Sustainability is in sight

“Yes, there has been a conspiracy. However I do not believe that it was an overt conspiracy of men. Instead, it was a conspiracy of ideas. Our Enemy the State is waging war on all fronts—not always perfectly choreographed or even in concert—but always toward one goal—collectivism. And the ultimate result? As William Lind put it, “The fall of Rome was graceful by comparison.” From: Explaining Liberty to Liberals, Democratic Socialists,  Neo-Conservatives and Fascist Alike

As many of you know, I sometimes publish things that I do not agree with or believe in myself simply because I believe that my job is to keep you (the subscriber) informed. This is the case with the article below “Sustainability is in sight” which appeared in a recent edition of Canadian Cattlemen.

The following was extracted from the Preface of Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Field Manual.

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualA few comments on the terminology: Those even vaguely familiar with the “holistic” approach to planned grazing will immediately recognize that I have avoided the use of certain “buzz” words that, frankly, offend me and for good reason. Take, for example, the words holistic and sustainability.

By dictionary definition, both words have meanings to which hardly anyone could object. Who in their right mind could be opposed to sustainable agriculture? Especially when dealing with human and natural systems, very few would deny the concept that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts or that the organization’s land, its people and their money should be viewed as one.

Never-the-less, these words have been co-opted by malevolent and misguided elements in society and incorporated into a code that furthers their agenda. This terminology has become the language of radical environmentalism as advocated by the United Nations and its Agenda 21.

This massive wealth re-distribution scheme is one of the most destructive forces of life, liberty and property ever faced by mankind. Their claims that overpopulation, declining energy resources, deforestationspecies losswater shortages, certain aspects of global warming, and an assortment of other global environmental issues are unsupported by analysis of the relevant data.

Where” Holistic” Management Crosses Paths with Agenda 21: The anti-private property and anti-free market “sustainable development” movement utilizes triple-bottom-line accounting (TBL). TBL was created by the United Nations to advance the four main initiatives birthed at the 1992 U.N. Earth Summit in Rio de Janerio: Climate Change, Agenda 21.

TBL (also known as people, planet, profit or ‘the three pillars’) captures an expanded spectrum of values and criteria for measuring organizational (and societal) success: economic, ecological and social.

With the ratification of the United Nations and ICLEEI (International Council for Local Environmental Initiatives) TBL became the standard for urban and community accounting in early 2007.

It has now become the dominant approach to public-sector full-cost accounting. In the private sector, a commitment to corporate social responsibility (CSR) implies a commitment to some form of TBL reporting.

With Holistic Management, decisions are made and tested for soundness and to make sure they will take you toward your holistic goal. There are seven of these tests, including “sustainability, society and culture” – i.e. echoes of Agenda 21.

Of course, people who make their living in the free market know that economics already accounts for “society” and “environment.”

Every day in every purchase decision made by each of the approximately 330 million people in the United States, a value is given to society and environment through price. Imposing a value for society and environment ensures they are double counted.

No matter how well-intended industry’s acknowledgement of the triple bottom line, there is no escaping the fact that it sets producers up for a tax at some point in the future. Whatever extraneous values are agreed to will eventually become a financial penalty on production.

We do not advocate the use of triple bottom line accounting.

End of Extracted-Inserted Paragraphs

Please keep those caveats in mind while you try to sort through the high brow language and radical environmentalist gobbeldegook of the following article. And pay particular attention (as in read between the lines) to the paragraph toward the end:  

This is not a government program. It comes from the retail and processing sectors in response to what they see as a growing demand from consumers around the globe. With names like JBS, Cargill, Tyson, Walmart and Costco at the table looking for steady sources of verified sustainable beef, it doesn’t take a crystal ball to see that this will become a base requirement for the industry in the near future.

Is there anybody out there willing to bet that this will NEVER become mandatory and enforced at the point of a government gun somewhere down the road?  Here is the article:

By Gren Winslow in Beef Cattle

The world agrees on a definition

As we look ahead to 2015 I imagine most of you are anticipating, or hoping, for a repeat of 2014. We can’t always see what lies ahead, but in at least one small aspect I’m pretty confident that you are going to hear the word sustainability crop up in conversations a lot more in the coming year.

The sustainability movement picked up a full head of steam last month in Sao Paulo, Brazil when the Global Roundtable for Sustainable Beef (GRSB) released its master plan for establishing sustainable beef production around the world.

The GRSB defines sustainable beef as a socially responsible, environmentally sound and economically viable product that prioritizes the planet, people, animals and progress.

This is further refined into five core principles: natural resources, people and the community, animal health and well-being, food and efficiency and innovation. Each principle is propped up by its own set of criteria that need to be fulfilled.

Natural resources criteria include environmental stewardship, ecological services, minimizing net greenhouse gas emissions, protecting native forests, grasslands and other ecosystems, biodiversity, water resources, air quality, soil health and sustainable feed production.

People and community criteria emphasize the need to respect culture, heritage, people’s way of life, human rights, property rights and laws of the land and create fair and safe workplaces.

Animal health and welfare criteria set expectations for the treatment of cattle throughout the value chain. General areas include nutrition, disease control and treatment, responsible drug and vaccine use, appropriate housing, minimizing stress and transport guidelines.

