploration of the region.
A Handbook for Ranch Managers And sadly, thanks to the Cultural Marxists, that culture and heritage is not long for the world. That is unless, of course, we decide to do something about it. And I’m not talking about wasting our time voting.  — jtl, 419
by Myles Culbertson via THE WESTERNER

The Western Conservationist Movement is a consortium of organizations sharing common concerns about the unnecessary removal of large masses federal lands to restricted status under the guise of national monuments or wilderness.In the case of the Organ Mountains–Desert Peaks declaration under the Antiquities Act, a number of critical questions were ignored and otherwise deflected, to be dealt with after the fact.Not unexpectedly, none of these questions were addressed once the half-million acre monument was formalized.

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual Grazing in this part of the country has been an economic and cultural phenomenon since the era of settlement that followed Spanish exploration of the region.Ranchers over the past several decades have enjoyed a cooperative partnership with the Bureau of Land Management that has demonstrably protected and preserved the beauty, diversity and sensitive ecology of these lands.History confirms that, in large transformations of federal lands to “protected status,” like the Sonoran Desert and Escalante Grand Staircase monuments, those partnerships become vulnerable to adverse legal actions that diminish and ultimately remove the collaborative grazing relationships.Regardless of numerous requests to recognize these culturally and ecologically important grazing traditions as monument purposes, no government effort to address the issue was ever initiated.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View  The Rio Grande valley is one of the most productive agricultural areas in the country as well as a very desirable region in which to live, giving rise to numerous communities, large and small, up and down that valley.A desert environment like ours can also be the setting for incredibly large and destructive flash floods, and that kind of floodwater frequently threatens the complex sensitive system of irrigation in the valley and its populated communities.A recent example is the 2006 destruction that occurred in Hatch, NM.Prevention is critically dependent upon access to the upper watershed in order to build large and small structures to spread and slow such flood-waters.Besides protecting the valley, these types of projects preserve and improve the biological diversity of the watershed.This type of mitigation was not sufficiently included among the stated monument purposes, and the safety of lands, property, infrastructure, and people are in question as a result.

Combat Shooter's Handbook Regardless of the vague idea of a buffer zone between the U.S./Mexico border and the vast monument area, no assurance exists that this wholesale removal of land, restricting access by law enforcement and homeland security personnel, will not result in a massive corridor for human trafficking, drug smuggling, and other dangerous criminal movement.The undeniable precedent of ecological destruction, as well as danger to residents, tourists and local citizens is easily found in the nearby Sonoran Desert Monument in Arizona.In that case, the ostensible “monument” protection of a very sensitive ecology is actually contributing to its destruction.Specific language preserving access, road infrastructure, and jurisdictions for federal, state, and county authorities was intentionally excluded from the Organ Mountain Desert Peaks monument’s purposes.As a result, the ecology and people of Dona Ana County have been put at risk.

Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsThe foregoing describes only three of a number of questions that remained intentionally unanswered in this massive removal of federal lands under the guise of monument protection.

The Western Conservationist Movement is not opposed to, and in fact supports, a monument encompassing the Organ Mountains; however, what we have seen is a massive, far-reaching and impactful abuse of the Combat Shooter's Handbook Antiquities Act reflected by the removal of half a million acres of federal lands reaching all the way from the Organ Mountains to Luna County.It is a vast, ill-conceived, ill-advised, unaccountable action that threatens the culture, natural productivity, and ecological balance of the region, as well as the safety and security of its citizens.

 The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) 

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Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View

edited by

Dr Jimmy T (Gunny) LaBaume

Is now available in both PAPERBACK and Kindle

BookCoverImageMurray N. Rothbard was the father of what some call Radical Libertarianism or Anarcho-Capitalism which Hans-Hermann Hoppe described as “Rothbard’s unique contribution to the rediscovery of property and property rights as the common foundation of both economics and political philosophy, and the systematic reconstruction and conceptual integration of modern, marginalist economics and natural-law political philosophy into a unified moral science: libertarianism.”

This book applies the principles of this “unified moral science” to environmental and natural resource management issues.

The book started out life as an assigned reading list for a university level course entitled Environmental and Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View.

As I began to prepare to teach the course, I quickly saw that there was a plethora of textbooks suitable for universal level courses dealing with environmental and natural resource economics. The only problem was that they were all based in mainstream neo-classical (or Keynesian) theory. I could find no single collection of material comprising a comprehensive treatment of environmental and natural resource economics based on Austrian Economic Theory.

However, I was able to find a large number of essays, monographs, papers delivered at professional meetings and published from a multitude of sources. This book is the result. It is composed of a collection of research reports and essays by reputable scientists, economists, and legal experts as well as private property and free market activists.

The book is organized into seven parts: I. Environmentalism: The New State Religion; II. The New State Religion Debunked; III. Introduction to Environmental and Natural Resource Economics; IV. Interventionism: Law and Regulation; V. Pollution and Recycling; VI. Property Rights: Planning, Zoning and Eminent Domain; and VII. Free Market Conservation. It also includes an elaborate Bibliography, References and Recommended Reading section including an extensive Annotated Bibliography of related and works on the subject.

The intellectual level of the individual works ranges from quite scholarly to informed editorial opinion.

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Science Unsettled: Why Trump Should Dump The Paris Climate Deal

We keep hearing the “science is settled,” yet once again data emerge showing that there has been no appreciable warming now for 19 years. Memo to global warming advocates: People are starting to notice.

