New Mexico Dems call federal government’s wolf recovery plan ‘flawed, politically driven’

Demopublicans, Republicrats, Wolves, all the same difference. Not a dime’s worth. — jtl, 419
A Handbook for Ranch Managers By Rebecca Moss | The Santa Fe New Mexican

 

Several Democratic lawmakers in New Mexico say the federal government’s proposed approach to managing the recovery of the Mexican gray wolf population, which the state government has signed off on, is a “flawed, politically driven” plan that will shortchange the species and could lead to extinction.

 

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual In an Aug. 29 letter to Amy Lueders, regional director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for the Southwest region, the lawmakers said the draft recovery plan could be fatal for the wolves.

 

The plan, they wrote, “is critically flawed and does not represent the best scientific and commercial data available.”

 

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewThe 21 Democrats opposing the wolf recovery plan include nine state senators and representatives from Albuquerque and the surrounding area, seven lawmakers from the Las Cruces area and five from the Santa Fe area: Sens. Peter Wirth, Nancy Rodriguez and Liz Stefanics, and Reps. Linda Trujillo and Matthew McQueen.

Released in late June, the proposed wolf management plan has faced mounting opposition.

 

Combat Shooter's Handbook Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsThe lawmakers’ letter comes a week after the federal government closed the docket for public comment. More than 9,000 online comments were submitted, along with thousands more by mail, many in agreement with the Democratic lawmakers that the plan will do more to suppress than grow the species’ population.

Critics of the draft management plan, which has a court-ordered deadline of November, say additional markers are needed to ensure genetic diversity among the wolf population in New Mexico and Arizona.

 

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)The state lawmakers, in their letter to Lueders, call for numbers of the species to be raised much higher — closer to 750 wolves rather than 380, as outlined in the plan — before wolves can be removed from the wild or relocated to Mexico. And they say the range in which the wolves can be released should be expanded. The draft plan only allows releases south of Interstate 40.

 

At last count, there were 113 Mexican gray wolves in New Mexico and Arizona and little genetic diversity among them.

 

Those who live closest to wolf release sites in New Mexico, near the Gila Wilderness, say the wolves are predatory and threaten valuable livestock. Some say the right number of wolves in the wild is zero.

 

U.S. Rep. Steve Pearce, R-N.M., New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez, the state Department of Game and Fish and the State Game Commission have voiced support for more conservative reintroduction efforts and restraint.

 

The State Game Commission gave its approval of the draft management plan, as it is, last month.

 

But wolf advocates argue the draft plan cedes too much power to the interests of the ranching community and Republicans, rather than basing management strategies on the latest scientific data.

 

Under the Obama administration, the state and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service were entangled in litigation over which agency had the authority to allow or prohibit wolf releases. The state sought to prevent releases on the basis that an updated management plan for the wolves did not exist. The federal government said it had the authority to supersede the state under the Endangered Species Act.

 

A federal district court initially blocked the Fish and Wildlife Service from releasing captive-born wolves into the wild in the state, but an appeals court reversed the decision and said the releases could continue.

 

Contact Rebecca Moss at 505-986-3011 or rmoss@sfnewmexican.com.

 

FOLLOW FLYOVER PRESS ON FACEBOOK

Check out our WebSite

Check out our e-Store

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View

edited by

Dr Jimmy T (Gunny) LaBaume

Is now available in both PAPERBACK and Kindle

BookCoverImageMurray N. Rothbard was the father of what some call Radical Libertarianism or Anarcho-Capitalism which Hans-Hermann Hoppe described as “Rothbard’s unique contribution to the rediscovery of property and property rights as the common foundation of both economics and political philosophy, and the systematic reconstruction and conceptual integration of modern, marginalist economics and natural-law political philosophy into a unified moral science: libertarianism.”

This book applies the principles of this “unified moral science” to environmental and natural resource management issues.

The book started out life as an assigned reading list for a university level course entitled Environmental and Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View.

As I began to prepare to teach the course, I quickly saw that there was a plethora of textbooks suitable for universal level courses dealing with environmental and natural resource economics. The only problem was that they were all based in mainstream neo-classical (or Keynesian) theory. I could find no single collection of material comprising a comprehensive treatment of environmental and natural resource economics based on Austrian Economic Theory.

However, I was able to find a large number of essays, monographs, papers delivered at professional meetings and published from a multitude of sources. This book is the result. It is composed of a collection of research reports and essays by reputable scientists, economists, and legal experts as well as private property and free market activists.

The book is organized into seven parts: I. Environmentalism: The New State Religion; II. The New State Religion Debunked; III. Introduction to Environmental and Natural Resource Economics; IV. Interventionism: Law and Regulation; V. Pollution and Recycling; VI. Property Rights: Planning, Zoning and Eminent Domain; and VII. Free Market Conservation. It also includes an elaborate Bibliography, References and Recommended Reading section including an extensive Annotated Bibliography of related and works on the subject.

The intellectual level of the individual works ranges from quite scholarly to informed editorial opinion.

FOLLOW LAND & LIVESTOCK INTERNATIONAL ON FACEBOOK

Check out our WebSite

Check out our Online Rancher Supply Store

 

Advertisements
Posted in Grey Wolf, Uncategorized, Wolves | Tagged , | Leave a comment

EPA Has Slashed Its Criminal Investigation Division in Half

The Environmental Protection Agency employs about half as many criminal investigators as it did a more than a decade ago…

That is half of what should have been cut. But never-the-less it is the best news I’ve had all day. I remember being appalled when I was first told that the National Park Service actually had its own SWAT units. Don’t try to tell me we don’t live in a “police state.” — jtl, 419

Investigators help prevent public health crises like the one in Flint, Mich.
Investigators help prevent public health crises like the one in Flint, Mich. Carlos Osorio/AP file photo 

The Environmental Protection Agency employs about half as many criminal investigators as it did a more than a decade ago, according to newly released documents, corresponding to a dramatic dropoff in the number of new criminal cases against those who violate environmental laws and regulations.

