What the Supreme Court Got Wrong in Its Gay-Wedding Cake Decision

All human rights are also property rights. If I own a lunch counter and you tell me who I can or can not serve, you have taken a property right. The freedom of speech and of the press are property rights–you have to have a place to stand in order to speak. You must own a printing press in order to enjoy freedom of the press. Etc.

One of the best examples of the failure of the legal system to recognize this is the “fire in a crowded theater” case. In this case SCOTUS significantly weakened the “freedom of speech” in that they thought they had found an exception.
That would not have been the case had they couched it in terms of private property rights. Whose property is violated by yelling “fire” in a theater? — The theater owner and the patrons. — jtl, 419

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Unfortunately, the Supreme Court’s ruling does not address the central problem with “anti-discrimination” laws and other “public accommodation” requirements… At their core, such laws and regulations are fundamentally based on eliminating the private property rights of business owners who ought to be free to dispose of their property as they see fit.

The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsAll human rights are also property rights. If I own a lunch counter and you tell me who I can or can not serve, you have taken a property right. The freedom of speech and of the press are property rights–you have to have a place to stand in order to speak. You must own a printing press in order to enjoy freedom of the press. Etc.

One of the best examples of the failure of the legal system to recognize this is the “fire in a crowded theater” case. In this case SCOTUS significantly weakened the “freedom…

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How an Australian Ranch Uses Cattle to Restore Soil

via Chris Gill  and the Circle Ranch

Meet Glenn Morris, General Manager of Figtrees Organic Farms, producers and marketers of award winning organic beef from the award winning properties ‘Wilton Park’ in New South Wales, Australia. Glenn has spent more than two decades observing, studying and thoughtfully managing the diverse ecosystems in his care. His keen eye led him to question traditional management practices, search for sustainable solutions and put them into practice. Glenn is on the ground ‘walking the talk’ with a blend of biological and organic farming principles, combined with Holistic Management practices.

The methods he describes will work anywhere.

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersLand & Livestock International, Inc is offering a “Free” week-long ranch management-planned grazing seminar-workshop.

What follows is a business model we have been following that has worked very well for us and for our clientele.

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualWe are seeking individual ranchers to sponsor/host workshops . The sponsor/host (and spouse or key employee) get the training at his/her ranch for no charge. This is an extra special benefit to the host as his/her land will be used for the “lab” work and hands on demonstrations. This provides a great start in the implementation of his/her program.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewIn return, he/she takes care of the logistics involved in putting on the event. This includes arranging for the venue, booking a block of rooms for lodging, arranging for meals (if any), putting out the advertising, setting and collecting the fees and so forth.

We are then responsible for putting on the workshop.

During the interim we will each keep track of our out of pocket costs (from our end, that will be mostly travel and lodging). Then, when it is all over, we both are reimbursed our out of pocket costs and split any funds remaining 50:50.

If this sounds like something you might be interested in, click here and let us know. If the link won’t work for you, copy and paste info@landandlivestockinternational.com into your browser.

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Western David Fights Environmental Goliath in Rural Utah

President Trump was right to review abuses of the Antiquities Act of 1906.  No one was surprised the review found Clinton and Obama violated the law, single-mindedly pursued “environmental legacies,” and kowtowed shamelessly to demands by radical environmental groups.  Now however, rural Utah is fighting back on its way to the Supreme Court.
And we wish them the best of luck. — jtl, 419
William Perry Pendley


A Handbook for Ranch Managers

It is a cliché that the main stream media get much wrong, infuse news with opinions, and—what they do not get wrong or slant—they miss entirely.