Whoever it was that coined the phrase “the science is settled” did not know much about science. No true science is ever “settled.” To say that is to imply that mankind knows everything there is to know about God’s Nature.  It ain’t ever gonna happen. — jtl, 419

via Investor’s Business Daily

Climate Change: We keep hearing the “science is settled,” yet once again data emerge showing that there has been no appreciable warming now for 19 years. Memo to global warming advocates: People are starting to notice.

Of course, it is pretty clear from the record that temperatures have risen in the past 150 years or so. But that should hardly be surprising, given that the period lasting into the early 19th century was known as the “Little Ice Age.”

But more recently, alarms were sounded over the rise in 2015 and 2016 of global temperatures, even though the rise was a result of a temporary phenomenon — the “El Nino” effect of warming seawaters in the Pacific that create higher temperatures and weather disruptions around the world.

As Christopher Booker of the Sunday Telegraph in Britain noted this week, after being repeatedly warned about 2016 being “the hottest year on record,” we now have arrived at this: “In recent months global temperatures have plummeted by more than 0.6 degrees: just as happened 17 years ago after a similarly strong El Nino.”

By the way, those temperature readings are courtesy of satellites, which provide the most comprehensive and accurate temperature readings of all. Many of the scariest headlines come from far more limited, and localized, temperature readings, which can be deceptive.

Scare headlines about disappearing arctic ice are similarly being shown as overblown if not outright false. The Danish Meteorological Institute reports that since December Arctic temperatures have pretty much been below -20 degrees Celsius. Arctic ice and the Greenland ice cap are both expanding, not shrinking.

Knowing this, it pays to be skeptical of model-based data — not actual measured ones — that suggest a need to spend massive amounts of money to keep a purely hypothetical threat from taking place. It makes no sense.

We’ve been told that the world will have to spend 2% of GDP, or roughly $1.5 trillion each year, to keep the threat of global warming at bay — even though estimates show that even if everything requested by the Paris Climate Change Accord were done, the effect on global climate would be negligible.

What’s galling is that, thanks to the fracking revolution, the U.S. is already sharply cutting its emissions of CO2. In February, the American Interest noted that “U.S. energy-related CO2 emissions hit a 25-year low the first six months of 2016, continuing the progress that the EPA says we made in 2015.”

So, temperatures and the output of CO2 are both falling? Meanwhile, recent reporting suggests the models on which the supposed global warming “science” is based have turned out to be highly questionable, unable to predict even past warming — something a model is supposed to be able to do.

As we noted recently, since the 1997 Kyoto Accord, U.S. output of greenhouse gases has plummeted 7.3%, despite U.S. GDP growing by 52% during that time. Our greenhouse gas footprint is shrinking, not growing. Meanwhile, nations such as China and India that are boosting their output of greenhouse gases dramatically remain untouched by any of the recent anti-global warming agreements — including the damaging one that Obama agreed to in Paris in late 2015, but never submitted to the Senate for approval.

Which raises a big question. The Trump administration right now is under intense pressure both here and abroad to remain in Obama’s fraudulent Paris climate deal, which, as far as we can tell, is intentionally designed to destroy the U.S. economy and lower Americans’ standard of living.

Given the bad science and the enormous costs on which the Paris deal is based, why continue to give it any credence at all?

President Trump should do himself and the U.S. a favor and withdraw from the Paris deal. As the renewed decline in temperatures shows, the only real threat Americans face is an unholy alliance between global bureaucrats and financially corrupted scientists eager for massive amounts of new spending so that they can stay employed. Time to put them all out of business.

RELATED:

If Global Warming Is Real, Why Do Government Scientists Have To Keep Cheating?

Five Reasons Why Ridicule Is The Proper Response To Global Warming Alarmists

With Trump, The U.S. Can Escape The Paris Climate Deal Trap

Is Global Warming Science Just A Fraud?

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Dripping Springs
Mule Creek, Grant County, New Mexico

The Dripping Springs Ranch is a highly improved working cattle ranch in a very desirable part of southwest New Mexico. Access to the Ranch from State Route 78 is excellent, and it is an easy drive to either Silver City, N. or Safford, Az. 232 deeded acres, 13,000 USFS acres, 150 AU. $2,500,000

Walking L Ranch
Wickenburg, Yavapai County

The Walking L Ranch’s 52+ square miles adjoin Wickenburg from the Hassayamapa River into the Wickenburg Mountains. The ranch originally consisted of the 10X Ranch on the south end and the Rincon Ranch on the north end.  The old Rincon Dude Ranch was added to the ranch’s Headquarters by the current owner. The ranch’s land tenure consists of deeded land, State and BLM Grazing Leases.  Topography is rolling to steep with elevation’s ranging from 2,100’ along the river to over 2,700’ on San Domingo Peak.  The ranch borders US 60 on the south side of Wickenburg.  The ranch’s deeded land is in seven non-contiguous parcels throughout the ranch.  The headquarters consists of 110.88 deeded acres on Rincon Road and the Hassayampa River with approximately 30 acres irrigated.  Another headquarters for the 10X is on the state lease. $5,000,000

Dos S Inholding
Fountain Hills, Maricopa County

The Dos S is a 22.78 acre private inholding surrounded by Tonto National Forest on Sycamore Creek.  It is located just off the Beeline Highway behind a locked gate 20 miles from the Shea Boulevard & Highway 87 intersection at Fountain Hills.  Payson is 40 miles to the north. $1,025,100

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Love the horses but let them starve

…worldwide, 4.7 million horses are slaughtered each year (not all from United States) and exported to countries where horse meat is a gourmet food and brings more than twice as much money as beef.