EPA currently has 147 special agents in its Criminal Investigation Division, according to documents obtained through a federal records request by Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility, less than half the number it employed in 2003 and well below the 200-agent floor established by Congress in 1990. The division opened 170 new cases in fiscal 2016, down 47 percent from fiscal 2012. It is on pace to open just 120 cases this fiscal year. Actual convictions have dropped at a similar rate.

The reduction in agents exceeds the workforce declines at EPA agencywide over the last several years. EPA has shed more than 2,500 employees, or about 14 percent of its workforce, since 2010. The agents in the criminal division are white collar workers, generally with backgrounds as attorneys or accountants.

EPA shifted to a new enforcement system called Next Generation Compliance in 2014, which the agency said would ease oversight through electronic reporting and “advanced pollution detection technology.” PEER argued, however, that the technology has led to industry self-reporting and fewer cases for EPA’s criminal division to investigate. Jeff Ruch, PEER’s executive director, said there is no evidence that companies have increased their compliance and cases like Volkswagen misrepresenting the emissions stemming from its vehicles prove stringent regulatory oversight is still necessary. EPA only issued a notice of violation in the Volkswagen case in 2015 after scientists from West Virginia University submitted their own findings to the International Council on Clean Transportation.

New cases related to the 1972 Clean Water Act fell by half between fiscal years 2012 and 2016, while those connected to the 1963 Clean Air Act went down by 60 percent in the same period.

Ruch noted that absent a few “big-ticket items,” such as the Volkswagen case and the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, recent convictions would be far lower. The agency’s cuts, he said, were not made to save money.

“We’re not talking about a large investment here,” Ruch said. “It’s a political decision.”

He expressed concern the trend, which was accelerated mostly in the Obama administration, would face an even worse fate under President Trump and EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt.

“Pruitt’s known aversion to punishing corporate polluters threatens to hollow out what remains of EPA’s Criminal Investigation Division,” Ruch said.

EPA is in the process of downsizing its workforce. The agency plans to spend $12 million by the end of September to encourage employees to leave through early retirement and buyout offers, and Congress is pushing funding for more separation incentives in fiscal 2018. The Trump administration is also seeking to slash the number of regulations with which private companies must comply, requiring agencies to eliminate or streamline two rules for every new one they introduce and sending task forces across government to identify those no longer necessary.

Still, Ruch predicted if EPA continues to cut employees from CID, public health crises like that seen in Flint, Michigan, will continue to occur.

“Not having any kind of enforcement arm means you’re going to wage the clean water battle with at least one arm tied behind your back,” he said.

An EPA spokeswoman declined to comment.

Land and Livestock International, Inc. is in a position to assist the buyer in purchasing ranches like these anywhere in the Western United States and Northern Mexico. Pre – purchase services include help with due diligence, estimates of carrying capacity and potential for improvement, cash flow projections, etc. Post purchase services include everything from part time consulting to complete turn-key management.

Contact us at info@landandlivestockinternational.com or through our web site at www.landandlivestockinternational.com

Dripping Springs
Mule Creek, Grant County, New Mexico

The Dripping Springs Ranch is a highly improved working cattle ranch in a very desirable part of southwest New Mexico. Access to the Ranch from State Route 78 is excellent, and it is an easy drive to either Silver City, N. or Safford, Az. 232 deeded acres, 13,000 USFS acres, 150 AU. $2,500,000

Walking L Ranch
Wickenburg, Yavapai County

The Walking L Ranch’s 52+ square miles adjoin Wickenburg from the Hassayamapa River into the Wickenburg Mountains. The ranch originally consisted of the 10X Ranch on the south end and the Rincon Ranch on the north end.  The old Rincon Dude Ranch was added to the ranch’s Headquarters by the current owner. The ranch’s land tenure consists of deeded land, State and BLM Grazing Leases.  Topography is rolling to steep with elevation’s ranging from 2,100’ along the river to over 2,700’ on San Domingo Peak.  The ranch borders US 60 on the south side of Wickenburg.  The ranch’s deeded land is in seven non-contiguous parcels throughout the ranch.  The headquarters consists of 110.88 deeded acres on Rincon Road and the Hassayampa River with approximately 30 acres irrigated.  Another headquarters for the 10X is on the state lease. $5,000,000

Dos S Inholding
Fountain Hills, Maricopa County

The Dos S is a 22.78 acre private inholding surrounded by Tonto National Forest on Sycamore Creek.  It is located just off the Beeline Highway behind a locked gate 20 miles from the Shea Boulevard & Highway 87 intersection at Fountain Hills.  Payson is 40 miles to the north. $1,025,100

Posted in Environmental Protection Agency, Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

1/3 of Idaho lawmakers ask AG Sessions to back off Bundy case

“Further exploitation of these citizens would be an affront to justice and notice to the public of prosecutorial harassment.”

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersThe current political climate, characterized by distrust of federal authorities, 80 percent of Americans distrust the federal government. That’s up from 66 percent in 2000 and 27 percent in 1958) may help explain this. It looks like the libtards may have finally pushed the common, run of the mill, deplorable to his/her breaking point.

 

By Cynthia Sewell (csewell@idahostatesman.com) via the Idaho Statesman

 

 

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual  Two failed trials is enough, some Republican legislators say.

Thirty-four Idaho lawmakers — one-third of the full combined House and Senate — sent a letter Tuesday to U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions asking him to get Nevada federal prosecutors to relax their pursuit of four Idahoans charged or convicted in connection with the 2014 Bunkerville standoff in Nevada.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View“We believe that the decision by the current U.S. attorney to Nevada to prosecute these men a third time represents disrespect for the rule of law and the jury system,” states the letter signed by 26 House members and eight Senate members, along with five retired lawmakers.

You can read the letter at this link.

On Friday, a federal judge set a trial date for Oct. 10, according to the Las Vegas Review-Journal.

The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsThe four men, Ammon Bundy, of Emmett; Eric Parker, of Hailey; Scott Drexler, of Challis; and Todd Engel, of Boundary County, were among nearly 20 defendants arrested in early 2016 as part of a nationwide roundup regarding the armed standoff against federal law enforcement officers that took place in April 2014. The federal officials tried rounding up cattle that belonged to rancher Cliven Bundy, who had refused for years to pay grazing fees.