Nonetheless, it is nothing short of amazing they failed to report the most outsized match since Goliath, the Philistine champion, sneered contemptuously at ruddy-faced David, the shepherd boy.  After all, when three poor rural counties in a remote corner of a western state sue a who’s who of the world’s most powerful organizations and a billion-dollar corporation, that is news!
Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualThat was not the media’s reaction when those groups, the corporation, and a few American Indian tribes filed federal lawsuits against President Donald J. Trump.
When those lawsuits were filed reporters—who love every lawsuit, regardless of legal merit, filed against Trump—heaped on the praise.  Another reason they did so was the suits challenged President Trump’s reductions of two national monuments in Utah created (illegally say most experts) by President Clinton in 1996 and President Obama in 2016 at the behest of environmental groups, media darlings all.  Finally, the bicoastal media elite’s distain for—when they think of us at all—fly-over-country, the Mountain West, and rural Utah is positively breathtaking.
The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsThere is no excusing, however, the failure of the media to reveal the real target of the lawsuits, that is, some of the hardest working, poorest, and longest suffering descendants of some of the West’s oldest families:  the men, women, and children of Garfield, Kane, and San Juan Counties.  After all, the lawsuits demand they stop ranching and farming, logging and mining, searching for sources of energy, and recreating on the vast, wide-open federal lands they and their ancestors have used, in full compliance with federal law, for many generations.
Combat Shooter's Handbook What is it they are to do instead?  Pump gas, pull espressos, and fluff duvets or
otherwise serve the tourists who, although promised after the Clinton shut down of 1.9 million acres in 1996, never came.  Even if they had, as western third-generation logger Bruce Vincent said when a similar disaster befell his tiny town, “You have to sell a lot of t-shirts to replace a job in the mill.”  Just who are these Goliaths that so denigrate rural Utahns?
Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps InstituteThe Natural Resources Defense Council, as of 2015, had revenue of $130 million and assets of three times that amount.  The Sierra Club the same year raised nearly $110 million with assets of $82 million.  That year, the National Trust for Historic Preservation raised nearly $52 million and boasted assets of nearly $296 million.  Who knows how much they are worth today?  All totaled, they and the groups allied with them in their lawsuits raised $390 million for the latest year available and bragged of assets of more than $855 million.  At the head of the parade is the most admirable, self-made, billionaire owner of Patagonia, a self-described “dirtbag” who once spent over 200 nights a year sleeping outdoors.
Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewSadly, he and the groups with which he is allied think all should live his lifestyle.
As outrageous as is the demand by the multi-million-dollar environmental groups and the billionaire ascetic for the future of the families of rural Utah is the legal holding they want federal courts to adopt:  No president’s actions may be reversed by a future president!  It sounds like The Ten Commandments when Pharaoh shouts:  “So let it be written.  So let it be done.”  But presidents—no matter how exalted by the media—are not pharaohs; nothing is written in stone—even the Constitution can be amended; and illegal acts must be rectified.The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)
President Trump was right to review abuses of the Antiquities Act of 1906.  No one was surprised the review found Clinton and Obama violated the law, single-mindedly pursued “environmental legacies,” and kowtowed shamelessly to demands by radical environmental groups.  Now however, rural Utah is fighting back on its way to the Supreme Court.

For more information:  Wilderness Society v. Trump

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Combat Shooter's Handbook Combat Shooter’s Handbook. Call for a pizza, a cop, and an  ambulance and see which one arrives first. So, who does that leave to protect you, your life, property and family? The one and only answer is: YOU This Handbook is intended to help you exercise that right and meet that responsibility. Available in both paperback and Kindle versions.

 

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Is America’s Racial Divide Permanent?

“There is a natural disgust in the minds of nearly all white people to the idea of indiscriminate amalgamation of the white and black races … A separation of the races is the only perfect preventive of amalgamation, but as an immediate separation is impossible, the next best thing is to keep them apart where they are not already together.” — Dishonest Abraham Lincoln

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On reading this, the terms “Orwellian” and “re-education camp” come to mind.

