Closer look by NAU finds mixed results for intensive grazing

One of Savory’s points was that the intensive grazing helps the soil store carbon, which would help reverse climate change. But when Johnson and NAU research specialist Aradhana Roberts looked through the scientific literature, they couldn’t find consistent support for Savory’s assertion.
This is what happens when you turn things over to academia–perfectly logical conclusions rapidly (at the speed of light) turn into nonsense and taxpayer money disappears just as quickly from financing unnecessary “research.”
Have fun finding where these clowns missed the boat and add your comments below. — jtl, 419

 

Among environmentalists, ranchers and land managers, the name Allan Savory can elicit a range of responses. An ecologist who did much of his work in Africa, Savory advocates an intriguing idea: that a regimen of high intensity, short duration grazing, combined with holistic land management, can help fight desertification and even reverse climate change.
The technique of “mob grazing” imitates natural cycles of dense herds of grazing animals constantly moving across the landscape, Savory says.
Savory’s method has drawn criticism from many who say its benefits haven’t been replicated elsewhere and that the concept is riddled with caveats and unsupported by scientific information. At the same time, Savory’s ideas have spawned an entire institute in Boulder, Colorado, dedicated to perpetuating his land management teachings.
Now, researchers at Northern Arizona University are wading into the debate with their own test of Savory’s grazing methods on ranchland southeast of Flagstaff.
Nancy Johnson, a soil ecologist at NAU, decided to pursue the idea after seeing Savory’s 2013 TED talk.
It “made me crazy,” Johnson said.
Savory was so absolute, saying in no uncertain terms that there is only one solution and that is to graze according to his method, she said.
One of Savory’s points was that the intensive grazing helps the soil store carbon, which would help reverse climate change. But when Johnson and NAU research specialist Aradhana Roberts looked through the scientific literature, they couldn’t find consistent support for Savory’s assertion. So the two decided to do the experiments themselves.
Luckily, the team already had an ideal location. Another NAU professor, Tom Sisk, had nine plots at the Flying M Ranch where, since 1997, he has been comparing how native and invasive species respond to three grazing treatments: intensive grazing, with 200 cattle grazed on a one-hectare area for 24 hours once a year, no grazing, and the normal grazing regime practiced by ranch owner Kit Metzger. It was exactly the setup Johnson and Roberts needed for their study as well.
The main goal, Roberts said, was to study the effect of grazing management on soil carbon and how that tied into carbon sequestration and the potential to affect climate change.
According to Savory, masses of cattle allowed to graze only briefly on a segment of land act to trample the grass over the soil and cover it with dung and urine, which prepares it perfectly to absorb and hold rain, store carbon and break down methane. He contends that using this method on half the world’s grasslands could remove enough carbon from the atmosphere to return the planet to pre-industrial carbon dioxide levels.
At her experimental plots on the Flying M Ranch, Roberts spent a year measuring the soil carbon, which includes roots, fungus, bacteria, microscopic organisms and mycorrhiza, at each of the nine plots. What she found was that the intensively grazed plots did indeed have a higher amount of carbon per gram of soil. Over a year of measurements, the carbon content was 11 percent higher than plots that weren’t grazed at all.
Johnson explained that one hypothesis is that when cows munch the plant shoots above ground, it causes a dieback of roots, which delivers organic carbon deeper into the soil that may then decompose more slowly. Another hypothesis is that the cattle’s hooves push the plant pieces deeper into the soil.
“The key factor for increasing carbon storage below ground is to make the inputs of dead plants greater than the decomposer organisms can break down the compounds and respire out CO2,” Johnson wrote in a follow up email.
At the same time, Savory’s grazing method proved to have some drawbacks. The experiments found an increase in invasive species and noxious weeds on the heavily grazed land. Soil compaction also rose, which changes the ability for the water to filter into the ground and created drier soils, Roberts said.
The land grazed according to rancher Kit Metzger’s established systems landed somewhere in the middle of the two extremes in terms of vegetation characteristics and carbon content, she said.
The amount of carbon stored in soil also is important on a broader scale for cap-and-trade systems implemented in places like California, where emitters of greenhouse gases buy and sell credits allowing them to release more carbon into the atmosphere.
Additional information on how different grazing practices affect carbon storage can be used to improve and simplify carbon credit systems that allow ranchers to earn revenue by proving their responsible land management helps lock up more carbon in soils, said Megan McKenna, master’s student for environmental science and policy who is also working on the project.
“If there are protocols that are usable for a landowner but also rigorous enough for a market, I think there is a lot of potential to produce revenue,” she said.

Land and Livestock International, Inc. is in a position to assist the buyer in purchasing ranches like these anywhere in the Western United States and Northern Mexico. Pre – purchase services include help with due diligence, estimates of carrying capacity and potential for improvement, cash flow projections, etc. Post purchase services include everything from part time consulting to complete turn-key management.