Combat Shooter's Handbook State Rep. Dorothy Moon, R-Stanley, is the letter’s lead author. Others with their names affixed include House Majority Leader Mike Moyle; Assistant Majority Leader Brent Crane; Treasure Valley Sens. Clifford Bayer and Lori Den Hartog; and Treasure Valley Reps. Judy Boyle, Christy Perry, Brandon Hixon, Greg Chaney, Joe Palmer, James Holtzclaw, Steve Harris and Jason Monks.

“I think it is a complete injustice and a waste of taxpayer money and time to continue to go after these guys after two mistrials,” said Rep. Boyle, from Midvale.

Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute“Let it go. We are not talking about murders, robberies, druggies, rapists. It is continuing to waste the court’s time and federal taxpayers’ money. I know the federal government wants to make a point, but get over it.”

The Statesman has reached out to all lawmakers who affixed their name to the letter and will update this post with any responses.

Ammon Bundy, who was found not guilty in the Malheur, Ore., standoff case, remains in custody without bail awaiting trial for the Nevada incident. In the latter, he’s charged with conspiracy, assault and other felonies.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) Parker, who was photographed aiming his high-powered rifle at federal agents near the Bundy Ranch in Nevada — a lasting image that went worldwide — and Drexler have been tried twice in the case. In the first trial the jury deadlocked on all charges filed against the two. In the second trial, which ended Aug. 22, both were acquitted on nearly all charges. The jury deadlocked again on assault and weapons charges, which may return if prosecutors decide to make a third attempt.

Todd Engel, of Boundary County, was convicted in the first trial of obstruction and traveling across state lines in aid of extortion. His sentencing is set for Sept. 28.

The legislators asked Sessions to “have those in charge of this case end this long enduring action and set Eric Parker and Scott Drexler free, set reasonable bail for Ammon Bundy and allow Todd Engel to use his time served as total sentencing.”

“Further exploitation of these citizens would be an affront to justice and notice to the public of prosecutorial harassment.”

 

FOLLOW FLYOVER PRESS ON FACEBOOK

Check out our WebSite

Check out our e-Store

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualPlanned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual. This is the ideal squeal to A Handbook for Ranch Managers.  Although the ecological principles remain the same, what was originally known as “The Savory Grazing Method” now answers to a multitude of different names: ranching for profit, holistic management, managed grazing, mob grazing, management intensive grazing, etc. Land & Livestock International, Inc. uses “Restoration Grazing” under its “Managing the Ranch as a Business” program.” No mater what you call it, this summary and synopsis will guide you step by step through the process and teach you how to use it as it was originally intended. No more excuses for failing to complete your grazing plans.

Posted in Bundy Ranch, Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

U.S. cattle official says Trump has been good for agriculture

When it comes to agriculture, President Donald Trump is doing a crackerjack job, says a senior official with the top U.S. cattle association.

A Handbook for Ranch Managers I just saw yesterday that one of the big-time evangelical preachers has predicted that, if they do the unspeakable to Trump (impeach or assassinate), a bloody civil war will result.

If that does happen it will come down to rural vs. urban America–the old Confederate South and the West against the Yankee North East and the Left Coast. — jtl, 419

closeup of a cattle in a field
Photo: Stock

 

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual“If you listen to the media, it’s nothing but conversations about Russia, South Korea and the overall general hatred for people who just don’t like Donald Trump,” said Colin Woodall, senior vice-president of government affairs with the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association.

“What it’s not telling you is that the president while all of the showmanship is going on with the tweets and with the bad reporting of the media, he’s getting a lot of stuff done for agriculture.”

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewWoodall, CEO Kendal Frazier, and several of the association’s staff were among the 700 attendees at the Canadian Beef Industry Conference.

In a session on American-Canadian relations, Woodall said Trump has been good for the cattle business because he’s surrounded himself with lots of good people who help him get things done. He praised several of Trump’s appointments, such as the controversial choice of Scott Pruitt as the administrator for the Environmental Protection Agency — even though he sued the agency more than a dozen times while he was attorney general of Oklahoma.

Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits Combat Shooter's Handbook“Mr. Pruitt came to us and said we no longer have to fear the EPA and that he wants to work with us,” Woodall said. “That’s something we haven’t seen in the United States over several administrations, both Democrat and Republican.”

The new secretary of the interior, Ryan Zinke, rode a horse to work on his first day, which shows his commitment to agriculture while Agriculture Secretary Sonny Purdue is a veterinarian, he said.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)“He’s also a businessman so he understands the role of all of us in agriculture, but he also understands where government should and, most importantly, should not be,” he said.

Neil Gorsuch, the newest justice on the U.S. Supreme Court, has a track record of “judicial decisions that are there to protect our side of the equation against the Leonardo DiCaprios and some of the others who live in those blue (Democratic) states.”

And when it comes to keeping the border open to trade in cattle and beef, Canada can count on his organization, he added.

“We have a strong commitment to the cross-border relationship that comes from our relationship with your diplomatic staff in Washington, D.C.,” said Woodall.

He urged attendees to discount media coverage of Trump and U.S. agriculture, saying the media is under the influence of the “left coast” (Washington, Oregon and California) and “left-er coast” (New York, Maryland and New Jersey), which don’t like either the president or conventional agriculture.

But he admitted this is an unusual period in American history.

“There’s an ancient Chinese curse that says, ‘may you live in interesting times,’ and as I’m sure all of you have seen in the media, it’s interesting times down south of the border right now,” said Woodall.

But Trump’s moves to ease the regulatory burden on cattle producers have been welcome, as have his efforts to rein in the Environmental Protection Agency.

“It was going to change the nature of ranching, change the nature of agriculture, change the nature of land use in our country in a way that nobody was really prepared to handle,” he said.

He also said his organization is pushing for more trade deals and access.