The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits“There is a natural disgust in the minds of nearly all white people to the idea of indiscriminate amalgamation of the white and black races … A separation of the races is the only perfect preventive of amalgamation, but as an immediate separation is impossible, the next best thing is to keep them apart where they are not already together.” — Dishonest Abraham Lincoln

By Patrick J. Buchanan

Combat Shooter's HandbookFor Roseanne Barr, star of ABC’s hit show “Roseanne,” there would be no appeal. When her tweet hit, she was gone.

“Roseanne’s Twitter statement, is abhorrent, repugnant and inconsistent with our values, and we have decided to cancel her show,” declaimed Channing Dungey, the black president of ABC Entertainment.

Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps InstituteTargeting Valerie Jarrett, a confidante and aide of President Barack Obama, Roseanne had tweeted: If the “muslim brotherhood & the planet…

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Classical Liberalism vs. Progressive Liberalism

When I tell friends (and mostly new acquaintances) that I am a “Liberal” they are usually shocked. I usually hear somebody mumble “get a rope.” So, I am quick to explain:

You see, I am a “classical” liberal (just like Thomas Jefferson and Adam Smith)–i.e. the small government, individual liberty guys. This is just the opposite of what the term has become nowadays–“liberals” are the tax and spend, big government people.

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The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsWhen I tell friends (and mostly new acquaintances) that I am a “Liberal” they are usually shocked. I usually hear somebody mumble “get a rope.” So, I am quick to explain: 
You see, I am a “classical” liberal (just like Thomas Jefferson and Adam Smith)–i.e. the small government, individual liberty guys. This is just the opposite of what the term has become nowadays–“liberals” are the tax and spend, big government people. 

The next question us usually, “What happened?” My answer is usually, the socialists stole the term. This article is much more detailed and much better explained. Enjoy.  — jtl, 419

Classical Liberalism vs. Progressive Liberalism

Combat Shooter's Handbook

from Being Classically Liberal

Since its emergence in the 19th century, classical liberalism has principally advocated that every individual has the natural rights to life, liberty, and property, and that the function of government is to protect these rights. As the result of their belief in…

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Wanted: Students to ride horses while reading the Great Books

 “Being given dominion over an irrational animal gives you a unique way to experience creation,” says Sheehan.

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersWhen it comes to ways of leaving this life, I’m with Kenny Rogers and his lyric in “The Gambler.” “The best that you can hope for is to die in your sleep.” But…

if I was pressured to choose another alternative,  it would be to simply drop dead out of the saddle while watching a sunrise through a horses ears. — jtl, 419

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual The lost art of horsemanship is alive and well Wyoming Catholic College.

The list of “great books” of Western literature that students read at Wyoming Catholic College includes Homer’s Iliad, in which the hero Achilles has a conversation with his horses before heading off to battle. Achilles complains that it’s their fault his friend Patroklos has been killed in battle, and one horse replies that Patroklos’ death is actually the fault of Apollo and destiny, and that Achilles, too, will one day die in battle. Achilles then shouts out his war cry and heads off to war.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewLorine Sheehan, a 2014 graduate from Wyoming Catholic who now heads its Equestrian Program, says that when students have direct physical contact with a horse it gives them a new perspective of the bond that can develop between a human and a horse, which ties back into the curriculum, “illustrat[ing] how important horses were to Achilles.”

Wyoming Catholic College is unique among Catholic institutions in that it requires students to take a semester class in horsemanship, regardless of their level of experience in riding. Students are provided the opportunity, Sheehan says, to be paired with a particular horse that matches their personality so that they may “learn to communicate with, teach and be taught by them.”

Combat Shooter's Handbook Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits“Being given dominion over an irrational animal gives you a unique way to experience creation,” says Sheehan.

For three hours once a week, students travel to a nearby ranch and learn horse characteristics, basic horse care and practice riding under the watchful eye of an instructor. As students progress, they go on day rides and enjoy the beauty of the landscape surrounding the college. Students may see herds of deer, elk or antelope; there is also an eagle that lives on a nearby mountain that students hope to spot. Students are also introduced to herding cattle in a rodeo arena, and while on trail may help round up strays for ranchers who live nearby.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1) The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)   A private, four-year institution located in Lander, Wyoming, Wyoming Catholic College was founded in 2007 and has a student body of 177. The school’s mission includes “the active remaking of culture through the recovery of the Western intellectual tradition.” Students enjoy an active Catholic spiritual life including daily Mass and confession. The college curriculum includes outdoor activities, such as the horsemanship program, which make use of the beautiful and vast country that surrounds the college.

