Cowgirl Sass and Savvy (revisited) Dirt roads, rough hands and sweat-soaked Stetsons

I have lived down a dirt road most of my life. It is a world unto itself no matter what decade it is. Weeks are without weekends as everyday is the same.

Me too. There is nothing more relaxing than cruising slowly down a dirt road checking waters and pasture condition with a cooler full of ice cold beer in the bed of the truck. — jtl, 419

 

By Julie Carter via THE WESTERNER

Something wholesome radiates from a person who lives in the realm of cowboy.

Show a photo of a young rodeo hand or a seasoned veteran of the cow wars to a city-folk type and one of their first comments will be to point that out.

There are a number of things that promote the wholesome image of ranch and rural living. Some of them come with their own deeper meanings of life and have infinite depth beyond face value.

A few of those things are dirt roads, rough hands and sweat-soaked Stetsons.

Dirt roads lead to good things. They slow down life and often end at the open door of a welcoming neighbor.

They signify a way of life that has not yet fallen to the asphalt and concrete of a white-collar world.

I have lived down a dirt road most of my life. It is a world unto itself no matter what decade it is. Weeks are without weekends as everyday is the same.

Childhood memories are of endless summers with homemade ice cream, digging for fishing worms and camping along the creek.

When I turn down a dirt road headed to anywhere, I get a “right at home” kind of feeling knowing when I get to where I’m going, it’ll be good. A dirt road drive is often a step back in time.

Rough hands of the men and women who work on the land command a deep respect. Those people come with a firm handshake and wisdom born in the sweat equity of life.

The calluses are badges of determination that tell a story matched by the lines around the eyes.

Years of physical work and suppressed worry leave their mark.

There are truly fine people attached to those hands that could sand a board smooth without sandpaper. Like their hands, they are hard as steel at first glance but found to have a gentle nature within. The burdens of life have been worked out through their hands.

And those sweat-soaked Stetsons – that band of dark dirty grime that builds up at the bottom of the crown and spreads out onto the brim – is a cowboy’s emblem of never-ending toil.

My dad wore what was my first memory of that icon of the West. Some years after he passed away I wrote a poem about him and included mention of his hat that was so much part of who he was.

He lived in the days when a contract was a man’s handshake.

Too far to town, so you made do with what you could make.

Denim shirts, bags of Bull Durham, and rollin’ your own,

A sweat-soaked Stetson, shotgun chaps, and a saddle were home.

Those toil-marked hats come in many shapes, colors and sizes. When they have reached the sweat-soaked stage, they take on a common out-of-shape look. They have creases and curls where there should be none and they droop in places not intended for “style.”

Often they have a hole or two rotted completely through the brim or the crown.

They wear a little windmill grease, manure and a few blood spatters from a long ago cow-in-the-chute incident.

As time goes by, the hat uncannily takes on an appearance that very much matches the personality of its owner.

Dirt roads, rough hands and sweat-soaked Stetsons – all things so very much more than just what they are.

© Julie Carter 2007

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersLand & Livestock International, Inc is offering a “Free” week-long ranch management-planned grazing seminar- workshop.

What follows is a business model we have been following that has worked very well for us and for our clientele.

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualWe are seeking individual ranchers to sponsor/host workshops . The sponsor/host (and spouse or key employee) get the training at his/her ranch for no charge. This is an extra special benefit to the host as his/her land will be used for the “lab” work and hands on demonstrations. This provides a great start in the implementation of his/her program.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewIn return, he/she takes care of the logistics involved in putting on the event. This includes arranging for the venue, booking a block of rooms for lodging, arranging for meals (if any), putting out the advertising, setting and collecting the fees and so forth.

We are then responsible for putting on the workshop.

During the interim we will each keep track of our out of pocket costs (from our end, that will be mostly travel and lodging). Then, when it is all over, we both are reimbursed our out of pocket costs and split any funds remaining 50:50.

If this sounds like something you might be interested in, click here and let us know. If the link won’t work for you, copy and paste info@landandlivestockinternational.com into your browser.

About Land & Livestock Interntional, Inc.

Land and Livestock International, Inc. is a leading agribusiness management firm providing a complete line of services to the range livestock industry. We believe that private property is the foundation of America. Private property and free markets go hand in hand—without property there is no freedom. We also believe that free markets, not government intervention, hold the key to natural resource conservation and environmental preservation. No government bureaucrat can (or will) understand and treat the land with as much respect as its owner. The bureaucrat simply does not have the same motives as does the owner of a capital interest in the property. Our specialty is the working livestock ranch simply because there are so many very good reasons for owning such a property. We provide educational, management and consulting services with a focus on ecologically and financially sustainable land management that will enhance natural processes (water and mineral cycles, energy flow and community dynamics) while enhancing profits and steadily building wealth.
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1 Response to Cowgirl Sass and Savvy (revisited) Dirt roads, rough hands and sweat-soaked Stetsons

  1. Reblogged this on Flyover-Press.com and commented:

    Me too. There is nothing more relaxing than cruising slowly down a dirt road checking waters and pasture condition with a cooler full of ice cold beer in the bed of the truck. — jtl, 419

    Like

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