Contact us at info@landandlivestockinternational.com or through our web site at www.landandlivestockinternational.com

Dripping Springs
Mule Creek, Grant County, New Mexico

The Dripping Springs Ranch is a highly improved working cattle ranch in a very desirable part of southwest New Mexico. Access to the Ranch from State Route 78 is excellent, and it is an easy drive to either Silver City, N. or Safford, Az. 232 deeded acres, 13,000 USFS acres, 150 AU. $2,500,000

Walking L Ranch
Wickenburg, Yavapai County

The Walking L Ranch’s 52+ square miles adjoin Wickenburg from the Hassayamapa River into the Wickenburg Mountains. The ranch originally consisted of the 10X Ranch on the south end and the Rincon Ranch on the north end.  The old Rincon Dude Ranch was added to the ranch’s Headquarters by the current owner. The ranch’s land tenure consists of deeded land, State and BLM Grazing Leases.  Topography is rolling to steep with elevation’s ranging from 2,100’ along the river to over 2,700’ on San Domingo Peak.  The ranch borders US 60 on the south side of Wickenburg.  The ranch’s deeded land is in seven non-contiguous parcels throughout the ranch.  The headquarters consists of 110.88 deeded acres on Rincon Road and the Hassayampa River with approximately 30 acres irrigated.  Another headquarters for the 10X is on the state lease. $5,000,000

Dos S Inholding
Fountain Hills, Maricopa County

The Dos S is a 22.78 acre private inholding surrounded by Tonto National Forest on Sycamore Creek.  It is located just off the Beeline Highway behind a locked gate 20 miles from the Shea Boulevard & Highway 87 intersection at Fountain Hills.  Payson is 40 miles to the north. $1,025,100

Posted in Holistic Management, Uncategorized | Tagged , | 4 Comments

Zinke is promoting true conservation at Department of Interior

Conservation is seen as the proper use of nature, while preservation aims to protect nature from any use.

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersYeah, they are saving it for future generations of park rangers.

Did you ever closely examine that phrase “saving resources for future generations?” Essentially that bestows a property right onto yet to be born individuals. But then, the instant they are born, they loose that property right. — jtl, 419

By Gabriella Hoffman, via The Hill

Zinke is promoting true conservation at Department of Interior
© Greg Nash

It’s a new era at the Department of Interior thanks to Secretary Ryan Zinke’s leadership.

 Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualZinke, who started his first day on the job on horseback flanked by U.S. Park Police, is the first Montanan to lead the agency. His reverence for angling, hunting and the outdoors means that he is promoting true conservation in his new post instead of preservation.

 Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View  Conservation is seen as the proper use of nature, while preservation aims to protect nature from any use. The latter philosophy has prevented Americans from fully enjoying opportunities in nature. True conservation entails protecting America’s waterways and wildlife without denying opportunities to explore them or safely develop nearby. How can Americans be good stewards of the environment if they are prevented from accessing it or working to make it better for their livelihoods? Secretary Zinke hopes to fill this void created by his predecessors.

Combat Shooter's Handbook Thus far, Zinke’s leadership has resulted in the enactment of numerous conservation policies. For example, he signed two secretarial orders to undue missteps like the reversal of Order 219, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service decree that banned lead tackle and ammunition on USFWS-protected lands. As a result of his efforts, over 100 outdoor industry leaders across fishing, shooting sports, hunting, archery, camping, marine, motorcycle, powersports, hospitality and recreation vehicle sectors have praised him for keeping the “great” in the Great Outdoors.

Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute “In his first 100 days in office, President Donald Trump Donald Trump is setting an agenda to emphasize and prioritize outdoor recreation on federal lands, highlighted by selecting … Zinke as secretary to lead the Department of the Interior,” the letter said. “Secretary Zinke, a strong supporter of the $887 billion outdoor recreation industry, is working closely with the Outdoor Recreation Industry Roundtable to increase access to recreational opportunities and enjoyment on all federal lands and waters.”

The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsIn late April, Zinke vowed to make his department the “Happy Department,” a response to historic mistrust of public land officials by a majority of Americans. It’s the right step, because the Interior shouldn’t be controversial or hostile to Americans. It should work in sync with them.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)  “The view from the Potomac is a lot different than from the view of the Colorado. And that’s part of the problem and why the West is a little angry and distrustful,” said Zinke. “The president has made it clear he wants to listen to local communities and the state. My job is to be an advocate, nice, helpful, friendly. We want to be the yep department and diffuse some of the anger.”

Here’s how Zinke is promoting true conservation at the Department of Interior so far.

Secretary Zinke said early on that he won’t be selling off all public lands to the highest bidder. In fact, he’s already living up to his promises. He issued several secretarial orders to increase opportunities to hunt on public lands and designate more wetlands for conservation. How can Americans enjoy public lands if they are shielded off from them?

Secretary Zinke is offering to be transparent with regards land management — especially out West. He announced that his department is reviewing up to 27 monuments under the Antiquities Act of 1906 and asking for public input of them — especially in wake of the controversial Bears Ears National Monument in Utah. The secretary has stressed that no monument will be stripped of a designation, nor will any environmental or conservation regulations on land and in marine areas be loosened.

Secretary Zinke is also working to making business and the environment work more in concert with one another. He said good stewardship of land and water paired with responsible offshore development aren’t mutually exclusive. He’s correct. You cannot have a healthy environment without a healthy business climate.

The previous administration practiced preservation by attempting to cut off fishing and hunting opportunities on public lands, pitting businesses against the environment, and making the safe exploration of oil and gas the enemy.

It’s encouraging to see Secretary Zinke promote true conservation at the Department of Interior. Let’s hope he fulfills his goal of making it the “Happy Department.”

Gabriella Hoffman (@Gabby_Hoffman) is a conservative media strategist and consultant based in Northern Virginia. She worked previously for the nonprofit Leadership Institute.


The views expressed by contributors are their own and are not the views of The Hill.

 

FOLLOW FLYOVER PRESS ON FACEBOOK

Check out our WebSite

Check out our e-Store

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualPlanned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual. This is the ideal squeal to A Handbook for Ranch Managers.  Although the ecological principles remain the same, what was originally known as “The Savory Grazing Method” now answers to a multitude of different names: ranching for profit, holistic management, managed grazing, mob grazing, management intensive grazing, etc. Land & Livestock International, Inc. uses “Restoration Grazing” under its “Managing the Ranch as a Business” program.” No mater what you call it, this summary and synopsis will guide you step by step through the process and teach you how to use it as it was originally intended. No more excuses for failing to complete your grazing plans.