“When it comes to the renegotiation of NAFTA and the talks that are going on as we speak in Washington, D.C., we want our government to do no harm to beef and cattle trade,” said Woodall. “We think they’re working and we think they work quite well — and we don’t want the president and his team to mess them up.”

His organization is also working hard to make sure that country-of-origin labelling (COOL) is not revived, he said.

“All of you sitting here know that COOL is a failed policy and a failed program that jeopardized the relationship that we talked about earlier.”

He said he hopes the NAFTA negotiations will go smoothly and proceed quickly. He added his organization did not agree with the president’s decision to pull out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership talks as it was a way to fix the problems with tariffs in Japan.

“That’s one area where we have butted heads with the president, and that’s on the issue of TPP,” said Woodall.

This article was originally published on the Alberta Farmer Express.

 

FOLLOW FLYOVER PRESS ON FACEBOOK

Check out our WebSite

Check out our e-Store

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersA Handbook for Ranch Managers.  In keeping with the “holistic” idea that the land, the livestock, the people and the money should be viewed as a single integrated whole: Part I deals with the management of the natural resources. Part II covers livestock production and Part III deals with the people and the money. Not only would this book make an excellent basic text for a university program in Ranch Management, no professional ranch manager’s reference bookshelf should be without it. It is a comprehensive reference manual for managing the working ranch. The information in the appendices and extensive bibliography alone is worth the price of the book.

You might also be interested in the supplement to this Handbook: Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual.

Posted in Government Interventionism, Uncategorized | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

Dan Love Will Not Be Prosecuted

…the government continues to protecting (sic) their own. Dan Love will get away with alleged multiple violations while the citizens sit and languish in jail over charges two juries have rejected so far.

 

So you think we live in a “free” country, do you? — jtl, 419

 

by Staff of Redoubt News

 

The U.S. Attorney’s Office for Utah declined to file criminal charges related to evidence mishandling against BLM Special Agent Daniel P. Love.

Though there were multiple scandalous allegations of breaking the law, including using his influence to get tickets to a sold-out Burning Man festival, telling an employee to delete some emails that contained bureau information requested by then-U.S. Rep. Jason Chaffetz, and telling a federal employee to take seized stones known as moqui marbles out of an evidence room so he could give them away as gifts.

The Associated Press tells us:

The report states that Love in the spring of 2016 told a federal employee to take seized stones known as moqui marbles out of an evidence room so he could give them to a contractor who had done work on the agency’s building in Salt Lake City.

The employee told investigators he had “bad feeling” about taking them from the evidence room, but followed instructions because Love was a law enforcement officer and “scary.”

Several other employees also had the stones, and one told investigators that Love was “giving them out like candy.

This is just one of the violations Love has been investigated for. Love declined to be interviewed by investigators and refused to turn over his government-issued laptops saying they’d been lost. According to the investigative report, he previously told colleagues that he planned to do this if he ever got in trouble.

Love was the Special Agent in Charge of the Bunkerville Standoff in April 2014. Though his testimony was a key part of obtaining the indictments against Cliven Bundy and multiple other defendants, Love was not called as a witness in the recent trials. Complaints of violating the defendants Sixth Amendment rights to face their accusers fell on deaf ears.

Sixth Amendment:

In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the State and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the Assistance of Counsel for his defence.

The government has stated they will continue to prosecute citizens for their being at the standoff in Bunkerville, though multiple juries have found these same citizens not guilty of most of the charges. The most recent jury deadlocked on only 6 of 40 charges, with reports of only a single holdout juror.

Currently, a third trial on the same charges is scheduled for September. Cliven Bundy, his sons Ammon and Ryan, as well as multiple other defendants, have been held for a year and a half without bail, still awaiting their day in court.

Yet, the government continues to protecting their own. Dan Love will get away with alleged multiple violations while the citizens sit and languish in jail over charges two juries have rejected so far.

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersLand & Livestock International, Inc is offering a “Free” week-long ranch management-planned grazing seminar-workshop.

What follows is a business model we have been following that has worked very well for us and for our clientele.

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualWe are seeking individual ranchers to sponsor/host workshops. The sponsor/host (and spouse or key employee) get the training at his/her ranch for no charge. This is an extra special benefit to the host as his/her land will be used for the “lab” work and hands on demonstrations. This provides a great start in the implementation of his/her program.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewIn return, he/she takes care of the logistics involved in putting on the event. This includes arranging for the venue, booking a block of rooms for lodging, arranging for meals (if any), putting out the advertising, setting and collecting the fees and so forth.

We are then responsible for putting on the workshop.

During the interim we will each keep track of our out of pocket costs (from our end, that will be mostly travel and lodging). Then, when it is all over, we both are reimbursed our out of pocket costs and split any funds remaining 50:50.

If this sounds like something you might be interested in, click here and let us know. If the link won’t work for you, copy and paste info@landandlivestockinternational.com into your browser.

Posted in Bundy Ranch, Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

FBI agent indicted in LaVoy Finicum shooting to begin trial

Does anybody wonder why we have received so little information about this side of the issue? Does anybody want to wager on whether or not this murder will ever serve a day in jail? I know…I know…dumb questions. — jtl, 419
via KATU

W. Joseph Astarita in court on Wednesday, June 28 (Courtesy Deborah Marble)

PORTLAND, Ore. – The FBI agent indicted in the shooting death of LaVoy Finicum is expected in court for trial Monday.

Agent W. Joseph Astarita is accused of lying about firing his weapon at Finicum during the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge standoff in 2016.

Investigators say Astarita did not tell them about the shots they say he fired at Finicume, but missed.

He is facing charges of making false statements and obstruction of justice.

A Handbook for Ranch Managers Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View Combat Shooter's Handbook Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) 

FOLLOW FLYOVER PRESS ON FACEBOOK

Check out our WebSite

Check out our e-Store

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View

edited by

Dr Jimmy T (Gunny) LaBaume

Is now available in both PAPERBACK and Kindle

BookCoverImageMurray N. Rothbard was the father of what some call Radical Libertarianism or Anarcho-Capitalism which Hans-Hermann Hoppe described as “Rothbard’s unique contribution to the rediscovery of property and property rights as the common foundation of both economics and political philosophy, and the systematic reconstruction and conceptual integration of modern, marginalist economics and natural-law political philosophy into a unified moral science: libertarianism.”