Sheehan explained that the college seeks to form the mind, body and spirit of each student. The equestrian program, she continued, “fits under the body category. We get our students outside, enjoying leisure in an active but non-stressful way.”

The equestrian program is also “a way for students to understand the physical sense of where we are meant to be in relation to nature, caring for it as good stewards.”

Since horses are sensitive to moods, Sheehan says, a student who is upset or excited must learn “to master his emotions. If you’re having a bad day, you have to move on. If you’re excited, you have to control that energy,” she says.

Alaska’s Michaela Houser, 21, who will be a senior at Wyoming Catholic in the fall, had little riding experience starting out, but was excited to try it. Her excitement gave way to fear, however, as she realized that the horse “is a big animal, with a mind of its own.” After two semesters of learning the basics of horsemanship, however, riding a horse has become an “amazing experience, and I want to be riding out there all the time.”

Horses, Houser believes, can make a connection with people, and they give their riders “an opportunity to learn about themselves.” Since a rider must communicate with a horse in a nonverbal way, it can make the rider more attuned to his or her own nonverbal modes of connecting. Hence, when Houser is around other people, she’s become more aware of the nonverbal communication she gives and “has become more effective in communicating with others.”

Houser admits to falling off the horses a few times, but dutifully followed the time-tested rule: “When you fall off a horse, get right back up in the saddle.”

While it’s common for those unfamiliar with horses to be intimidated by the program, Sheehan says she’s seen many students blossom into accomplished horsemen and women. “You may go into the program scared, but you soon learn there is no reason to be,” she says. “The horses will come to understand and respond to you. They take you to the edge of your limits, but not beyond.”

Wyoming is a fitting location for a horsemanship program, as horses played a central role in the settlement of the West. In fact, the area surrounding the City of Lander is still dotted by numerous ranches that welcome tourists in search of equestrian adventures.

Environmental and Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View

edited by

Dr Jimmy T (Gunny) LaBaume

Is now available in both PAPERBACK and Kindle

BookCoverImageMurray N. Rothbard was the father of what some call Radical Libertarianism or Anarcho-Capitalism which Hans-Hermann Hoppe described as “Rothbard’s unique contribution to the rediscovery of property and property rights as the common foundation of both economics and political philosophy, and the systematic reconstruction and conceptual integration of modern, marginalist economics and natural-law political philosophy into a unified moral science: libertarianism.”

This book applies the principles of this “unified moral science” to environmental and natural resource management issues.

The book started out life as an assigned reading list for a university level course entitled Environmental and Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View.

As I began to prepare to teach the course, I quickly saw that there was a plethora of textbooks suitable for universal level courses dealing with environmental and natural resource economics. The only problem was that they were all based in mainstream neo-classical (or Keynesian) theory. I could find no single collection of material comprising a comprehensive treatment of environmental and natural resource economics based on Austrian Economic Theory.

However, I was able to find a large number of essays, monographs, papers delivered at professional meetings and published from a multitude of sources. This book is the result. It is composed of a collection of research reports and essays by reputable scientists, economists, and legal experts as well as private property and free market activists.

The book is organized into seven parts: I. Environmentalism: The New State Religion; II. The New State Religion Debunked; III. Introduction to Environmental and Natural Resource Economics; IV. Interventionism: Law and Regulation; V. Pollution and Recycling; VI. Property Rights: Planning, Zoning and Eminent Domain; and VII. Free Market Conservation. It also includes an elaborate Bibliography, References and Recommended Reading section including an extensive Annotated Bibliography of related and works on the subject.