Posted in Department of the Interior, Uncategorized | Tagged | Leave a comment

Obama kicks off first foreign speech with an astonishingly false statement on global warming

But is global warming already hurting agriculture? There’s not a lot of evidence for that claim.
Hardly any. jtl, 419
A Handbook for Ranch ManagersFormer President Barack Obama told those gathered at an agricultural conference that man-made global warming was already impacting agriculture on a global scale, shrinking crop yields and raising food prices.

“Our changing climate is already making it more difficult to produce food,” Obama said at the Seeds & Chips conference in Milan, Italy Tuesday, according to The New York Times.

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual  “We’ve already seen shrinking yields and rising food prices,” the former president said in his first speech outside the U.S. since leaving office in January.

But is global warming already hurting agriculture? There’s not a lot of evidence for that claim.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewIn fact, 2016 was a record year for crop yields, which have basically doubled since 2007.

Production of wheat, coarse grains and rice hit record levels in 2016, according to United Nations data. Cereal production is set to shrink 0.4 percent in 2017 “from the 2016 record high,” but “supplies are likely to remain large with next season’s cereal ending stocks remaining close to their record high opening levels,” the UN reports.

Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps InstituteAs for food prices, they’re well below recent highs hit in 2010. UN data shows the inflation-adjusted food index — the average of five commodity price indices — is just below where it was in 1965. the food price index peaked around 1975.

Some scientists predict global warming will shrink crop yields as extreme weather events, like droughts, storms and floods become more common. Crop production may improve marginally over higher latitudes, but countries at mid-and-lower latitudes could see food supplies crumble.

The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits   The Guardian reported “across Africa, yields from rain-fed agriculture could decline by as much as 50% by 2020,” summarizing UN findings.

Other experts say global warming, at least in the near-term, will be good for agriculture since increased carbon dioxide will boost plant growth. Current evidence suggests a “global greening” trend from increased CO2 from fossil fuel combustion.

Combat Shooter's HandbookObama pocketed more than $2.7 million for Tuesday’s speech on how agriculture is contributing to global warming.

Ironically, the former president flew a private jet to Milan where a 14-car convoy and 300-strong police escort awaited him. Obama’s entourage included a helicopter and took up two floors of the more than $9,000 a night Park Hyatt hotel.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)    Obama’s speech focused on how greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture were on the rise, posing a problem for future development. Obama said “the energy to bring about change” in agriculture will come from ordinary people.

“It’s going to come from parents who are concerned about the impact climate change may have on their child, from business people who say how can we use less energy or waste less resources in making our products,” Obama said. “It’s millions of decisions made individually that have the ability to make changes.”

Follow Michael on Facebook and Twitter

This article originally appeared in The Daily Caller

FOLLOW FLYOVER PRESS ON FACEBOOK

Check out our WebSite

Check out our e-Store

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersA Handbook for Ranch Managers.  In keeping with the “holistic” idea that the land, the livestock, the people and the money should be viewed as a single integrated whole: Part I deals with the management of the natural resources. Part II covers livestock production and Part III deals with the people and the money. Not only would this book make an excellent basic text for a university program in Ranch Management, no professional ranch manager’s reference bookshelf should be without it. It is a comprehensive reference manual for managing the working ranch. The information in the appendices and extensive bibliography alone is worth the price of the book.

You might also be interested in the supplement to this Handbook: Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual.

Posted in Global Warming, Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Mr. President, Tear up this treaty

It is equally obvious that virtually all developing nations signed the Paris treaty solely to share in hundreds of billions of dollars in expected (and demanded) “climate change adaptation, mitigation and reparation” money – and because they are not obligated to reduce their fossil fuel use or greenhouse gas emissions.
Why is it that “under developed nations” are under developed? Answer: Politics and culture.
I was once hired by the State of Chihuahua, Mexico to consult on a project to “help” the Tarahumara Indians living in the Sierra Madre. Their intent was “to help the people develop economically without changing their culture.” Something only a government bureaucrat could think of. Laughable. – jtl, 419
At his April 29 Harrisburg, PA rally (starting at13:09) President Trump made one of his strongest statements yet on the Paris climate (non)treaty.“Our government rushed to join international agreements where the United States pays the cost and bears the burdens, while other countries get the benefits and pay nothing,” the President said. “This includes deals like the one-sided Paris climate accord, where the United States pays billions of dollars, while China, Russia and India have contributed and will contribute nothing.

“On top of all of that, it’s estimated that full compliance with the agreement could ultimately shrink America’s GDP by $2.5 trillion dollars over a ten-year period. That means factories and plants closing all over our country. Not with me folks! I’ll be making a big decision on the Paris accord over the next two weeks, and we will see what happens.”

After months of White House and Administration discussions and battles over what to do about this anti-fossil fuel, anti-people, anti-US, wealth-redistributionist agreement, there is hope that President Trump will do what Candidate Trump had promised: Bring the United States back from the brink of disaster.

Colleagues and I have previously suggested two options that would quickly nullify what President Obama unilaterally tried to do during his final months in office, as well as any international justification for EPA and other regulations, such as the Clean Power Plan and social cost of carbon charade.

(1) Send the proposed Paris treaty to the US Senate, as required by the Constitution for any international agreement that significantly affects the United States and its citizens. This accord arguably affects us more than the vast majority of agreements that have indeed been treated as treaties and presented to the Senate under its advice and consent duties.

