Horse Overpopulation Update

Today, the estimated population is about 73,000 wild horses and burros in 10 Western states, a record number since the 1971 Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act was passed…That is almost three times the number the habitat can sustainably support in conjunction with other land uses.

 

Horse Overpopulation Update

GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. – The Bureau of Land Management’s National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board will meet Oct. 18-19 in Grand Junction, Colorado, to discuss the pressing challenges of wild horse and burro overpopulation on public lands and the impacts they are having on the range.

The meeting will be live-streamed from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mountain Time at http://www.blm.gov/live.

“The rapid growth rate and chronic overpopulation of the West’s wild horses are already affecting the health of the animals and the resources on which they and many other species depend,” said Acting BLM Director Michael Nedd.  “To be effective in solving this challenge, we must work together to explore a wide variety of solutions to an unsustainable situation.”

Today, the estimated population is about 73,000 wild horses and burros in 10 Western states, a record number since the 1971 Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act was passed.

That is almost three times the number the habitat can sustainably support in conjunction with other land uses.

The agenda of the upcoming meeting can be found in the October 3, 2017, Federal Register at https://www.federalregister.gov/d/2017-20935 .

The meeting will be held at the Grand Vista Hotel, 2790 Crossroads Boulevard at Horizon Drive. The hotel’s website address is www.grandvistahotel.com; its phone number is (970) 241-1077.

Prior to the Advisory Board meeting, a field tour will be held on Tuesday, Oct. 17, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. MT departing from the Grand Vista Hotel lobby in Grand Junction.

The field tour will have limited availability for the public on a first-come, first-served advance sign up.

Attendees must provide for their own transportation (four-wheel drive recommended). To sign up, contact Dorothea Boothe by email no later than Oct. 6, at dboothe@blm.gov.

The public may address the Advisory Board on Wednesday from 3 to 5 p.m. Mountain Time. Individuals who want to make a statement should register in person with the BLM prior to 3 p.m. local time, on that same day at the meeting site. Depending on the number of speakers, the Board may limit the length of presentations, set at three minutes for previous meetings.

Speakers should submit a written copy of their statement to the BLM at the addresses below or bring a copy to the meeting. There will be a webcam present during the entire meeting and individual comments may be recorded. Those who would like to comment but are unable to attend may submit a written statement to: National Wild Horse and Burro Program, WO-261, Attention: Ramona DeLorme, 1340 Financial Boulevard, Reno, Nev., 89502-7147.

Comments may also be emailed to the BLM at whbadvisoryboard@blm.gov; please include “Advisory Board Comment” in the subject line of the e-mail.

The Advisory Board provides advice and recommendations to the BLM as it carries out its responsibilities under the 1971 Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act.

The law mandates the protection and management of these free-roaming animals in a manner that ensures healthy herds at levels consistent with the land’s capacity to sustainably support them along with other uses of the land.

For additional information regarding the meeting, please contact Ramona DeLorme, Wild Horse and Burro Administrative Assistant, at (775) 861-6583.

Individuals who use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) may reach DeLorme during normal business hours by calling the Federal Information Relay Service at 1-800-877-8339.

Land and Livestock International, Inc. is in a position to assist the buyer in purchasing ranches like these anywhere in the Western United States and Northern Mexico. Pre – purchase services include help with due diligence, estimates of carrying capacity and potential for improvement, cash flow projections, etc. Post purchase services include everything from part time consulting to complete turn-key management.

Contact us at info@landandlivestockinternational.com or through our web site at www.landandlivestockinternational.com

Dripping Springs
Mule Creek, Grant County, New Mexico

The Dripping Springs Ranch is a highly improved working cattle ranch in a very desirable part of southwest New Mexico. Access to the Ranch from State Route 78 is excellent, and it is an easy drive to either Silver City, N. or Safford, Az. 232 deeded acres, 13,000 USFS acres, 150 AU. $2,500,000

Walking L Ranch
Wickenburg, Yavapai County

The Walking L Ranch’s 52+ square miles adjoin Wickenburg from the Hassayamapa River into the Wickenburg Mountains. The ranch originally consisted of the 10X Ranch on the south end and the Rincon Ranch on the north end.  The old Rincon Dude Ranch was added to the ranch’s Headquarters by the current owner. The ranch’s land tenure consists of deeded land, State and BLM Grazing Leases.  Topography is rolling to steep with elevation’s ranging from 2,100’ along the river to over 2,700’ on San Domingo Peak.  The ranch borders US 60 on the south side of Wickenburg.  The ranch’s deeded land is in seven non-contiguous parcels throughout the ranch.  The headquarters consists of 110.88 deeded acres on Rincon Road and the Hassayampa River with approximately 30 acres irrigated.  Another headquarters for the 10X is on the state lease. $5,000,000

Dos S Inholding
Fountain Hills, Maricopa County

The Dos S is a 22.78 acre private inholding surrounded by Tonto National Forest on Sycamore Creek.  It is located just off the Beeline Highway behind a locked gate 20 miles from the Shea Boulevard & Highway 87 intersection at Fountain Hills.  Payson is 40 miles to the north. $1,025,100

Advertisements

About Land & Livestock Interntional, Inc.

Land and Livestock International, Inc. is a leading agribusiness management firm providing a complete line of services to the range livestock industry. We believe that private property is the foundation of America. Private property and free markets go hand in hand—without property there is no freedom. We also believe that free markets, not government intervention, hold the key to natural resource conservation and environmental preservation. No government bureaucrat can (or will) understand and treat the land with as much respect as its owner. The bureaucrat simply does not have the same motives as does the owner of a capital interest in the property. Our specialty is the working livestock ranch simply because there are so many very good reasons for owning such a property. We provide educational, management and consulting services with a focus on ecologically and financially sustainable land management that will enhance natural processes (water and mineral cycles, energy flow and community dynamics) while enhancing profits and steadily building wealth.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized, Wild Horses and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Horse Overpopulation Update

  1. Rich says:

    These “feral” horses – only a romantic believes they are descendants of 16th century Spanish mounts – evidence an inevitable problem created by the lack of private property. The obstacle is not unowned horses but unowned land. If, to cope with unmanageable debt, for example, all public lands were sold to private owners, the problem of “feral” horses would end overnight.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s