The intellectual level of the individual works ranges from quite scholarly to informed editorial opinion.

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Give Susette Kelo Her Land Back

Here’s the rub. Thirteen years after the Kelo decision, after all the condemning and evicting and bulldozing, nothing has been built on the land that was taken. Basically, an entire neighborhood was erased in vain. Meantime, all those vacant lots have become New London’s scarlet letter….
A Handbook for Ranch Managers Will we ever get enough? Probably not. It’s what the feminization of the American male has been about all along. — jtl, 419
Former site of Susette Kelo's house. May 2014. Photo by Ilya Somin.
Former site of Susette Kelo’s house. May 2014. Photo by Ilya Somin. 

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual   Jeff Benedict is a prominent reporter and author of Little Pink House, an excellent journalistic account of the events leading up to Kelo v. City of New London, the controversial 2005 Supreme Court decision in which the justices ruled that it is permissible for the government to take homes and other property in order to transfer it to new private owners for purposes of promoting “economic development.” His book was recently made into a powerful movie about the case (which I reviewed here). In a recent op ed in The Day (the local paper in New London, the city where the Kelo takings occurred), Benedict proposes that New London return at least some of the land taken from Susette Kelo and her neighbors to the original owners:

It was 20 years ago this month that the City Council authorized the New London Development Corporation to prepare a plan to acquire and redevelop 90 acres on the Fort Trumbull peninsula where the Thames River joins Long Island Sound….

But after acquiring nearly all of the targeted 90 acres, the city and the NLDC took an all-or-nothing approach to the few remaining lots owned by Susette Kelo, where sat her little pink house, and six neighbors. The prospect of jobs and increased tax revenues, the city argued, were “public benefits” worthy of using eminent domain.

In June 2005, by a 5-4 vote, the U.S. Supreme Court agreed.

Here’s the rub. Thirteen years after the Kelo decision, after all the condemning and evicting and bulldozing, nothing has been built on the land that was taken. Basically, an entire neighborhood was erased in vain. Meantime, all those vacant lots have become New London’s scarlet letter….

Thirteen years of inertia is long enough. For the sake of all parties – the city, the state, and the residents who were displaced – it’s time to turn the page and write an epilogue with a far more redeeming outcome…

A good starting point might be to allow the marketplace to decide what makes sense for the barren land that remains rather than trying to continue driving this redevelopment effort from city hall….

But before the city can expect to attract developers and investors with the wherewithal to transform the peninsula, the city must first shed its scarlet letter. The best place to start is by carving out seven contiguous residential building lots – perhaps right along East Street where the pink house once stood – and offering to convey them to Susette Kelo and her six evicted neighbors. The current mayor and City Council are not responsible for the mistakes of the past. But they have the chance to be game changers by formally apologizing and reconciling with the city’s displaced residents.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewAs Benedict points out, the development plan that led to the Kelo takings fell through, and the land remains essentially empty to this day. It would be wrong to say that the property is completely unused. As I described in The Grasping Hand, my own book about the case (which focuses more on the legal and policy issues than Benedict’s), a colony of feral cats have taken up residence on the site. Some enterprising locals have built little cat shelters for them.

Improvised feral cat shelter near the former site of Susette Kelo's house. May 2014. Photo by Ilya Somin.

Improvised feral cat shelter near the former site of Susette Kelo’s house. May 2014. Photo by Ilya Somin. 

Though it might discomfit the feral cats, Benedict’s proposal has much to recommend it. As he explains, it could help effect reconciliation between the city and displaced residents, and potentially make it possible to finally find a productive use for the condemned property.

Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute In the course of conducting research for my book, I interviewed Susette Kelo and other homeowners displaced by the Kelo takings. Most were still very angry about their mistreatment by the City and the New London Development Corporation – not just because of the ultimate outcome of the case, but also because of the extensive harassment they were subjected to in order to get them to sell their land “voluntarily.” The compensation they eventually received was not enough to offset suffering endured over a period of several years.