Food criteria address food safety and beef quality from the perspective that improvements and indicators need to be science based, practical and have an impact. Documentation and validation of production/process practices and management systems, sharing information and reducing food waste throughout the chain also fall under this principle.

The efficiency and innovation criteria speak to continuous improvement by adopting technology and leading practices that will help the beef industry adapt to challenges and seize opportunities. It encompasses education, partnerships and sharing knowledge, to selecting and managing cattle to match the environment and available resources, efficient use of water, land and energy while reducing waste, responsible use of production inputs to maximizing carcass value.

It’s now up to national and regional round-tables to apply the GRSB blueprint at the local level. This process involves defining what needs to be measured to achieve sustainable beef criteria in a given country and how to verify the outcomes to qualify for a sustainable beef designation across a value chain.

In Canada, that task falls to the Canadian Roundtable for Sustainable Beef (CRSB).

The current membership includes provincial and national beef industry associations, dairy and barley producer groups, conservation organizations, and businesses representing the packing, retail, food-service, animal health, and financial sectors.

Some of the pieces are already in place such as the Verified Beef Production program, the Beef InfoXChange System (BIXS), and environmental farm plans but the CRSB will be spending a good part of 2015 developing other sustainability indicators, according to Fawn Jackson, the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association manager of environment and sustainability.

She is the CCA’s representative on the global roundtable and involved in this process from the beginning to ensure that beef producers have a say in how sustainability is defined and the practicality of the recommended production practices that will be required to bring it about in Canada.

This is not a government program. It comes from the retail and processing sectors in response to what they see as a growing demand from consumers around the globe. With names like JBS, Cargill, Tyson, Walmart and Costco at the table looking for steady sources of verified sustainable beef, it doesn’t take a crystal ball to see that this will become a base requirement for the industry in the near future.

The CRSB is already working with McDonald’s Canada to develop indicators to source sustainable Canadian beef by 2016.

Currently the CRSB is looking for 80 cow-calf and feedlot producers across the country to complete a survey for a Canadian beef life cycle analysis to establish benchmarks and then a plan to put those benchmarks to work.

The analysis part should be wrapped up by next summer. So, when it comes to sustainable beef, the near future may be nearer than you think.

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Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualPlanned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual. This is the ideal squeal to A Handbook for Ranch Managers.  Although the ecological principles remain the same, what was originally known as “The Savory Grazing Method” now answers to a multitude of different names: ranching for profit, holistic management, managed grazing, mob grazing, management intensive grazing, etc. Land & Livestock International, Inc. uses “Restoration Grazing” under its “Managing the Ranch as a Business” program.” No mater what you call it, this summary and synopsis will guide you step by step through the process and teach you how to use it as it was originally intended. No more excuses for failing to complete your grazing plans.

You might be interested in this books supplemental volume: A Handbook for Ranch Managers.

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About Land & Livestock Interntional, Inc.

Land and Livestock International, Inc. is a leading agribusiness management firm providing a complete line of services to the range livestock industry. We believe that private property is the foundation of America. Private property and free markets go hand in hand—without property there is no freedom. We also believe that free markets, not government intervention, hold the key to natural resource conservation and environmental preservation. No government bureaucrat can (or will) understand and treat the land with as much respect as its owner. The bureaucrat simply does not have the same motives as does the owner of a capital interest in the property. Our specialty is the working livestock ranch simply because there are so many very good reasons for owning such a property. We provide educational, management and consulting services with a focus on ecologically and financially sustainable land management that will enhance natural processes (water and mineral cycles, energy flow and community dynamics) while enhancing profits and steadily building wealth.
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One Response to Sustainability is in sight

  1. futuret says:

    THERE IS A REASON WHY I BELIEVE THIS PLANET WILL NEVER HAVE SUSTAINABILITY, FOR THE REASON WE HAVE BEEN DISOBEDIENT TO YAHVEH(GOD), AND FOR THIS VERY REASON THE SOIL IS LOOSING IT’S NURIENTS. FOR SIX YEARS WE SHOULD PLANT AND STORE FOOD AND ON THE SEVENTH YEAR WE SHOULD NOT PLANT, BECAUSE WE MUST OBSERVE A SABBATH. WE CAN MAINTAIN WHAT WE HAVE, BUT WE CAN NOT PLANT OBSERVING A SABBATH YEAR, THE SOIL HAS A LIFE OF IT’S OWN AND MUST BE GIVEN RESPECT AND ALLOWED TO REST. WE SHOULD STORE FOOD IN THE SIX YEAR PERIOD ALLOWED. FOR EXAMPLE, IF I BOUGHT A HOUSE AND PLANETED A GARDEN, I CAN FROM THE TIME I BOUGHT THE HOUSE I CAN PLANT FOOD, TREES, AND FLOWERS, BUT ON THE SEVENTH YEAR I AM NOT ALLOWED TO PLANT ANYTHING, BUT I CAN MAINTAIN WHAT I DO HAVE. FOR SIX YEARS WE ARE ALLOWED TO STORE FOR HUMANS AND ANIMALS. AFTER SEVENTH YEARS HAS PASTED, WE CAN THEN PLANET AND PLAN AGAIN. THIS COMING SEPTEMBER 2015, WE SHALL BE ENTERING A JUBILEE YEAR.

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