Mentorship, and pasture tips and tricks

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersThere are some pretty neat tricks here. I can add a little to a couple of them:

1. My guardian pig: Great idea and reminds me of holding goats with three strands of slick wire up in Tonto National Forest in Arizona. We hung beer and soda cans on the fence and painted them with molasses.  Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual The old nanny goat would go up to the fence, lick the can, snort and shake her head and never go back close to that fence ever again. In fact, it got to be a problem because a narrow strip of grass just beneath the fence grew so high as to short the fence out.

3. The hammer trick: In Colorado we used to do essentially the same Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian Viewthing when repairing fence after a hard winter (a regular spring time operation). We carried a roll of slick wire with us to patch the broken fence with. We would put a loop in each end of the broken barbed wire. Then cut off a peace of slick wire long enough to fill the gap. Then we would spin the slick wire around the hammer head and tie it off. This avoided the problem of hanging up on the barbs. 

 Combat Shooter's HandbookReminds me of a funny story. I had been doing this all morning one morning–all by myself up in the San Juan mountain foothills. Noon came and I backed up against a pine tree to eat my sandwich. I looked up and right there in front of my eyes was the biggest damned bull Elk I had ever seen. The sumbitch calmly walked up to my newly repaired fence, stuck his antlers into it, twisted his neck and steeples shot out of posts for about Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute a mile in both directions. Then he just calmly stepped over it and went on his way. If I had had a gun big enough, I’d a shot him.

6. The Raptor Perch: Another great idea. The way we always handled it was to sell prairie dog hunting rights and thereby generate a little revenue out of it.

The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsHope y’all enjoy (and benefit) from these tips and tricks. — jtl, 419

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About Land & Livestock Interntional, Inc.

Land and Livestock International, Inc. is a leading agribusiness management firm providing a complete line of services to the range livestock industry. We believe that private property is the foundation of America. Private property and free markets go hand in hand—without property there is no freedom. We also believe that free markets, not government intervention, hold the key to natural resource conservation and environmental preservation. No government bureaucrat can (or will) understand and treat the land with as much respect as its owner. The bureaucrat simply does not have the same motives as does the owner of a capital interest in the property. Our specialty is the working livestock ranch simply because there are so many very good reasons for owning such a property. We provide educational, management and consulting services with a focus on ecologically and financially sustainable land management that will enhance natural processes (water and mineral cycles, energy flow and community dynamics) while enhancing profits and steadily building wealth.
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3 Responses to Mentorship, and pasture tips and tricks

  1. futuret says:

    THE FENCE LOOKS INTERESTING AND SEEMS TO BE GEOMETRICALLY MEASURED. IT WOULD BE A GOOD IDEA TO USE TREATED WOOD, TO PREVENT TERMITES IN CERTAIN LOCALITIES. THIS WAY THE WOOD WOULD ENSURE THE STRENGTH OF THE BARB WIRE AND ELIMINATE FURTHER DECAY. SEASONS OF CLIMATE SHOULD BE TAKEN INTO CONSIDERATION. MUST SAY, AGRICULTURE DOES HAVE IT’S BABY SITTING MOMENTS.

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    • Actually, that looked like a very old fence with cedar posts. Technology had surpassed that type of fence in both effectiveness and cost. We have learned that we can hold cattle with two strands of slick wire (carrying 6 to 7,000 volts) and fiberglass posts spaced 40 feet apart. You can build a fence like that (vs. the old traditional wooden post fence) for pennies on the dollar.

      I even hold horses with one strand of tape.

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      • futuret says:

        THANKS FOR THE EDUCATION. BY THE WAY WE SURE COULD USE MENTOR SHIP IN ALL AREAS OF LIFE, AGRICULTURE IS NOT THE ONLY PLACE WHERE WE NEED IT. LOVE TO ALL WHO STRIVE IN LABOR, AND FOR THE PRESERVATION OF GETTING FOOD TO OUR TABLES BOTH LAND AND SEA.

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