(2) Withdraw from the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the grandfather of the Paris treaty. We are well beyond the period during which withdrawal was not permitted, and pulling out of the UNFCCC would terminate any US obligations under the convention, the Obama Paris treaty and all other climate-related agreements.

Here’s why we should do that – and why President Trump should stick to his newly rediscovered guns.

It is increasingly obvious from what has been happening in the USA, Europe, Canada, Australia and elsewhere that climate and renewable energy policies kill millions of jobs and send millions of families into green energy poverty. It is equally obvious that virtually all developing nations signed the Paris treaty solely to share in hundreds of billions of dollars in expected (and demanded) “climate change adaptation, mitigation and reparation” money – and because they are not obligated to reduce their fossil fuel use or greenhouse gas emissions.

That means the United States would be obligated to de-carbonize, de-industrialize, and reduce its growth, job creation and living standards – while sending hundreds of billions of dollars to ruling elites in developing countries that will continue emitting greenhouse gases.

And that means there will be no global climate or environmental benefits even if those gases have somehow replaced the powerful solar and other natural forces that have driven climate change throughout Earth and human history. Atmospheric greenhouse gases will continue to climb, even if the United States shuts down every home, factory, power plant, vehicle, hospital and other carbon-based fuel user.

(For those who still believe in greenhouse gas-driven climate change, we would even be ending our use of cheap, reliable natural gas – the fuel that has allowed the United States to be virtually the only nation in the world to have steadily reduced its CO2/GHG emissions the past five years.)

Rejecting Paris would make the United States a true global leader – by disavowing and walking away from a treaty that was signed by President Obama but, in violation of the Constitution, never presented to the Senate, despite the hugely harmful impacts it would have on this nation. It would also mean this new President, and this new United States would lead from the front, instead of from behind.

Finally, it would awaken the rest of the world and validate their own inclinations to send this ill-conceived, one-sided, destructive, anti-humanity treaty to the ash heap of history, where it belongs.

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersLand & Livestock International, Inc is offering a “Free” week-long ranch manageme nt-planned grazing seminar-workshop.

What follows is a business model we have been following that has worked very well for us and for our clientele.

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualWe are seeking individual ranchers to sponsor/host workshops. The sponsor/host (and spouse or key employee) get the training at his/her ranch for no charge. This is an extra special benefit to the host as his/her land will be used for the “lab” work and hands on demonstrations. This provides a great start in the implementation of his/her program.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewIn return, he/she takes care of the logistics involved in putting on the event. This includes arranging for the venue, booking a block of rooms for lodging, arranging for meals (if any), putting out the advertising, setting and collecting the fees and so forth.

We are then responsible for putting on the workshop.

During the interim we will each keep track of our out of pocket costs (from our end, that will be mostly travel and lodging). Then, when it is all over, we both are reimbursed our out of pocket costs and split any funds remaining 50:50.

If this sounds like something you might be interested in, click here and let us know. If the link won’t work for you, copy and paste info@landandlivestockinternational.com into your browser.

Posted in Climate Change, Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Zinke questions using monument status to save sacred land

 Where I come from any country that claims “ownership” of over 60% of the land in 11 of its states is a definition for “communism.” — jtl, 419
Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, right, talks with two men on horses Monday, May 8, 2017, at the Butler Wash trailhead within Bears Ears National Monument near Blanding, Utah. Zinke says he wants to make sure Native American cultural standing is preserved in a new national monument but cautioned that not all tribal members share the same opinion about it. (AP Photo/Michelle Price)

A Handbook for Ranch Managers Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View Combat Shooter's Handbook Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)  

FOLLOW FLYOVER PRESS ON FACEBOOK

Check out our WebSite

Check out our e-Store

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View

edited by

Dr Jimmy T (Gunny) LaBaume

Is now available in both PAPERBACK and Kindle

BookCoverImageMurray N. Rothbard was the father of what some call Radical Libertarianism or Anarcho-Capitalism which Hans-Hermann Hoppe described as “Rothbard’s unique contribution to the rediscovery of property and property rights as the common foundation of both economics and political philosophy, and the systematic reconstruction and conceptual integration of modern, marginalist economics and natural-law political philosophy into a unified moral science: libertarianism.”

This book applies the principles of this “unified moral science” to environmental and natural resource management issues.

The book started out life as an assigned reading list for a university level course entitled Environmental and Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View.

As I began to prepare to teach the course, I quickly saw that there was a plethora of textbooks suitable for universal level courses dealing with environmental and natural resource economics. The only problem was that they were all based in mainstream neo-classical (or Keynesian) theory. I could find no single collection of material comprising a comprehensive treatment of environmental and natural resource economics based on Austrian Economic Theory.

However, I was able to find a large number of essays, monographs, papers delivered at professional meetings and published from a multitude of sources. This book is the result. It is composed of a collection of research reports and essays by reputable scientists, economists, and legal experts as well as private property and free market activists.

The book is organized into seven parts: I. Environmentalism: The New State Religion; II. The New State Religion Debunked; III. Introduction to Environmental and Natural Resource Economics; IV. Interventionism: Law and Regulation; V. Pollution and Recycling; VI. Property Rights: Planning, Zoning and Eminent Domain; and VII. Free Market Conservation. It also includes an elaborate Bibliography, References and Recommended Reading section including an extensive Annotated Bibliography of related and works on the subject.

The intellectual level of the individual works ranges from quite scholarly to informed editorial opinion.

FOLLOW LAND & LIVESTOCK INTERNATIONAL ON FACEBOOK

Check out our WebSite

Check out our Online Rancher Supply Store

Posted in antiquities act, Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Get Off My Fracking Land ! – OK, One more time.