This book applies the principles of this “unified moral science” to environmental and natural resource management issues.

The book started out life as an assigned reading list for a university level course entitled Environmental and Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View.

As I began to prepare to teach the course, I quickly saw that there was a plethora of textbooks suitable for universal level courses dealing with environmental and natural resource economics. The only problem was that they were all based in mainstream neo-classical (or Keynesian) theory. I could find no single collection of material comprising a comprehensive treatment of environmental and natural resource economics based on Austrian Economic Theory.

However, I was able to find a large number of essays, monographs, papers delivered at professional meetings and published from a multitude of sources. This book is the result. It is composed of a collection of research reports and essays by reputable scientists, economists, and legal experts as well as private property and free market activists.

The book is organized into seven parts: I. Environmentalism: The New State Religion; II. The New State Religion Debunked; III. Introduction to Environmental and Natural Resource Economics; IV. Interventionism: Law and Regulation; V. Pollution and Recycling; VI. Property Rights: Planning, Zoning and Eminent Domain; and VII. Free Market Conservation. It also includes an elaborate Bibliography, References and Recommended Reading section including an extensive Annotated Bibliography of related and works on the subject.

The intellectual level of the individual works ranges from quite scholarly to informed editorial opinion.

FOLLOW LAND & LIVESTOCK INTERNATIONAL ON FACEBOOK

Check out our WebSite

Check out our Online Rancher Supply Store

Posted in Lavoy Finicum, Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Storm Clouds Building

The eviction of ranchers from federal lands has left deep and lasting resentment by those who understand what took place.
For the Marxist Lincoln’s agenda to be put into place, the South had to be “reconstructed.” And now the West is being “reconstructed” for essentially the same reasons. — jtl, 419
The Voices
Storm Clouds Building
The History
By Stephen L. Wilmeth via THE WESTERNER
I found myself visiting my grandmothers this morning. Of course, that was in my mind since both are long departed, but I sought their comforting memory. I needed to talk to them.
By the time we share this, the Zinke monument recommendations might be known, but I had no idea what to expect this morning. This was the day he was supposed to make his recommendations known. I was anxious. No, I was worried sick. The actual result was still anticipated as akin to the call from the doctor asking for a face-to-face on an exam report.
Just give it to me and quit fooling around!
Storm Clouds Building
I was interviewed yesterday about the future of agriculture. I found my words to be pessimistic, but there is reason. There is nothing to suggest otherwise. Our county remains on track to recruit fewer and fewer home grown stewards. I have wailed against that, but the facts remain. We can’t offer enough upside. What kids we do send off to college seem invariably resigned to off Ag tracks or the dubious if not dutiful social obligation of seeking law, marketing, academic or policy related specialties. Too few want to be at the heart of our real world, that of production agriculture.
The truth is too few of them understand the real implications.
I am not sure my grandmothers did either. Both of them were tireless workers, but there were never enough pennies around to practice anything but pinching them. One thing they could agree with was to put no trust in anything this government might promise.
They came through the Depression. In truth, their lives didn’t change much from before, during, or after it. There was no such thing as vacation nor was there any significance in “weekends”.
They worked.
I have often wondered what they thought of the government work programs and the urban visitors that came to their community during the WPA and CCC times. Talking to those who remember, the view of the results of those Depression era work programs was positive. The programs left valuable conservation structures scattered across the landscape. In fact, many of them remain the only substantive work ever installed.
The matter of government land domination, though, was something else. In private land starved southern New Mexico, the horrors of disruption and displacement became institutional.
The Voices
The eviction of ranchers from federal lands has left deep and lasting resentment by those who understand what took place. The nonsense of ranching families displacing an endemic native population in the settlement period starting in 1880 is ludicrous. The Apaches that were extant at that time remained migratory following the patterns of seasonality that yielded food and supplies. Only those pioneers that arrived prior to 1885 witnessed any suggestion of that conflict. What they endured was the raw arm of nature. Drought, the absence of markets and infrastructure, and the sheer magnitude of the work to create homes and communities were the overwhelming tasks they faced.
What they accomplished has largely been lost by first hand accounts. Even the recorded history of the era doesn’t do justice to the immensity of their efforts. The vast majority of writers were simply observers rather than participants.
Only the voices of those impacted remain, and those examples are few.
After the eviction of the Shelley family, the first family of American modern wilderness, from the Gila, the outside world was oblivious. The language in the Wilderness Act that applies to grazing and its allowance to continue where it existed at the time of the signing in 1964, though, is a direct result of their plight. They were ripped from their homeland after 60 years of which the first 15 years did not even exist with the invention of the national forest itself. For twenty eight of those years, they didn’t even have congressional representation.
Tom Shelley’s words, though, ring in infamy.
Reduced by permit from 5000 head of cattle to 700 (following the Depression and the settlement of the Peter Shelley estate) with the receipt of a letter signed by a low level official, the forest supervisor told him he had to further divide the permit or he would take action to further reduce it. So, Tom divided the permit among his four sons and himself.
So, I broke it up five ways between my self and four boys but we didn’t have enough permit to make a living on, none of us had any cattle hardly. My youngest boy had bought a small bunch just before he died so that left four boys and myself, five to share the permit. I had the 916 brand after them fellows (collection agents salvaging loan collateral following the Depression) gathered all they could but they paid off the debt but I didn’t have any cattle and no money to buy with until a friend of mine … was having to sell (a) bunch. They were in pretty bad shape. He told me if I would take them I could have them for thirty-five dollars a head and the calves were to be throwed in and Iasked him how many calves would there be, he said there would be thirty, anyway, and maybe more and he would give me five years to pay for them. So I took them, I branded forty one calves the first year so that is how I got started back in the cow business. I paid for them in three years.
The tenor of the voices was the same in the eviction of the Tularosa Basin ranchers when the government rocket men came looking for land. The only difference in their evictions was their voices were recorded in an official hearing.
Ten of them spoke. John W. Harliss of Bingam was one of the first. He struggled mightily trying to describe in a few minutes why his 50 year tenure was important.
The government might as well cut my throat as take away my ranch. Ranching is all I know.
An Indian, Charley Madrid’s presence in testimony was described as a thundercloud.
They (the White Sands ranchers) are not money lovers. They love our country, but by God you’d better pay them fairly if you take their land. We are treating (these) displaced persons worse than foreigners in the same position.
In the end, they were all gone. The Cox family, the Lees, the Lewises, the Grays, the McDonalds and hundreds more were served with evictions that summarily sent them packing. In one round, the families were given 20 days to convince the government their presence was important. Of course, they failed.
Only John Prather stood his ground. His family had been there since 1883 and the only difference between him and his Texas relations was that they owned their lands. They weren’t conditional tenants who were allowed to work their entire lives until the federal agents convened and sent them away.
John served notice he was going to die in his own home.
On August 7, 1957, the government sent three armed and embarrassed deputy U.S. marshals to evict him. They caught him in his yard before he could get to his gun. He pulled his pocket knife to defend himself.
“Just let me get my gun and we’ll square off and have at it,” the 82 year old rancher told them. “I’m ready any time you are.”
They talked for three hours, but they couldn’t convince him to concede and he couldn’t convince them to let him get his gun and settle the deal. The rest is history. Mr. Prather got 15 acres of his own private land, his house, and the agreement he could live there until he died.
The rest, the 75 years of hard labor, love, and history, was taken.
The History
That parallel history demonstrates that the ranchers of the Organ Mountain-Desert Peaks National Monument will be the next generation of ranchers evicted from their lands. The outcome of the Zinke report to the White House remains pending, but the stage has been set.
It remains dark outside. The sun won’t be up for an hour. Without the confusion of the day, my thoughts can go where I choose. The voices of my grandmothers are a stopping place. Perhaps that is the best answer to the interview and why there is nothing more fundamental and honorable than production agriculture in its most pure form. It is the people, the commitment to hard work, and the creation of something the individual alone has become responsible for that is timeless.
That is what they all said in their own words. My grandmothers, the wilderness ranchers of the Gila, their Tularosa Basin counterparts, and the current Dona Ana defenders … it is that basic.
Stephen L. Wilmeth is a rancher from southern New Mexico. “No response is likely an omen. Even if it is good, will it be too little, too late?”