The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits Many of the displaced former residents still live in the region. Benedict reports that Susette Kelo is open to potentially moving back to New London if the City were to return the site of her famous “little pink house,” which became a nationally known symbol of the case. I do not know if this is true of the other plaintiffs in the case. But I think many might at least appreciate the conciliatory gesture Benedict advocates. Even if the displaced owners chose not to return after getting their land back, they could potentially sell it to developers or other businesses who could build new homes on the site or find some other productive use for it. At the very least, the outcome is likely to be better than the experience of the last thirteen years, during which this attractive and potentially valuable land has largely gone to waste.

Combat Shooter's HandbookWhile the Kelo takings were a tragedy for the City of New London and the displaced homeowners, the massive backlash generated by the Supreme Court decision did lead to valuable – even if incomplete – reforms in many states. It also broke the seeming consensus in favor of a broad view of “public use,” under which most lawyers and judges believed the Constitution allows the government to take property for almost any reason it wants. Several state supreme courts have repudiated Kelo as a guide to the interpretation of their state constitutions’ public use clauses, thereby providing stronger protection for property rights than currently mandated by the federal courts’ interpretation of the Fifth Amendment. The Supreme Court might well overrule or limit Kelo in a future decision.

In the meantime, Benedict’s proposal can potentially help the participants in the case find some closure, and allow the city to move forward. We can also hope that other communities seeking to promote development will learn from New London’s experience, and come to understand that the better way to increase economic growth is to respect property rights and work with local residents, rather than forcibly displacing them.

 

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You might also be interested in the supplement to this Handbook: Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual.

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What Is America’s Cause in the World Today? By Patrick J. Buchanan

We are way too far beyond that, Pat. And the juvenile, nonsensical flap over Rossanne Barr’s Tweet is the latest proof. Separation is our only hope. Think secession! — jtl, 419

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And when Vladimir Putin and Belarus’ Alexander Lukashenko are standing up for traditional values against Western cultural elites, the East-West struggle has lost its moral clarity… Democracy crusading is out of style as the free elections we have demanded have produced Hamas, Hezbollah, the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt, Muqtada al-Sadr in Iraq, and nationalists, populists and autocrats from Asia to the Middle East to Europe… Perhaps our mission is to defend and protect what is vital to us, to stay out of foreign wars where our critical interests are not imperiled, and to reunite our divided and disputatious republic — if we are not too far beyond that.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)We are way too far beyond that, Pat. And the juvenile, nonsensical flap over Rossanne Barr’s Tweet  is the latest proof.  Separation is our only hope. Think secession! — jtl, 419

by Patrick J. Buchanan via LewRockwell.com

  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2)After being sworn in…

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Total Gun Confiscation Genie Can’t Be Put Back in Bottle

The debate is over. We are awake and aware of what your “intelligent compromise” has done for us. The next step smells like cordite. — jtl, 419

Flyover-Press.com

We have no interest in meeting you or any other useful idiot apparatchik so that you can incrementally infringe rights you have no claim to. We know the end game and we’re ceding no ground from which to launch the next  incursion. That would make as much sense as throwing a scrap of flesh to a circling pack of hyenas and expecting it to sate them and persuade them to be on their way.
Combat Shooter's HandbookThe debate is over. We are awake and aware of what your “intelligent compromise” has done for us. The next step smells like cordite.  — jtl, 419

The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits

A Handbook for Ranch Managers Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual

If he didn’t file police reports, I call BS.

Nowhere does he quote anyone actually saying they are going to do him harm, and even if he did it would be on him to prove he didn’t make it up or it didn’t come from a fellow “progressive”…

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Wild horses: Are they being managed to extinction?

Please carefully research and consider what organizations you are supporting and what they are doing with your donation dollars. The very survival of our precious wild horses depends upon your love and good judgment.
A Handbook for Ranch ManagersI think I’m gonna cry (Sarcasm in case you didn’t notice). Actually, most of this is little more than far left, quivering lipped, collectivist propaganda.