Despite courts telling her that she couldn’t come onto private property to host her fracking protest, Oscar-winning actress Emma Thompson obviously thought she was above the law given her celebrity status.

Defiantly entering a local farm along with her sister Sophie, Emma Thompson and a small group of other protesters, set up their bake sale where they displayed energy-themed cakes as part of a Greenpeace-backed protest stunt.

But the farmer who owned the land wasn’t having it. And shortly after witnessing the trespassers, he cranked up his tractor, firing up the manure sprayer that was hooked to the back of it.

You’ll just have to watch what happens next because it’s hilarious!

Land and Livestock International, Inc. is in a position to assist the buyer in purchasing ranches like these anywhere in the Western United States and Northern Mexico. Pre – purchase services include help with due diligence, estimates of carrying capacity and potential for improvement, cash flow projections, etc. Post purchase services include everything from part time consulting to complete turn-key management.

Contact us at info@landandlivestockinternational.com or through our web site at www.landandlivestockinternational.com

Dripping Springs
Mule Creek, Grant County, New Mexico

The Dripping Springs Ranch is a highly improved working cattle ranch in a very desirable part of southwest New Mexico. Access to the Ranch from State Route 78 is excellent, and it is an easy drive to either Silver City, N. or Safford, Az. 232 deeded acres, 13,000 USFS acres, 150 AU. $2,500,000

Walking L Ranch
Wickenburg, Yavapai County

The Walking L Ranch’s 52+ square miles adjoin Wickenburg from the Hassayamapa River into the Wickenburg Mountains. The ranch originally consisted of the 10X Ranch on the south end and the Rincon Ranch on the north end.  The old Rincon Dude Ranch was added to the ranch’s Headquarters by the current owner. The ranch’s land tenure consists of deeded land, State and BLM Grazing Leases.  Topography is rolling to steep with elevation’s ranging from 2,100’ along the river to over 2,700’ on San Domingo Peak.  The ranch borders US 60 on the south side of Wickenburg.  The ranch’s deeded land is in seven non-contiguous parcels throughout the ranch.  The headquarters consists of 110.88 deeded acres on Rincon Road and the Hassayampa River with approximately 30 acres irrigated.  Another headquarters for the 10X is on the state lease. $5,000,000

Dos S Inholding
Fountain Hills, Maricopa County

The Dos S is a 22.78 acre private inholding surrounded by Tonto National Forest on Sycamore Creek.  It is located just off the Beeline Highway behind a locked gate 20 miles from the Shea Boulevard & Highway 87 intersection at Fountain Hills.  Payson is 40 miles to the north. $1,025,100

 

Posted in Radical Environmentalism, Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

When a Farmer Punches Back at the Feds

Duarte heard no more from the Corps as spring approached, but several months of silence were merely a prelude as the regulatory machine warmed. In late February, certified mail from the Corps arrived … the gravity of his alleged offense was clear in the first line: “This letter concerns your unauthorized work in waters of the United States.”

A Handbook for Ranch Managers Ah yes, the uS Army Corps of Engineers–a swamp in dire need of draining. — jtl, 419

jsd
When John Duarte plowed 4″ to 7″ deep, he was accused of deep ripping and threatened with fines and potential imprisonment.
© Duarte Nursery

 

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual With the crank of a Case IH Quadtrac, John Duarte unwittingly poked leviathan and unleashed the highest levels of government regulation on his farmland. The annals of bureaucratic overreach are packed with stories of draconian intervention on U.S. farms … and then there is the Duarte account. The case should have been a standard off-the-radar, bull-rush government victory, but for one inconvenient snag: Duarte punched back.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewLocked in a cage match with the Army Corps of Engineers and Department of Justice (DOJ), Duarte has been found liable of breaching the Clean Water Act (CWA). His crime? Plowing 450 acres of farmland. His penalty? Potentially millions in fines. If Duarte ultimately loses in court, his fall will affect the property rights of landowners and farmers across the U.S.

Combat Shooter's Handbook Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsDuarte, 50, is a fourth-generation producer and president of Duarte Nursery, located on the west side of the Sacramento Valley. The Modesto, Calif.-based nursery sells rootstock (almonds, avocadoes, grapes, pistachios and grapes) to farmer-customers across the West Coast. In 2012, Duarte bought 450 acres of cobbly, red clay ground for investment and potential future orchard development. The fields had been in wheat during the 1970s and 1980s, followed by cattle grazing in the 1990s and early 2000s.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) Biologists surveyed the ground and mapped out wetlands, composed of vernal pools, for Duarte. The pools form after rains in the low field pockets, typically several inches deep and one-hundredth of an acre in size, and last several weeks before drying.

In December 2012, Duarte hired a local operator at $50 per acre to till the ground with a Case Quadtrac and Wilcox ripper. “We wanted the dirt opened down to several inches, but no deep ripping,” Duarte says. “Anyhow, nobody gets much tillage for $50 an acre in California.”

Rolling down Rawson Road, Corps field agent Matthew Kelly pulled onto the shoulder when he spotted the Quadtrac sitting in Duarte’s fields. Camera in hand, Kelly put the lens’ crosshairs on the Quadtrac and triggered an advance of Corps control over Duarte’s future.

“About two weeks later, Matthew Kelly called me and said, ‘You’re deep ripping vernal pools.’ One, I told him we were not deep ripping. Two, I told him the driver was going around the vernal pools, which I had instructed be done. I offered to meet on site and show him, but he turned me down,” Duarte says.

