Before you buy or build a fence

Recently, a grand daughter took in a “rescue” horse–5 year old stallion (then, but not now). I’ll spare you the details but suffice it to say, as is generally par for the course in such situations, we ended up with the horse. 

I wanted to isolate him for a while and train him to electric fence. So I put a piece of 1 1/2 inch poly tape across the center of the round pen, put a chip of alfalfa on one side and him on the other. 

He started out by sticking his nose under the tape to go after the hay. He got a little zap through the mane which caused him to pull his head back a little. But then, once his head came back far enough the tape got behind his ears, he got a good jolt. 

He jumped back and looked at the tape like, “What the hell was that?” Then he eased up to it and nosed it lightly–zap. Now he knew what it was and has never gone near it again–except once by accident. 

The point is, it is not really that hard to do. If you have an animal that is a fence crasher, cull it right away–it will teach the others.

FOLLOW LAND AND LIVESTOCK INTERNATIONAL ON FACE BOOK!

via Premier 1 Supply

Wide Tape Rope

For most cattle one strand of tape (or rope) is enough for a subdivision fence. Set conductor height at or below nose level.Q. What is the fence’s location? Is it flat? Or does it go over hills and ditches and around curves? Is it covered with brush, trees or open grass? Are the soils rocky, very soft, sandy or firm?
A.The optimum fence design often hinges on answers to these questions.Q. Do the animals know the fence?
A. Local animals and wildlife get to “know” a fence by appearance, location and “pain memory.” If it’s a strong or painful fence they avoid it. On the other hand new animals just off a truck often charge into permanent fences and straight through temporary or semi-permanent fences. That’s why strong, tall, visible permanent fences are essential for corrals and feedlots. Temporary fences that are not physically strong pose the greatest risk of escape to newly acquired animals. It pays to train them to it inside of a permanent fence.

Q. What specific animals need to be fenced in or out?
A. Always design and build for the most difficult species. Rules of thumb:

Most sheep and goat fences will stop cattle and horses. The inverse is not always true.
Fencing adult males (bulls, rams, stallions, billies) in/out during breeding season requires taller fences with closer wire/strand spacing and more powerful electric pulses (in joules, not volts).
Fences for mixed sizes (ewes with lambs, etc.) need more strands than uniform animal groups.
Certain breeds need better fences (e.g. flighty Romanov sheep, tall Columbia sheep, Chianina cattle).

Q. Should you energize the fence?
A. It pays to do this. Why?

A “hot” strand has a “zone of pain.” So fewer strands are needed if one is energized. Both the material and the labor to install is reduced.
Energized fences last longer and require less maintenance—because animals do not crowd, rub or scratch on them. So the fence wires (including wires that are not energized) require less tension to do their job. And braces and corner posts will last longer.
Animals are more surely contained or excluded during breeding and weaning.

Q. How keen will animals be to breach the fence line?
A. Build for the worst-case situation (if you can afford to do so).

Hunger. Starved animals will eventually challenge most fences.
Weaning. Strong physical barriers are needed.
Breeding. Libido induces all creatures to challenge rules and especially fences.
Boredom. Animals in corrals, stalls and feedlots crave any “entertainment” or activity.
Gateways and handling yards. Animals often push each other into fences when being moved.
Fear and fright. Predators or loud noises can cause “prey” species (e.g. horses, goats, turkeys) to run in terror straight into, under, over or through any fence, no matter what fence design (netting, high-tensile or woven wire).

Today’s free newsletter is supported completely from royalties earned on the sale of the books described below. Please help keep us going by buying the books if you haven’t already. Also, AND ESPECIALLY, please share with all your social networks and ask your friends and contacts to do the same. You are appreciated.

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Books by Dr. Jimmy T. (Gunny) LaBaume

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual by Jimmy T (Gunny) LaBaume.

This guide is a detailed book review of sorts, but perhaps it would be more accurately described as an abstract that condenses 864 pages of detail into 189 pages of concentrated information. No more excuses for failing to properly plan your grazing. The booklet is available from Amazon.com in both soft cover and Kendall versions. Click here. 

CoverA Handbook for Ranch Managers A Comprehensive Reference Manual for Managing the Working Ranch. Click here to buy the paperback version from Land & Livestock International’s Rancher Supply aStore.

Digital media products such as Kindle can only be purchased on Amazon.com. Click Here to buy the Kendall Version on Amazon.com

To purchase an autographed copy of the book Click Here

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Product DetailsCall for a pizza, a cop, and an ambulance and see which one arrives first.

So, who does that leave to protect you, your life, property and family?

The one and only answer is: YOU

This Handbook is intended to help you exercise that right and meet that responsibility.

Combat Shooter’s Handbook is available from Amazon.com in both paperback and Kindle versions.

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The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsThe Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits.  Click here to buy the paperback version from Land & Livestock International’s Rancher Supply aStore.

Digital media products such as Kindle can only be purchased on Amazon.com. Click Here to buy the Kendall Version on Amazon.com

About Land & Livestock Interntional, Inc.

Land and Livestock International, Inc. is a leading agribusiness management firm providing a complete line of services to the range livestock industry. We believe that private property is the foundation of America. Private property and free markets go hand in hand—without property there is no freedom. We also believe that free markets, not government intervention, hold the key to natural resource conservation and environmental preservation. No government bureaucrat can (or will) understand and treat the land with as much respect as its owner. The bureaucrat simply does not have the same motives as does the owner of a capital interest in the property. Our specialty is the working livestock ranch simply because there are so many very good reasons for owning such a property. We provide educational, management and consulting services with a focus on ecologically and financially sustainable land management that will enhance natural processes (water and mineral cycles, energy flow and community dynamics) while enhancing profits and steadily building wealth.
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