As long as the land and the animals are claimed by the government (BLM mostly) the problem will persist.

Make the land and the animals private property and re-open the slaughter plants free of regulation of any kind and, as if by magic, the problem will self fix. — jtl, 419

 Wild horses in the Owyhee herd management area in Nevada.
Wild horses in the Owyhee herd management area in Nevada. © BLM

 

by via horsetalk.co.nz

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual  What will we do when the wild horses are no more? And what impact might that have on all the interdependent species and ecosystems, as well as domestic horses breeds?

That is a question that must be addressed if wild horses continue to be removed from the ranges essentially based upon how they look. Some wild horses who may appear ‘ugly’ on the outside to some, but may carry key genes that could be critical to the long-term survival of the equine species.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewScience does not have all the answers today, and any such meddling by humans may result in a genetic bottleneck.

As far as preserving the very best wild horses, no man can do the same job that is accomplished by the continuous process of natural selection inside a natural ecosystem. There are hundreds of stressors that affect wild horses in the true wilderness that strengthen their genetic lines and none of those involves people who think they know which horses are the best.

Even if we applied extensive genetic testing of wild horses, we still know very little about which genes (and alleles) are responsible for resilience to a myriad of past, present and potentially fatal future diseases and environmental conditions.

Wild horses being held at the BLM's facility in Burns, Oregon. Photo: Mike Lorden
Wild horses being held at the BLM’s facility in Burns, Oregon. © Mike Lorden

The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsDr Ross MacPhee has already taken the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to task over its management of wild horses. MacPhee, curator of vertebrates at the American Museum of Natural History, said in a speech on the 40th anniversary of the 1971 Wild Free-Roaming Horses & Burros Act: “What we are in now is a novel ecosystem; we’ve been altering it at an incredible rate for a very long period of time.”

In truly natural ecosystems, wild horses are subjected to myriad environmental and even social stresses within the herds and families, all of which over time determines which horses may survive and ultimately breed their strengths into the herd and genetic line.

Combat Shooter's Handbook  Successful surviving wild horses have endured variations in forage, water quality and availability, viruses, bacteria, parasites, insects, temperature extremes, predators and competition between stallions for breeding rights to mares, just to name a few. And these genetically superior survivors must be left in the ecosystem and allowed to pass their genes into the gene pool of the wild herd. The removal and/or alteration of distribution of these surviving wild horses via any artificial means interferes with the natural evolutional processes at work that ensures the strength of the genetic lines of wild horses.

Loss of genetic diversity

Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps InstituteA detailed study has already been undertaken that looked into the numerous breeds of domestic horses and the effects of inbreeding on heterozygosity. Generally, the overview of the findings suggests: “Not surprisingly, low diversity is observed in breeds with small census size, relatively old breeds with closed populations, and those with documented founder effects, whether due to population bottlenecks or selective breeding.

The BLM continues to reduce herd sizes on all Herd Management Areas (HMAs). We already have a surprisingly low total US census that counted only 67,000 free roaming wild horses (according to the BLM), and likely significantly fewer than that highly disputed census number.

A wild horse foal near Farmington, New Mexico. © Kevin Kunkel, BLM New Mexico

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)In a report, wild horse advocate Marybeth Devlin said of the BLM’s Arbitrary Management Level (AML): “The maximum number of wild horses that BLM says the Western range can sustain – 26,715- is a political construct. Wild horses are few and far between. Per the 31,583,386 acres – 49,349 square miles -of dedicated wild-horse habitat across the Western states, the AML establishes a maximum stocking density of 1 wild horse per 1,182 acres – nearly 2 square miles.  However, many herds are more severely restricted,” she said.