Duarte heard no more from the Corps as spring approached, but several months of silence were merely a prelude as the regulatory machine warmed. In late February, certified mail from the Corps arrived on the doorstep of Duarte Nursery at 1555 Baldwin Road. When Duarte opened the envelope and removed a cease and desist order (CDO), the gravity of his alleged offense was clear in the first line: “This letter concerns your unauthorized work in waters of the United States.”

The letter accused Duarte of discharging “dredged or fill material into seasonal wetlands” without a permit. He was ordered to “cease and desist” under threat of potential fines and imprisonment. Duarte Nursery sent a detailed response denying any CWA violation, demanded the information on which the Corps based its determination and asked for a hearing. (Corps officials declined comment due to pending litigation.)

The Corps sent Duarte an outdated wetlands map of the property along with an assertion saying Duarte had “deep ripped” the property, but otherwise the agency essentially remained silent for several months without giving Duarte Nursery a hearing regarding the CDO. Following the Corps’ refusal to release the CDO information and denial of a hearing, Duarte Nursery filed a due process lawsuit in U.S. District Court in October 2013.

vernal

Vernal pools form in low field pockets after rains, typically several inches deep and one-hundredth of an acre in size, and last several weeks before drying.

© Duarte Nursery

The Corps sought dismissal multiple times, asserting the CDO was not a direct order, but merely a suggestion. Despite spending $50,000 in planting costs and abandoning a future harvest, the Corps argued Duarte had stopped farming by his own volition. The presiding judge denied dismissal and compared the Corp’s CDO actions to holding a gun against Duarte’s head and then asserting Duarte should have realized the gun was empty.

By May 2014, the government was prepared to bring Duarte to heel, and the DOJ charged him with destruction of wetlands and violation of the CWA. “The Corps first took my case to Gina McCarthy’s EPA and they declined to prosecute,” Duarte contends. “The EPA wanted no part of it and that’s very telling. So the Corps next took it to DOJ and they hopped on board.” (EPA and DOJ officials declined comment due to pending litigation.)

Plowing is not regulated by the CWA according to agency regulations, but the government refused to concede Duarte’s tillage was plowing or that it was for the purpose of planting wheat. The government also argued the tillage didn’t merit an exemption for “normal farming practices” because his farmland wasn’t “part of an ongoing farming operation.” (Actual CWA text mentions nothing about “ongoing farming.”) Twenty years of wheat production followed by 15 years of livestock production wasn’t a continuous farming operation, according to DOJ.

DOJ also sent an evidentiary team equipped with a backhoe to Duarte’s property (on ground the government deemed too sensitive to plow) and dug up roughly 20 vernal pools to a depth of 2’ and 3’ down, piled the dirt back and left after 13 days. The DOJ disturbance was far deeper than Duarte’s tillage. “They literally dug a bunch of pits in the same wetlands they accused me of destroying by plowing them a few inches,” he says.

The Corps originally told DOJ Duarte had ripped down to 36” deep. However, the final DOJ report admitted tillage was 4” to 7” deep, which matched Duarte’s claims from the beginning of the conflict.

Yet, tillage depth was secondary evidence compared to the government’s jewel in the crown: mini mountains. Duarte’s 5” tall furrows were labeled “small mountain ranges” that had converted the wetlands into dry land. “I couldn’t believe what they were saying. No farm in the U.S. is safe if the government can get away with these kinds of claims,” Duarte says.

The DOJ’s benchmark prosecution of Duarte upends the understanding of plowing, other normal farming practices, CWA interpretation and private ownership. “This represents an effort by the Corps and career attorneys at the DOJ to do one thing: erode CWA protections for farming,” says Anthony Francois, Duarte’s attorney with the Pacific Legal Foundation (PLF). “If CWA protections don’t apply to farming in this case, they can be taken away in any case”

Duarte knew he was in for a lengthy court battle and faced millions of dollars in penalties for less than 1’ of tillage on 450 acres that had been plowed countless times in the past. On June 10, 2016, in U.S. District Court, Judge Kimberly Mueller accepted the government’s argument that Duarte was liable for plowing his farmland without a permit from the Corps. According to Judge Mueller, Duarte’s plowing caused “the material in this case soil, to move horizontally, creating furrows and ridges.”

The court ruled Duarte’s plowing implement was a point source under the CWA: “The equipment loosened and moved the soil horizontally, pulling the dirt out of the wetlands…”

Boiled down, Judge Mueller agreed with the Corps that because Duarte chiseled a few inches into the ground and moved dirt within a vernal puddle, he was liable for discharging dredged and fill material.

“This case is nuts,” says Washington, D.C., attorney Gary Baise with OFW Law. “Are you kidding? Creating ridges in a farm field is an addition of a pollutant to the waters of the United States?”

In March 2017, Mueller declined to pass the case to an appellate court and announced procession into the penalty phase. In August 2017, DOJ litigators are scheduled to ask Duarte be ordered to pay almost $3 million in cash, plus spend millions more on wetland “mitigation credits.”

As of March 2017, Duarte has spent $1.6 million in litigation and started a GoFundMe account (Duartestandsup) to alleviate expenses. The U.S. government has spent close to (if not more than) $1 million in taxpayer money in pursuit of Duarte, according to the PLF. Duarte faces up to $8 million in fines between the main penalty and wetland restoration credits. “The DOJ didn’t come up with $8 million so it could be used to heal my dirt. They looked at my nursery and personal finances to make sure the penalties would crush me,” he says.

Francois sends out a clear warning to farmers: “Just because an adviser says you’re using normal farming practices according to the CWA doesn’t mean the Corps agrees. When the Corps has no standard for what a normal practice is, anyone can be subject to the same circumstances as John Duarte.”