Even here in the uSSA where we don’t eat much horse meat, the solution is very simple. Make these horses private property and repeal the ban on slaughter. Problem solved. — jtl, 419

by Merilee Dannemann, via Current-Argus

A Handbook for Ranch Managers Of all the demonstrations of Americans’ political hypocrisy, what we’ve done about the slaughter of horses is right up there.

We can thank our governor for a recent example, though she is hardly alone.

Like other public figures, the governor shed crocodile tears a few years ago during the controversy over the possible opening of a horse slaughterhouse in Roswell. That controversy helped spark a change in federal policy that effectively banned horse slaughter in the United States.

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual This year, she pocket vetoed a simple bill that would have saved a few horses. A pocket veto means she simply ignored the bill until the deadline passed.

The bill, HB 390, said when the state livestock board has custody of a stray horse, licensed rescue organizations should get a chance to buy the horse at a modest fee before the horse is offered at auction. This would allow the rescue to get the horse at a low price rather than having to bid against other unknown buyers, possibly including “killer buyers” who would take the horse to Mexico and sell it for slaughter. The bill passed both houses handily.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewSometimes, as explained by Debbie Coburn of Four Corners Equine Rescue, the killer buyer wins the bid; to save the horse, the rescue buys it from the killer buyer at a much higher price. The rescues all operate on a shoestring with limited resources, so this limits their ability to save more horses.

Combat Shooter's Handbook Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsA legislative analysis said the impact of the bill might be reduced income to the livestock board, since auctions generate money to the board.

However, horses saved by rescues are a tiny drop in the bucket compared to the massive numbers of homeless underfed horses.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)New Mexico has nine equine rescues, all private except a small one for inmates at the Springer Correctional Center. While their work is admirable, collectively they save only a few hundred horses each year.

Meanwhile, in Mexico, slaughter and the sale of horse meat is a thriving business. Several estimates agree that about 120,000 U.S. horses a year are slaughtered.

Travel writer Tara A. Spears writes from Mexico that worldwide, 4.7 million horses are slaughtered each year (not all from United States) and exported to countries where horse meat is a gourmet food and brings more than twice as much money as beef. With a bitter tone, she writes, “It’s a classic case of if you don’t want to get your hands dirty, hire the Mexicans to do it.”

Readers may remember that during the controversy over the Roswell slaughterhouse, Gov. Bill Richardson and movie star Robert Redford teamed up to support outlawing horse slaughter in the United States. I checked recently with the staffs of Richardson and Redford to find out what they have done since then to promote the welfare of wild and abandoned horses. I got polite replies but no answers. In other words, nothing.

Meanwhile, wild horses continue to sicken and die of hunger and thirst while overgrazing and damaging the land. A 2013 news report by KOAT estimated between 60,000 and 75,000 feral horses just on the Navajo nation. When a roundup up was done in 2013, many of the horses were visibly sick and underfed.

I have found no information to indicate that any of that has changed. Coburn agrees: It hasn’t.

If you’d like to do a little something for horses, you can donate to a rescue. And if you have a refund on next year’s state income taxes you can contribute a portion of it to the state’s Horse Shelter Rescue Fund. The money goes through the livestock board to the licensed horse shelters. You check a box on the PIT D form. It’s one of 13 options for donating a portion of your tax refund. Last year this fund provided about $30,000 to the rescues — helpful but paltry.

Contact Merilee Dannemann through www.triplespacedagain.com.

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Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualPlanned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual. This is the ideal squeal to A Handbook for Ranch Managers.  Although the ecological principles remain the same, what was originally known as “The Savory Grazing Method” now answers to a multitude of different names: ranching for profit, holistic management, managed grazing, mob grazing, management intensive grazing, etc. Land & Livestock International, Inc. uses “Restoration Grazing” under its “Managing the Ranch as a Business” program.” No mater what you call it, this summary and synopsis will guide you step by step through the process and teach you how to use it as it was originally intended. No more excuses for failing to complete your grazing plans.

Posted in Uncategorized, Wild Horses | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

Hated by Our Enemy, the Deep State

Source: Hated by Our Enemy, the Deep State

It is so damned silly it is down right sickening. — jtl, 419

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Judge rejects Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy’s attempt to jump-start trial

Bundy Ranch trial: Carol Bundy speaks

Carol Bundy, in an interview with The Republic, said her husband, sons and others are really being tried for making federal authorities look bad and forcing them to back down in the face of a citizen uprising.

An investigation could derail one of the most high-profile land-use trials in modern Western history. Wochit

Rancher: ‘We did what we had to do’

Cliven Bundy refuses to pay fees for cattle grazing on public land for 20 years.

Retrial of 4 earlier defendants must come first, judge rules.

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersNevada rancher Cliven Bundy will get his day in court later rather than sooner. And he will remain in custody while he waits.A federal judge this week rejected Bundy’s attempt to jump-start his trial on conspiracy and weapons charges for taking up arms against federal agents in the 2014 standoff near his ranch.

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual  Nevada Judge Gloria Navarro said Bundy, 71, will have to wait to go to trial until after the retrial of four co-defendants has ended. That case is scheduled to begin June 26 and could take months.

Navarro’s ruling is the first clear indication that prosecutors are unwilling to let the four go after a jury deadlocked on all charges against them last month.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View“The government’s response indicated its intent to retry the … defendants following the April 2017 mistrial,” Navarro wrote.