Land and Livestock International, Inc. is in a position to assist the buyer in purchasing ranches like these anywhere in the Western United States and Northern Mexico. Pre – purchase services include help with due diligence, estimates of carrying capacity and potential for improvement, cash flow projections, etc. Post purchase services include everything from part time consulting to complete turn-key management.

Contact us at info@landandlivestockinternational.com or through our web site at www.landandlivestockinternational.com

Dripping Springs
Mule Creek, Grant County, New Mexico

The Dripping Springs Ranch is a highly improved working cattle ranch in a very desirable part of southwest New Mexico. Access to the Ranch from State Route 78 is excellent, and it is an easy drive to either Silver City, N. or Safford, Az. 232 deeded acres, 13,000 USFS acres, 150 AU. $2,500,000

Walking L Ranch
Wickenburg, Yavapai County

The Walking L Ranch’s 52+ square miles adjoin Wickenburg from the Hassayamapa River into the Wickenburg Mountains. The ranch originally consisted of the 10X Ranch on the south end and the Rincon Ranch on the north end.  The old Rincon Dude Ranch was added to the ranch’s Headquarters by the current owner. The ranch’s land tenure consists of deeded land, State and BLM Grazing Leases.  Topography is rolling to steep with elevation’s ranging from 2,100’ along the river to over 2,700’ on San Domingo Peak.  The ranch borders US 60 on the south side of Wickenburg.  The ranch’s deeded land is in seven non-contiguous parcels throughout the ranch.  The headquarters consists of 110.88 deeded acres on Rincon Road and the Hassayampa River with approximately 30 acres irrigated.  Another headquarters for the 10X is on the state lease. $5,000,000

Dos S Inholding
Fountain Hills, Maricopa County

The Dos S is a 22.78 acre private inholding surrounded by Tonto National Forest on Sycamore Creek.  It is located just off the Beeline Highway behind a locked gate 20 miles from the Shea Boulevard & Highway 87 intersection at Fountain Hills.  Payson is 40 miles to the north. $1,025,100

Posted in Public Lands Ranching, Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Zinke: ‘Some’ monument designations clearly outside law

“Adherence to the act’s definition of an ‘object’ and ‘smallest area compatible’ clause on some monuments were either arbitrary or likely politically motivated, or boundaries could not be supported by science or reasons of practical resource management,” the document states.
A Handbook for Ranch Managers The clowns have gone completely wild in the past. These cut backs are not nearly enough for me but it is at least a start. The drain leading from the swamp is running albeit in a trickle. — jtl, 419

 

Scott G Winterton, Deseret News

FPlanned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual  ILE – U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke takes a horseback ride in the Bears Ears National Monument with local and state representatives on Tuesday, May 9, 2017. Zinke released an executive summary of his findings from a 120-day review of 27 national monuments. The report says some monument designations clearly stretched definitions in the 1906 Antiquities Law, but it lacks specifics.

 

SALT LAKE CITY — A summary of Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke’s draft monument review released Thursday notes that some monuments’ adherence to definitions in the Antiquities Act were either arbitrary or politically motivated, lacked a basis in science or were unsupported by practical resource management.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewThe executive summary made public is part of a more detailed report of recommendations delivered to the White House as part of a 120-day review of national monuments that began in April.

The summary did not provide specifics of recommendations, which was blasted by critics of the review that they assert is illegal and attacks some of the country’s most important landscapes.

But Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, who spoke with Zinke by phone Wednesday to get more details, said he “feels good” about those recommendations that remain under wrap.