“This case carries an attitude about punishing agriculture,” Baise adds. “It’s an attitude where tilling disturbs the environment, poisons water and is somehow evil.”

Duarte again

“Things are changing for right now, but make no mistake, all of this radical regulation will be back in the future,” Duarte says.

© Duarte Nursery

In the background of Duarte’s litigation, President Trump issued an executive order on Feb. 28, essentially directing EPA Director Scott Pruitt to tighten the CWA scope and rewrite the Waters of the United States (WOTUS) rules. “The Clean Water Act says that the EPA can regulate “navigable waters”— meaning waters that truly affect interstate commerce,” Trump stated at the signing. “But a few years ago, the EPA decided “navigable waters” can mean nearly every puddle or every ditch on a farmer’s land … It was a massive power grab.”

Rep. Jeff Denham, R-Calif., says the Duarte Nursery situation is not an exception. “President Trump’s executive order redirects the EPA to review WOTUS, including the definition of navigable waterways. Courts should follow legislative intent not legislate from the bench. This is not an isolated incident. A number of farmers in California have been cited by the Army Corps for general farming practices.”

“President Trump and EPA Administrator Pruitt have sent a clear signal that this kind of abusive prosecution is not in the federal government’s plans going forward. Mr. Pruitt said as much about this very case in his Senate confirmation hearing,” Francois says. “But career bureaucrats and prosecutors are still trying to push the Duarte case forward. The new administration has an important opportunity to follow through on its new direction by withdrawing its claims against Duarte Nursery and John Duarte.”

“Things are changing for right now, but make no mistake, all of this radical regulation will be back in the future,” Duarte notes. “I don’t want to go back to feudal Europe where the sheriff of Nottingham rides through your property and tells you how much you owe.

The Duarte legal saga was never supposed to make it to the federal stage: When the Corps sent Duarte the CDO letter in 2013, he was supposed to kiss the ring. Instead, Duarte refused to kneel: “After four generations of California farming for my family, I can’t let this stand without a fight.”

“This case threatens all farmers, not just me. If they can shake me down, they can shake you down” he adds. “We hang together or we hang separately.”

 

FOLLOW FLYOVER PRESS ON FACEBOOK

Check out our WebSite

Check out our e-Store

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualPlanned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual. This is the ideal squeal to A Handbook for Ranch Managers.  Although the ecological principles remain the same, what was originally known as “The Savory Grazing Method” now answers to a multitude of different names: ranching for profit, holistic management, managed grazing, mob grazing, management intensive grazing, etc. Land & Livestock International, Inc. uses “Restoration Grazing” under its “Managing the Ranch as a Business” program.” No mater what you call it, this summary and synopsis will guide you step by step through the process and teach you how to use it as it was originally intended. No more excuses for failing to complete your grazing plans.

Posted in Radical Environmentalism, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Bundy Ranch Trial: Hung Jury in First of 3 Planned Trials for Multiple Defendants

 A big surprise in the trial was the revelation that one of the defendants, Gregory Burleson of Phoenix, Arizona, was a paid informant for the FBI. As it turned out, Burleson was the one defendant that the jury seemed to be convinced about, returning a guilty verdict on eight charges. He faces a minimum of 57 years in prison at sentencing July 26.

That is the minimum he deserves for being a snitch for the Feds.

This kind of “sneakiness” used by the FedGov is typical of the Marxist/Communist style used by the old Soviet Union.

It has been said that our liberty depends on three “boxes.” The ballot box, the cartridge box and the jury box. Well, we have all seen what “voting” has done for us and none of us desire a shooting war. So, that leaves Jury Nullification as the only viable alternative. — jtl, 419

Written by  William F. Jasper for The New American

Bundy Ranch Trial: Hung Jury in First of 3 Planned Trials for Multiple Defendants

After a deadlocked jury failed a second time on April 24 to return verdicts in the Bundy Ranch standoff case, U.S. District Judge Gloria Navarro in Las Vegas, Nevada, declared a mistrial. Each of the six defendants, all out-of-state men who had traveled to Nevada in 2014 to stand with embattled rancher Cliven Bundy, have been charged with 10 felony crimes, including conspiracy against the United States, threatening a federal officer, assault on a federal officer, brandishing a firearm, and interstate travel to aid extortion. Federal prosecutors characterized the six defendants as dangerous “gunmen” in a massive conspiracy aimed at intimidating and endangering federal law enforcement officers. A big surprise in the trial was the revelation that one of the defendants, Gregory Burleson of Phoenix, Arizona, was a paid informant for the FBI. As it turned out, Burleson was the one defendant that the jury seemed to be convinced about, returning a guilty verdict on eight charges. He faces a minimum of 57 years in prison at sentencing July 26. Todd Engel of Boundary County, Idaho, was found guilty of obstruction and traveling across state lines in aid of extortion, and could face up to 30 years in prison.

Judge Navarro declared a mistrial in regard to the four additional men charged in the case — Richard Lovelien, Orville Scott Drexler, Eric Parker, and Steven Stewart — and set a new trial date for them for June 26. That date coincides with the previously scheduled start date for the second group of “ringleader” defendants: Cliven Bundy; his sons Ammon and Ryan Bundy; Ryan Payne; and talk radio show host Peter Santilli. A third trial for another six defendants is scheduled for August.

“I think it should show the federal government that they have a much weaker case than they thought going into this, because we’ve now had two months of testimony from over 50 prosecution witnesses, and they couldn’t get 12 people to agree,” said Todd Leventhal, attorney for Scott Drexler, in a statement to members of the media outside court.