The Nevada U.S. Attorney’s Office on Tuesday declined comment on “whether or not a decision has been made” to retry the four defendants. But also on Tuesday, prosecutors challenged a motion for acquittal made by one of the defendants based on the jury’s inability to to reach a verdict.

Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits Combat Shooter's Handbook  Prosecutors said the court should deny Oklahoma defendant Richard Lovelien’s move for acquittal.

“His reliance on the fact that the jury did not vote unanimously to convict him is inapt … and fails to show that a rational jury could not convict,” prosecutors wrote in their motion.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)Jurors on April 24 convicted two defendants on multiple counts but could not reach a unanimous verdict against Lovelien and three others.

The six men were described by prosecutors as the least culpable of 17 defendants charged with conspiracy, extortion, assault and obstruction for helping Bundy fend off a government roundup of his cattle in what became known as the Battle of Bunkerville.

Their trial was the first of three separate trials in the Bundy Ranch case and was supposed to serve as a strategic springboard for prosecutors.

Cliven Bundy, his sons Ammon and Ryan Bundy and two others whom prosecutors said led the standoff are scheduled to be tried second.

‘Rights have already been violated’

Cliven Bundy has repeatedly claimed that the government has denied him a right to a speedy trial. In a motion this month, he asked to be tried alongside the four defendants in the June 26 retrial.

“Mr. Bundy’s speedy trial rights have already been violated by the numerous delays in this case caused by the court and caused by the United States,” Las Vegas lawyer Bret Whipple said in his motion.

Whipple indicated Bundy has remained incarcerated since his arrest in February 2016.

“Mr. Bundy cannot be harmed by further delay,” Whipple said. “The United States cannot detain these defendants indefinitely while conducting indefinite and repeated retrials.”

Whipple argued the court should dismiss the charges against the four defendants rather than retry them, saying the evidence is “weak and unlikely to convince any jury, no matter how many bites at the apple the United States is awarded.”

Navarro, citing court rules that require a retrial within 70 days of a mistrial, disagreed. She scheduled the start of the second trial 30 days after the end of the retrial.

Land-use battles in Nevada, Oregon

The Bundy Ranch standoff is one of the most high-profile land-use cases in modern Western history, pitting cattle ranchers, anti-government protesters and militia members against the U.S. Bureau of Land Management.

For decades, the BLM repeatedly ordered Bundy to remove his cattle from federal lands and in 2014 obtained a court order to seize his cattle as payment for more than $1 million in unpaid grazing fees.

The Bundy family issued a social-media battle cry. Hundreds of supporters from every state in the union, including members of several militia groups, converged on his ranch about 70 miles north of Las Vegas.

The BLM abandoned the roundup because agents feared they were going to die, federal prosecutors told jurors. They said law-enforcement officers were surrounded and outgunned in a dusty arroyo beneath Interstate 15 where they had penned the cattle.

Local, state and federal law-enforcement officers testified they were afraid they would be shot or be drawn into a bloody shooting war with unarmed men, women and children in the crossfire.

The standoff was hailed as a victory by militia members. Ammon and Ryan Bundy cited their success at Bundy Ranch in their run-up to the siege of an Oregon wildlife refuge in 2016, also in protest of BLM policies.

An Oregon federal jury acquitted Ammon, Ryan and five others in October. A second federal jury in Oregon delivered a split verdict against four others in March, acquitting two men on conspiracy charges and convicting two others.

No arrests were made in the Bundy Ranch case until after the Oregon siege ended.

Government’s conspiracy claims dismissed

The standoff was represented for many by an iconic photograph of a figure lying prone on an overpass and sighting a long rifle at BLM agents in the wash below. The image galvanized the public and brought international awareness to the feud over public lands and the potential consequences of such a dispute.

Bundy Ranch standoff

But jurors in the first trial couldn’t agree on whether the man in that picture, Eric Parker of Idaho, brandished a weapon, assaulted officers or even posed a threat to them.

Jurors in the first trial began deliberating April 13 after two months of testimony involving 35 prosecution and four defense witnesses.

Jurors found Gregory Burleson of Arizona guilty on eight charges, including threatening and assaulting a federal officer, obstruction, interstate travel in aid of extortion and brandishing a weapon. Burleson told a video crew after the standoff that he had gone to the Bundy Ranch to kill federal agents. The video crew was made up of undercover FBI agents.

Jurors found Todd Engel of Idaho guilty of obstruction and interstate travel in aid of extortion.

Burleson and Engel will not be retried on any other charges on which the jury deadlocked.

Jurors told lawyers after the trial they never came close to convicting the four other defendants, voting 10-2 in favor of acquitting Lovelien and Steven Stewart, of Idaho, and splitting on verdicts against Eric Parker and O. Scott Drexler, also of Idaho.

Moreover, jurors did not find any of the six defendants guilty on the two main conspiracy charges that made up the core of the government’s case.

Defendants denied they conspired to help Bundy and told jurors the case had nothing to do with cattle. They said they came to protect the public from overzealous and aggressive law-enforcement officers. Defendants said they were moved to join Bundy after seeing internet images of officers throwing an elderly woman to the ground, loosing dogs on one of Bundy’s sons and shocking protesters with stun guns.

Defendants attempted to cast the case as a constitutional issue and they were exercising their First Amendment right to assemble and Second Amendment right to bear arms.

Federal prosecutors argued defendants joined a conspiracy when they knowingly agreed to help Bundy resist federal agents in the roundup of the cattle. Prosecutors said the Constitution does not give anyone the right to ignore law-enforcement officers and threaten them with a gun.