“To put this in perspective, nationally, BLM allows a stocking density of 1 cow-with-calf pair (or 5 sheep) per 76 acres, which means 8 cow-calf pairs (or 40 sheep) per square mile.  Further, within dedicated wild-horse habitats – where the mustangs are, by law, supposed to receive principal benefit of resources -livestock are often awarded 90% or more of the grazing slots.”

Devlin said wild horses were not breeding out of control, and that the nominated annual herd-growth was at most 5%, meaning it would take 14 years for a wild horse herd to double. “Gregg, LeBlanc, and Johnston (2014) found the average birth rate across wild-horse herds to be just under 20%.  But they also found that 50% of foals perish before their first birthday. Thus, the birth rate is just a temporary blip in the data.  Starting with the surviving-foal rate (10%), and then subtracting a conservative estimate of adult-mortality (5%), the expected normative herd-growth rate would be, at most, 5%.  At that rate, it would take 14 years for a wild-horse herd to double.  The corresponding growth-rate for wild-burro herds is 2%.  At that rate, it would take 35 years for a burro-herd to double.”

Devlin also said that she had noted that the BLM was reporting one-year increases in herd numbers “that are 50, 100, even 200 times the norm, far beyond what is biologically possible”.

For example, she said, “BLM claimed the Black Rock Range East’s population grew from 88 horses to 456 horses in one year, an increase of 368.  If so, that would mean each filly and mare gave birth to 17 foals.  BLM claimed the Carracas Mesa population grew from 12 horses to 75 horses in one year, an increase of 63.  If so, that would mean each filly and mare gave birth to 21 foals.”

A BLM contractor's helicopter musters wild horses during the fall 2016 Owyhee Complex roundup in Nevada. Photo: Steve Paige.
A BLM contractor’s helicopter musters wild horses during the fall 2016 Owyhee Complex roundup in Nevada. © Steve Paige.

She also said a report by Wild Horse Freedom Federation suggested that figures regarding the number of wild horses removed from the range and now boarded in private pastures did not appear to add up.

In many instances localized wild horse populations have been reduced to numbers that are no longer scientifically reasonable for the maintenance of critical genetic diversity within the population; some HMAs have fewer than 50 wild horses.

Further complicating and compounding this situation is the castration of wild stallions and the use of PZP as birth control on the mares in the remaining small and genetically limited wild horse populations.

As we learn in this article by Michael Ray Harris: “Independent research shows that PZP – which is derived from pig ovaries and is registered as a pesticide by the Environmental Protection Agency – can have lasting adverse effects on wild horses. According to Dr Cassandra Nuñez, PZP is associated with ovulation failure and can alter the birthing cycle of wild horses, resulting in birth out of season where the foal can die for lack of available food.

“Dr Nuñez also found that PZP has significant consequences on social behavior of wild horses. Normally bands of wild horses are very stable, and mares will stay with males for much, if not all, of their lives. However, when mares have been treated with PZP and cannot get pregnant, they may leave their bands. This creates instability in the bands and affects the health of the group members. The instability caused by PZP causes increased mortality, and can cause the parasite load of animals in the group to go up because of increased stress,” Harris wrote.

Pryor Mountain wild horses on the Montana-Wyoming border.
Pryor Mountain wild horses on the Montana-Wyoming border. © Brad Purdy, BLM Montana/ Dakotas

Breeding back to the core strength of the original genetic stock of wild horse gene-lines may ultimately provide the saving grace needed for many domestic horse breeds that are now suffering from a myriad of diseases and genetic conditions related to selective breeding.

Some wild horse advocacy organization keep doing the same old things and expecting new results. In the meantime, the American wild horse population trend-line is crashing. Statistically this is alarming. And this is also the reason why the BLM is adamantly opposed to American wild horses obtaining official ‘native species’ status under law, which if so obtained and based upon the current population census, would qualify them as an endangered species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).

It seems our American wild horses are at greater risk today than at any time in their past history.

Please carefully research and consider what organizations you are supporting and what they are doing with your donation dollars. The very survival of our precious wild horses depends upon your love and good judgment.

 

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