“I appreciate Secretary Zinke’s thorough and thoughtful review, and the efforts he made to ensure relevant stakeholders, particularly those in San Juan, Kane and Garfield counties, had an opportunity to be heard,” he said in a statement released Thursday. “I look forward to assisting in every way possible as additional details about the future of Utah’s monuments are made public.”

Combat Shooter's Handbook Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsZinke pared the initial list of 27 monuments to 21, but two contentious designations in Utah — Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante — remained.

The review is the result of an executive order issued by President Donald Trump after complaints by monument critics that past presidential declarations fell outside the scope of the 1906 Antiquities Act and were more about politics than meaningful conservation.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)Zinke told the Associated Press earlier Thursday that his executive summary recommends changes to a “handful of monuments,” and that no past designations would be rescinded altogether, including the Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante national monuments.

Additionally, Rep. Chris Stewart, R-Utah, said Zinke’s executive summary is centered on broad principles and tenets of the Antiquities Act, which was passed in response to cultural “antiquities” at risk of being vandalized.

Rep. Rob Bishop, R-Utah, said in a teleconference Thursday that he believes forthcoming monument recommendations will be accompanied by details of why the boundaries were reduced in context with the provisions of the Antiquities Act.

That law spells out that land can be set aside by a U.S. presidential declaration to protect cultural resources, but in the “smallest area compatible” to achieve the objects’ protections.

Zinke’s summary said some designations clearly fell outside that federal law.

“Adherence to the act’s definition of an ‘object’ and ‘smallest area compatible’ clause on some monuments were either arbitrary or likely politically motivated, or boundaries could not be supported by science or reasons of practical resource management,” the document states.

“Despite the apparent lack of adherence to the purpose of the act, some monuments reflect a long public debate process and are largely settled and strongly supported by the local community,” according to the summary.

Other monuments remain controversial, the report states, and designations overlap federal land designations already in place or contain signficant private property within their boundaries.

“No president should use the authority under the Antiquities Act to restrict public access, prevent hunting and fishing, burden private land, or eliminate traditional land uses, unless such action is needed to protect the object,” Zinke said in a prepared statement.

“The recommendations I sent to the president on national monuments will maintain federal ownership of all federal land and protect the land under federal environmental regulations, and also provide a much-needed change for the local communities who border and rely on these lands for hunting and fishing, economic development, traditional uses and recreation.”

Monument supporters blasted the absence of specific recommendations Thursday.

“This secrecy shows the Trump administration knows their attack on national monuments is wildly unpopular,” said Jennifer Rokala, executive director of the Center for Western Priorities. “If Secretary Zinke expects Americans to be thankful because he wants to merely erase large chunks of national monuments instead of eliminating them entirely, he is badly mistaken.”

The Natural Resources Defense Council, another environmental organization, said the pending recommendations threaten America’s public lands and waterways with “industrial ravage and ruin.”

“Our laws grant presidents the power to protect special places for all time. No president, though, has the right to take public waters and lands away from us for the sake of industrial ravage and ruin,” said the council’s Rhea Suh.

Scott Groene, executive director of the Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance, said the Trump administration’s intention of shrinking some of the monuments flies in the face of public will.

“It’s outrageous that after 99 percent of the more than 2.8 million comments received by the secretary supported keeping our monuments protected, Secretary Zinke is still recommending the president illegally attack our national treasures. President Trump should throw this report away.”

Opponents to any changes in monument designations have choreographed an extensive public information and advertising campaign aimed at eliciting support for monuments to remain intact, including full-page ads taken out Thursday in both Salt Lake City newspapers by the Conservation Lands Foundation.

Critics contend any reduction in monument boundaries is illegal, but Zinke’s letter points out existing monument boundaries have been modified by previous presidents 18 times, “and there is no doubt that President Trump has the authority to review and consider recommendations to modify or add a monument.”

Bishop, during his teleconference, said the review was an important path to foster more dialogue over the flawed process used to designate national monuments.

He and other members of Utah’s congressional delegation have been universal in their condemnation of former President Barack Obama’s designation of Bears Ears last December and the way Grand Staircase was designated in 1996.

Utah Gov. Gary Herbert said he believes Utah’s two most recent monument designations — Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante — exceed the scope of the Antiquities Act.

“It is my hope that the president will carefully study the secretary’s recommendations to narrow the application of the Antiquities Act. If the president decides to modify current monuments, I trust the stakeholders in our public land debates will work with Congress in good faith to pass legislation to clarify controversial public land use regulations,” Herbert said.

Advertising and social media campaigns ratcheting support of status quo for Bears Ears and other national monuments assert the review is designed to unleash the extractive industry on sensitive lands or sell off or privatize public lands that should be kept in “public hands.”

Zinke said none of his recommendations change the federal land ownership and the narrative that those lands will be sold or privatized is “false.”

But the remaining uncertainty over certain monuments’ destinies is not setting well with groups across the country.

“These are our public lands, and the public deserves to know what the administration plans to do with them,” says Whit Fosburgh, president and CEO of the Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership.

“These recommendations have the potential to impact the future of world-class hunting and fishing on some of America’s finest public lands and set a precedent for the future status of all national monuments, even those created by Theodore Roosevelt in 1906 — but we won’t know until the results of this public process are made public.”

Fosburgh said fishing and hunting is allowed in 22 of the 27 monuments under initial review.

In San Juan County — home to the 1.35 million-acre Bears Ears Monument — Commissioner Phil Lyman said the campaign over the sprawling landscape has been ugly, and it didn’t need to be.

“If they would do these things with a little common sense and drop the politics, a national monument should be an honor to a community; it means that on a national level they recognize something that we think is really fantastic and beautiful,” Lyman told KSL Newsradio’s “The Doug Wright Show.”