1st trial, Bundy Ranch defendants

Gregory Burleson of Arizona: Guilty on eight counts.

Todd Engel of Idaho: Guilty on two counts.

Richard Lovelien of Oklahoma: Jury deadlocked.

O. Scott Drexler of Idaho: Jury deadlocked.

Eric Parker of Idaho: Jury deadlocked.

Steven Stewart of Idaho: Jury deadlocked.

READ MORE:

Judge declares mistrial in Bundy Ranch case

Carol Bundy awaits her husband’s fate

In Bundy Ranch trial, jury’s decision hinges on questions of cows and conspiracy

Prosecutors: Bundy Ranch dissidents were criminals, not protesters

Agents told to stand down the day before major confrontation with protesters

First of three trials set to begin in Bundy Ranch standoff

BLM misconduct probe may derail Bundy Ranch standoff trial

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A Handbook for Ranch ManagersA Handbook for Ranch Managers.  In keeping with the “holistic” idea that the land, the livestock, the people and the money should be viewed as a single integrated whole: Part I deals with the management of the natural resources. Part II covers livestock production and Part III deals with the people and the money. Not only would this book make an excellent basic text for a university program in Ranch Management, no professional ranch manager’s reference bookshelf should be without it. It is a comprehensive reference manual for managing the working ranch. The information in the appendices and extensive bibliography alone is worth the price of the book.

You might also be interested in the supplement to this Handbook: Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual.

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Musings on how much cattle eat and drink

Charlie Gracey looks at grain and water usage in cattle

A full 1/3 of the earth’s surface land area is classified as arid or semi-arid. A workable definition of “rage land” is land for which the highest and best economic use is the grazing of domestic animals. Rangelands are grazed by default. They are either to high, dry, cold, hot, rocky, isolated etc to be good for anything else.
With respect to the grain consumption argument and feeding a hungry world: 2/3 of the earth’s population is either undernourished (not enough food) or malnourished (sufficient quantity but poor quality). Malnourishment is the most common problem and the most deficient nutrient is protein. 
Feed grains have protein but it is generally of poor quality in that it is are always short of at least one of the essential amino acids. Feeders transform poor quality protein into high quality protein. — jtl, 419
cattle feeding

Photo: Thinkstock

Conventional wisdom holds that beef cattle are wasteful users of grain and in direct competition with humans for finite supplies of food grains and water. Thus the large acreages devoted to feed grains might better be deployed in the production of crops directly consumable by humans.

This observation may appear logical on the surface but, as with so many easy assumptions, it requires closer examination. Recently food scientist Sylvain Charlebois of Dalhousie University commented that cattle require “more than 10 pounds of feed and eight gallons of water to produce one pound of edible beef.” The inference most readers would draw from his comment would be that this placed the beef animal in direct competition with humans for a supposedly limited supply of food grains and water.

The debate about the role of beef in our diet should begin with the facts.

So I would offer a more realistic picture of how the bovine, with its marvellous ruminant digestive system, greatly increases and enhances the human food supply by converting plants indigestible by humans into high-quality protein foods from land entirely unsuitable for any purpose other than grazing.

Grain consumption

Let us begin with some basic “factual” information on grain consumption by beef cattle.

The general public often doesn’t realize that the cow herself spends her entire life eating grass or stored forage in winter, although she may receive small amounts of grain as a growing heifer. Her calf is weaned at about 40 per cent of its mature weight on a diet of mother’s milk and grazing. Whether they enter the feedlot as weaned calves, yearling or short keeps, it is fair to say an “average” animal goes on feed at about 55 per cent of its final mature weight having consumed mainly pastures, stored hay and silages, and little or no grain.

In a feedlot its ration consists of a mixture of forages or silages and a grain ration consisting of corn or barley with a small amount of protein supplement. Based on Trends data from Canfax, I calculate cattle in the feedlot consume, on average, 7.2 pounds of grain per pound of live weight gain.

If this grain is applied to the final weight of the animal, as it should be, grain consumption works out to 3.3 pounds of grain per pound of final live weight.

This ratio of usage is expressed in terms of live weight and must next be converted to actual boneless beef. An average beef carcass weighs 60 per cent of the live animal weight but the amount of boneless beef in a carcass averages 42.6 per cent of the live animal weight.

The rest is not wasted, tighten your belt or look at your shoes… I’ll leave it there. So, if it took 3.3 pounds of grain to produce one pound of live weight gain, that converts to 7.7 pounds to produce one pound of boneless beef.

Even though this is well below the “more than 10 pounds” commonly mentioned, it’s not the whole story. Annually 16 per cent of the total beef supply is produced from culled cows and bulls that consume negligible amounts of grain, aside from that consumed by dairy cows to support milk production. Therefore our figure of 7.7 pounds applies to only 84 per cent of the boneless beef when spread over total annual production, so the correct figure for grain usage by the beef sector is about 6.5 pounds of grain to produce one pound of boneless retail beef. That indeed is a far lower ratio than is commonly used to describe grain consumption in beef production.

Water usage

What about the allegedly high water use in beef production? Drinking water requirements for cattle vary from a low of about 20 to a high of 65 litres per day depending on the type of cattle and the temperature. Recognizing this variability, a generous overall average daily consumption of 45 litres per day for a steer or a heifer means that at an average slaughter age of 18 months the animal has consumed 25,000 litres of water. The mother cow, meanwhile, would have consumed an additional 18,000 litres, which I will round up to 20,000 litres to accommodate the sire. Recall that the sire is sire to approximately 20 offspring per year so his water consumption can be spread over that number of offspring.

So the water requirements to produce a finished steer or heifer totals roughly 45,000 litres. The output is a steer or heifer carcass weighing approximately 380 kg. (I am ignoring the fact that the culled cow and bull also contribute to the beef supply). So that means that 45,000 litres of water were consumed in the production of a 380-kg carcass. That works out to about 118 litres of water per kg of carcass weight or 162 litres per kg of boneless beef.

So it is apparent the claim that eight gallons of water is needed to produce one pound of beef (equates to 80 litres per kg of edible beef) is a considerable underestimation. Probably the lower estimate of 80 litres referred only to water consumption in the feedlot and did not include the water consumed by the animal before it arrived in feedlot or the water consumed by the dam and sire.

But what does this mean? Certainly a large volume of water is used in beef production and, as I have shown, in almost exactly double the amount claimed. But so what? Water, especially water used in agriculture is the ultimate renewable resource and every drop of it is returned to nature to be used again and again. All of the water used to produce that pound of beef, except the moisture content of the beef itself, was back in nature before the animal was marketed. Not one drop was destroyed or wasted. Water usage in beef production becomes an issue only where it is scarce and is needed for other more urgent purposes and that is not a problem in any of the beef-producing regions of Canada.

With the math explained we can move on to the main question. Does the production of feed grain for livestock compete with food grain production in Canada?

The approximate total annual grain and oilseed production in Canada presently is 75 million tonnes. Coarse grains production, which includes feed grains, contributes roughly one-third of that supply. About half of the coarse grain supply is used for industrial purposes, such as malting, and the other half, about 14 million tonnes, is used as feed grains for cattle, hogs, poultry and all the minor livestock species. Currently, the prices of all grains are somewhat depressed and would be even lower were it not for the demand for feed grain exerted by the livestock sector. In addition to consuming feed grains, livestock are the only outlet for the significant but variable quantities of weather-damaged food grains. Without the livestock industry these off-grade food grains would be wasted.

So if one looks at the situation in a balanced way, one can see that by utilizing forage crops, pastures and a modest amount of feed grain, beef cattle provide high-quality, protein dense beef to augment the human food supply. It is true that they consume quantities of feed grains during the feedlot stage but much less than is commonly supposed. As well, they make beneficial use of lower-quality or spoiled food grains and other crop residues that have no other use or value.

It is possible to finish cattle solely on forages but it takes longer, and would take up much of the land currently devoted to feed grain production, with little if any reduction in cost. The grain portion makes up only about 23 per cent of total cost of production in the feedlot.

So should beef production be reduced in an effort to increase the global food supply? Far from improving either the quantity or the nutritional quality of the human food supply, this would result in a lower supply of high-quality protein and a sharp reduction in the total supply of human food.

To understand this apparently illogical observation one has only to recognize that vast areas of land on every continent are unsuited to the intensive cultivation necessary to produce food grains, fruit and vegetables. Even better farming land benefits from crop rotations with forages and applications of livestock manure to improve soil tilth and fertility. So, to reduce or eliminate beef production would mean that the large acreages of land that are suitable only for grazing could no longer make any contribution to the human food supply. Of the 160 million acres of agricultural land in Canada, 50 million acres are described as pasture land, meaning tame and natural pasture land. An additional 17 million acres are devoted to tame hay.

It might be prudent to recall the devastation visited upon vast areas in Canada and the United States during the Dirty Thirties when millions of acres of fragile soil were put to the plow in response to temporarily high wheat prices. The lesson learned then that some land should remain in grass should not be so quickly forgotten. Humanity has centuries of experience with balancing livestock and crop production and only very recent and localized experience with agriculture without livestock.

Charlie Gracey is a beef industry analyst living in Ontario. More detail on this topic is available on his website at www.charlesgracey.net.

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersLand & Livestock International, Inc is offering a “Free” week-long ranch manageme nt-planned grazing seminar-workshop.

What follows is a business model we have been following that has worked very well for us and for our clientele.

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualWe are seeking individual ranchers to sponsor/host workshops. The sponsor/host (and spouse or key employee) get the training at his/her ranch for no charge. This is an extra special benefit to the host as his/her land will be used for the “lab” work and hands on demonstrations. This provides a great start in the implementation of his/her program.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewIn return, he/she takes care of the logistics involved in putting on the event. This includes arranging for the venue, booking a block of rooms for lodging, arranging for meals (if any), putting out the advertising, setting and collecting the fees and so forth.

We are then responsible for putting on the workshop.

During the interim we will each keep track of our out of pocket costs (from our end, that will be mostly travel and lodging). Then, when it is all over, we both are reimbursed our out of pocket costs and split any funds remaining 50:50.

If this sounds like something you might be interested in, click here and let us know. If the link won’t work for you, copy and paste info@landandlivestockinternational.com into your browser.

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How an Undercover FBI Agent Ended Up in Jail After Pretending to Be a Journalist

 For nearly a year, as a part of the FBI’s investigation of the armed standoff between a Nevada rancher named Cliven Bundy and Bureau of Land Management agents in 2014, Johnson pretended to be a documentary filmmaker. At one point, he assured Bundy’s suspicious son Ryan, “I want a truthful documentary.” The more than 100 hours of video and audio recordings that Johnson and his team produced while posing as journalists are being used as evidence in criminal trials against Bundy and his supporters.