 

FOLLOW FLYOVER PRESS ON FACEBOOK

Check out our WebSite

Check out our e-Store

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualPlanned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual. This is the ideal squeal to A Handbook for Ranch Managers.  Although the ecological principles remain the same, what was originally known as “The Savory Grazing Method” now answers to a multitude of different names: ranching for profit, holistic management, managed grazing, mob grazing, management intensive grazing, etc. Land & Livestock International, Inc. uses “Restoration Grazing” under its “Managing the Ranch as a Business” program.” No mater what you call it, this summary and synopsis will guide you step by step through the process and teach you how to use it as it was originally intended. No more excuses for failing to complete your grazing plans.

Posted in National Monuments, Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Bishop Statement on Secretary Zinke’s National Monument Review

via THE WESTERNER

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: August 24, 2017
CONTACT: Parish Braden, Molly Block, Katie Schoettler (202) 226-9019

Washington, D.C. – Today, Chairman Rob Bishop (R-UT) issued the following statement in reaction to Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke’s final review of national monument designations under the Antiquities Act (Act):

“I am encouraged by the recommendations to revise previous designations that were inconsistent with the law and outside the Act’s size limitations. It is my hope that President Trump takes this opportunity to begin realigning uses of the law with its intended purpose. It’s also incumbent on Congress to pursue reforms to the Act that ensure it is being used to protect antiquities while providing meaningful local input in the designation process and reasonable continued public access to these iconic areas. Ultimately, only Congress can restore integrity to this law and prevent future abuses.”

A Handbook for Ranch Managers Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View  Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits Combat Shooter's Handbook

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)

FOLLOW FLYOVER PRESS ON FACEBOOK

Check out our WebSite

Check out our e-Store

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersA Handbook for Ranch Managers.  In keeping with the “holistic” idea that the land, the livestock, the people and the money should be viewed as a single integrated whole: Part I deals with the management of the natural resources. Part II covers livestock production and Part III deals with the people and the money. Not only would this book make an excellent basic text for a university program in Ranch Management, no professional ranch manager’s reference bookshelf should be without it. It is a comprehensive reference manual for managing the working ranch. The information in the appendices and extensive bibliography alone is worth the price of the book.

You might also be interested in the supplement to this Handbook: Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual.

 

Posted in National Monuments, Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Jury says ‘no thanks’ to tyranny in Bundy standoff case

Still, the government’s inability to secure convictions against any participants on conspiracy charges this week threatens to dismantle future federal efforts to prosecute participants in the 2014 standoff.

 

Cliven Bundy and his sons Ammon and Ryan are the next fish in the barrel We’ll see.

 

via Personal Liberty

A jury this week handed an embarrassing defeat to federal prosecutors working to imprison four men the government accused of taking up arms against federal agents during the 2014 Bundy Ranch standoff.

The Arizona Republic provided details on the Las Vegas federal jury’s decision on Tuesday:

Richard Lovelien of Oklahoma and Steven Stewart of Idaho were acquitted on all counts and walked out of court Tuesday night free after spending more than a year in prison.

“Both Ricky and I were teary-eyed,” Las Vegas defense lawyer Shawn Perez said of the verdict, “I was shaking … I have gotten not-guilty verdicts before, but this was really special to me.”

Two other defendants, Eric Parker and O. Scott Drexler, both of Idaho, were acquitted on the most serious charges of conspiracy and extortion, but jurors failed to reach unanimous verdicts on weapons and assault charges.

Both men could be allowed to go free after a detention hearing scheduled Wednesday morning. The court ordered both defendants to be released to a halfway house until Wednesday’s hearing.

“(Parker) is getting released as we speak,” Las Vegas defense lawyer Jess Marchese said Tuesday night. “He’s ecstatic.”

After the jury’s decision, U.S. District Court Judge Gloria Navarro called for the hearing without any motions from the defense, Marchese said. “We didn’t bring it up,” he said.

Federal prosecutors had little to say about the verdicts.

This isn’t the first time a jury has declined to convict men involved in the standoff of conspiracy, extortion, assault and obstruction for aiding Bundy in fending off federal agents attempting to steal his cattle.

In April, Judge Gloria Navarro declared a mistrial after a jury deadlocked, unable to determine whether charges against Lovelien, Stewart, Parker and Drexler were legitimate.

During that trial, two other defendants were found guilty of various charges.

Gregory Burleson, 53, was convicted of charges, including: threatening and assaulting a federal agent, brandishing a weapon while committing a violent crime, obstruction of justice and traveling across state lines in aid of extortion.

Burleson’s conviction came after undercover FBI agents posing as documentary filmmakers caught him on camera saying he went to the Bundy Ranch with the intention to kill federal agents acting outside their constitutional authority.

Here’s some of the footage agents gathered via a clip from PBS’s Frontline:

Burleson was sentenced to 68 years in prison.

Fellow protestor Todd Engel was also convicted of obstruction of justice and interstate travel in aid of extortion during the April trial. His sentencing hearing is set for September.

Still, the government’s inability to secure convictions against any participants on conspiracy charges this week threatens to dismantle future federal efforts to prosecute participants in the 2014 standoff.

The next scheduled trial involving the standoff will include rancher Cliven Bundy, along with his sons Ammon and Ryan.

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersLand & Livestock International, Inc is offering a “Free” week-long ranch management-planned grazing seminar-workshop.

What follows is a business model we have been following that has worked very well for us and for our clientele.

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualWe are seeking individual ranchers to sponsor/host workshops. The sponsor/host (and spouse or key employee) get the training at his/her ranch for no charge. This is an extra special benefit to the host as his/her land will be used for the “lab” work and hands on demonstrations. This provides a great start in the implementation of his/her program.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewIn return, he/she takes care of the logistics involved in putting on the event. This includes arranging for the venue, booking a block of rooms for lodging, arranging for meals (if any), putting out the advertising, setting and collecting the fees and so forth.

We are then responsible for putting on the workshop.

During the interim we will each keep track of our out of pocket costs (from our end, that will be mostly travel and lodging). Then, when it is all over, we both are reimbursed our out of pocket costs and split any funds remaining 50:50.

If this sounds like something you might be interested in, click here and let us know. If the link won’t work for you, copy and paste info@landandlivestockinternational.com into your browser.

Posted in Bundy Ranch, Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Leave a comment