A Handbook for Ranch Managers It mystifies me as to how or why any judge would admit such ill-gotten recordings as “evidence?” On second thought, it really is no mystery. The judicial system is just as crooked as the other two “checks and balances” which do not check or balance much of anything. Actually, that is understandable as they all “ride for the same brand” (as we say out here in the West). — jtl, 419

by via The Intercept

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual Word traveled fast in tiny Glendale, Colorado, when an undercover FBI agent identifying himself as Charles Johnson began knocking on doors and asking questions.For nearly a year, as a part of the FBI’s investigation of the armed standoff between a Nevada rancher named Cliven Bundy and Bureau of Land Management agents in 2014, Johnson pretended to be a documentary filmmaker. At one point, he assured Bundy’s suspicious son Ryan, “I want a truthful documentary.” The more than 100 hours of video and audio recordings that Johnson and his team produced while posing as journalists are being used as evidence in criminal trials against Bundy and his supporters. While Johnson was finished with the fake documentary production by the time he arrived in Colorado, he wasn’t done with pretending to be a member of the news media.

Combat Shooter's Handbook It was February 2016, just a couple of weeks after members of the Bundy family and their supporters were arrested following the standoff at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. At the time, Glendale’s civic life was dominated by debate over a $175 million development proposal, called Glendale 180, to create a new nightlife and entertainment district. Glendale Mayor Mike Dunafon has led the campaign to remake the city. An eccentric politician who lives in a home that looks like a castle — it has its own website — Dunafon ran as an independent for Colorado governor in 2014. Wyclef Jean even produced his official campaign song.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewBut Dunafon’s plans for remaking Glendale have been stalled by a local businessman named Mohammad Ali Kheirkhahi, who runs a Persian rug store on land he owns that would be a centerpiece of Glendale 180. Glendale wanted to purchase the land for the entertainment district, but Kheirkhahi had proposed developing a high-rise condominium tower on the site. The city’s tiny newspaper, the Glendale Cherry Creek Chronicle, opposed the condo development proposal, referring to it as the “Tehranian Death Star.” The newspaper quoted several citizens in its pages expressing opposition to Kheirkhani’s residential development. For reasons that remain obscure, Johnson started door-stopping people who were quoted in the newspaper, according to police records obtained by The Intercept.

Combat Shooter's Handbook On February 20, 2016, Johnson showed up at the apartment of Sherry Frame, the Glendale city clerk. Johnson didn’t identify himself as an FBI agent. Instead, he said he was an “investigative consultant” who was hired to look into an ethics complaint. As part of that inquiry, Johnson said he needed to talk to Frame.

Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute Feeling threatened by the unannounced visit to her home, Frame called police. Detectives soon discovered that Johnson had also stopped by the homes of two people who worked at Shotgun Willie’s, a local strip club owned by Mayor Dunafon’s wife. A police officer called Johnson’s number and left a message. Johnson returned the call and left another message. Nothing more happened, until the undercover FBI agent returned to town on March 15, 2016, and contacted Douglas Stiff, a disc jockey at Shotgun Willie’s. Stiff agreed to meet with Johnson at a local restaurant, and then he too called the Glendale police.

In this Feb. 10, 2016 photo, a large roadside sign marks the entrance of longtime strip club Shotgun Willie's, and Smoking Gun Apothecary, the new marijuana dispensary, in Glendale, Colo.   Smokin Gun Apothecary is on a site formerly occupied by the Denver area’s best known strip club, Shotgun Willie’s. The strip club hasn’t gone away, it’s moved just across the parking lot. Both businesses have the same owner, who envisions pot shoppers getting discounted drinks at the strip club and is outfitting the roof of the pot shop for a future lounge in case Colorado changes its law banning on-site marijuana consumption.(AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

A roadside sign marks the entrance of the Shotgun Willie’s strip club and Smoking Gun Apothecary, the new marijuana dispensary, in Glendale, Colo., on Feb. 10, 2016.

Photo: Brennan Linsley/AP

The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsDetective Shaun Farley, suspecting that Johnson was working as a private investigator without a state license, suggested setting up a sting. The case became a game of spy versus spy, an undercover cop trying to catch an undercover FBI agent.

According to audio obtained by The Intercept, on the drive to the restaurant, Farley and Stiff worked on their cover story. “Let’s just say we know each other from CU-Denver,” Farley said.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  “CU-Denver?” Stiff said. “All right, cool.”

“Just say we had some class together and been friends ever since, for fucking business degrees,” Farley added. “So we share common interest in business degrees, chicks with titties, and music, because you’re a DJ, right?”

“Yep,” Stiff said.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2)  Farley slipped the recording device under his clothing. “I can’t just walk in and set it on the table. Be like, ‘What’s up, dude? Here’s my recorder. Say some stupid shit.’”

Stiff laughed. Then they walked into the restaurant and greeted Johnson, who explained that he was investigating the proposed condo project and community opposition to it. As part of that work, he said he was contacting people who, like Stiff, had been quoted in the local newspaper as opposing the project. Stiff told Johnson that he didn’t like being tracked down and having a stranger show up at his home.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) “I didn’t track you down,” Johnson said.

“You came to my front door,” Stiff replied.

“But I didn’t track you down. The person I work for —”

“Who is?” Stiff interrupted.

“She’s a writer,” Johnson answered.

“Who is?” Stiff asked again.

Johnson refused to answer. He explained that he had been hired by a journalist to investigate claims that were made in the local newspaper.

After nearly an hour of talking, with Johnson repeatedly refusing to disclose who had hired him, Farley piped up: “It still seems like you need a license to do this kind of stuff.”

Johnson demurred, saying he was not acting as a private investigator. The undercover cop and the strip club DJ then walked back to the car.

“How often do you have to waste your time like this?” Stiff asked. “Probably a lot.”

“No, it’s not a waste of time,” Farley answered. “He’s about to get pulled over and get arrested.”

“Badass,” Stiff said, excited. “What crime did he commit?”

Farley explained that in Colorado, as of July 2015, anyone doing contract investigations work needed to be licensed as a private investigator in the state.

“Holy shit!” Stiff said.

Another uniformed Glendale police officer then pulled over Johnson, and they agreed to talk at a nearby Starbucks. After interviewing Johnson, the officer let him go, believing that he needed to review the law concerning private investigators before he felt justified in making an arrest. Glendale police officers then reviewed the law, contacted state regulators, and concluded that Johnson was indeed violating state law. They knew from running his plate that he had a rental car that was due back early the next morning. As Johnson dropped off his car, the police approached him. “So I am being placed under arrest?” the undercover agent said.

When he was arrested, Johnson was carrying three different state identification cards, from Tennessee, Hawaii, and Florida, as well as expensive camera equipment. He also had a business card identifying himself as an “investigative consultant” and listing the same Nashville, Tenn., address and phone numbers as Longbow Productions, the fake documentary company the FBI set up to film the Bundys and their supporters. Glendale police booked Johnson and escorted him to an interrogation room, where a camera recorded their conversation. Dressed in blue jeans and a green parka, Johnson maintained his innocence, pointing out that there was an exemption in Colorado law for journalists and that a journalist had hired him to ask questions in Glendale.

“If it was a journalist, what journalist did hire you?” Farley asked.

Johnson shook his head. “And I’m not getting into that because I’m not — because what happened to me, I’m not saying anything about anybody else,” he answered.

The detective followed up: “How did this person reach out to you? How did they even know to contact you?”

“I didn’t know them. From a friend, from a friend who knows what I do,” Johnson said.

None of it added up to Glendale police. So they charged Johnson with unauthorized practice of private investigations and issued a summons to appear in court. Local prosecutors dropped the charges after receiving a letter from the FBI asking them not to prosecute.

It’s unclear what the goal of Johnson’s Glendale undercover operation was or why the FBI’s Denver office decided to use a journalistic cover. “We are not able to comment on the questions you have posed,” said Special Agent Amy Sanders, a spokesperson for the FBI’s Denver office.

In June 2016, four months after this incident, the FBI adopted an interim policy that requires undercover operations involving the impersonation of news media to be approved by the deputy director of the FBI in consultation with the deputy attorney general. As FBI director, James Comey defended the practice of impersonating journalists in criminal investigations but described it as “rare.”

Johnson testified in March in the jury trial of six defendants who had supported the Bundys during the 2014 standoff with federal agents. The trial ended in convictions against two defendants and a hung jury for the other four. Johnson is also expected to testify in the trial of Cliven Bundy and his sons, which is scheduled to begin June 26. The trial may include as evidence video that Johnson produced while impersonating a documentary filmmaker.

The FBI did not respond to questions about Johnson’s arrest in Colorado, including whether it was disclosed to the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Nevada.

Bret Whipple, the lawyer representing Cliven Bundy, had been unaware of Johnson’s arrest in Colorado. “I think it’s absolutely material that could impeach the witness and should have been turned over to us,” Whipple said. “He was breaking local law while acting surreptitiously.”

Top photo: This screen grab made from video released by the Glendale Police shows Charles Johnson during an interrogation.

 

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Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View

edited by

Dr Jimmy T (Gunny) LaBaume

Is now available in both PAPERBACK and Kindle

BookCoverImageMurray N. Rothbard was the father of what some call Radical Libertarianism or Anarcho-Capitalism which Hans-Hermann Hoppe described as “Rothbard’s unique contribution to the rediscovery of property and property rights as the common foundation of both economics and political philosophy, and the systematic reconstruction and conceptual integration of modern, marginalist economics and natural-law political philosophy into a unified moral science: libertarianism.”

This book applies the principles of this “unified moral science” to environmental and natural resource management issues.

The book started out life as an assigned reading list for a university level course entitled Environmental and Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View.

As I began to prepare to teach the course, I quickly saw that there was a plethora of textbooks suitable for universal level courses dealing with environmental and natural resource economics. The only problem was that they were all based in mainstream neo-classical (or Keynesian) theory. I could find no single collection of material comprising a comprehensive treatment of environmental and natural resource economics based on Austrian Economic Theory.

However, I was able to find a large number of essays, monographs, papers delivered at professional meetings and published from a multitude of sources. This book is the result. It is composed of a collection of research reports and essays by reputable scientists, economists, and legal experts as well as private property and free market activists.

The book is organized into seven parts: I. Environmentalism: The New State Religion; II. The New State Religion Debunked; III. Introduction to Environmental and Natural Resource Economics; IV. Interventionism: Law and Regulation; V. Pollution and Recycling; VI. Property Rights: Planning, Zoning and Eminent Domain; and VII. Free Market Conservation. It also includes an elaborate Bibliography, References and Recommended Reading section including an extensive Annotated Bibliography of related and works on the subject.

The intellectual level of the individual works ranges from quite scholarly to informed editorial opinion.

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