This was another major defeat for federal prosecutors, who saw a jury acquit seven defendants in a similar trial over the related Oregon Standoff trial last October.

FBI Informant Mystery

The conviction of Gregory Burleson has introduced several factors into the Bundy Ranch Standoff trials that have stirred considerable interest and alarm, including the FBI’s use of informants as agent provocateurs and the use of agents posing as journalists or independent documentary film makers. During the trial, prosecutors played video excerpts of interviews of some of the defendants that had been recorded for the FBI’s fake documentary, “America Reloaded.” The most inflammatory statements in the film came from Burleson, who had aroused suspicions among many Bundy supporters due to his erratic behavior and wild, provocative statements. In a story titled “Bundy supporter says he wanted to kill federal agents in fake documentary,” Channel 8, the Las Vegas CBS television news affiliate, on March 23, 2017, reported:

Three men known as Cliven Bundy supporters thought they were being interviewed by a film crew. It turns out it was the FBI.

It’s the new development in the federal trial against the supporters of the Bunkerville rancher.

On Thursday, interviews were played of three defendants recorded for what they thought was a documentary called “America Reloaded.”

The interviews turned out to be a part of the federal case against them because the film crew was made up of undercover FBI agents.

During the interview with defendant Gregory Burleson, he said he was ready to kill federal agents, that he helped organize the standoff against them and showed up with guns and ammunition, and was disappointed things ended without blood.

Burleson was also recorded saying he wanted to put federal agents six feet under because he believed they were breaking the law and abusing their authority.

It was revealed in court earlier this week, Burleson had previously been a paid FBI informant.

Crucial questions that Burleson’s co-defendants and their defense attorneys undoubtedly will be seeking answers to include: Precisely when was Burleson employed by the FBI (and possibly other agencies) as an informant? How much he was paid?  Who directed/handled him? Under what instructions/directives did he operate? Why did they turn on him? There is also the very serious issue of potential violation of attorney-client privilege, since Burleson and his counsel were present at the defense planning meetings with the other defendants and their attorneys, and could have transmitted information from those meetings to the government prosecutors.

Photo shows supporter of defendants outside federal courthouse in Las Vegas, April 24, 2017: AP Images

Related articles:

Cliven Bundy Charged With Conspiracy. What About the Court Charge of Conspiracy by BLM? 

Not Guilty! Prosecutors Stunned — 7 Defendants in Oregon Standoff Trial Acquitted 

War on the West: Why More Bundy Standoffs Are Coming

Questions Raised About Senator Reid’s Connection to Bundy Ranch Dispute

Last Man Standing: Nevada Ranch Family in Fedgov Face-off

Bundy’s Case: Feds Do Not Own the Land Where His Cattle Graze

BLM’s Seizure of Nevada Rancher’s Land Rights Unconstitutional

Monumental Audacity — Obama Grabs Huge Western Lands by Executive Order 

LaVoy Finicum’s Family: New Video Release Shows Police/FBI Shooting Was “Murder”

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersLand & Livestock International, Inc is offering a “Free” week-long ranch manageme nt-planned grazing seminar-workshop.

What follows is a business model we have been following that has worked very well for us and for our clientele.

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualWe are seeking individual ranchers to sponsor/host workshops. The sponsor/host (and spouse or key employee) get the training at his/her ranch for no charge. This is an extra special benefit to the host as his/her land will be used for the “lab” work and hands on demonstrations. This provides a great start in the implementation of his/her program.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewIn return, he/she takes care of the logistics involved in putting on the event. This includes arranging for the venue, booking a block of rooms for lodging, arranging for meals (if any), putting out the advertising, setting and collecting the fees and so forth.

We are then responsible for putting on the workshop.

During the interim we will each keep track of our out of pocket costs (from our end, that will be mostly travel and lodging). Then, when it is all over, we both are reimbursed our out of pocket costs and split any funds remaining 50:50.

If this sounds like something you might be interested in, click here and let us know. If the link won’t work for you, copy and paste info@landandlivestockinternational.com into your browser.

Posted in Bundy Ranch, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Ryan Bundy sues federal government

 “Plaintiff Bundy has been forced and threatened to undergo oppressive, intrusive, and unlawful body cavity searches multiple times per day where his clothing is removed, where his genitals are or would be exposed to Defendant Doe’s during these multifarious and nonconsensual intrusions against his fourth, fifth, eight and fourteenth amendment rights,” Bundy, who is representing himself, wrote in the lawsuit.

A Handbook for Ranch Managers

Sounds like cruel and unusual punishment to me. — jtl, 419

Ryan Bundy, son of rancher Cliven Bundy, gets the paperwork necessary to file official complaints and press charges against federal law enforcement agents stemming from last months failed cattle r ...
FILE – This Jan. 27, 2016, file photo provided by the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office, shows Ryan Bundy. Bundy and his brother, Ammon Bundy, are being transferred from a Portland, Ore., jail to Nevada Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016, where they will be tried early next year on charges stemming from a 2014 standoff with federal agents near their father’s ranch.(Multnomah County Sheriff via AP, File)
Updated April 25, 2017 – 7:26 pm
By Jenny Wilson Las Vegas Review-Journal

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualRyan Bundy, a son of embattled rancher Cliven Bundy who is incarcerated pending trial on conspiracy charges, has sued the federal government.

In a lawsuit filed Monday in the U.S. District Court for Nevada in Las Vegas, Bundy challenges the constitutionality of prison policies and alleges deprivation of rights after he was punished for refusing to obey those policies.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewBundy was transferred to prison in Nevada last fall after he was acquitted of conspiring to stage an armed takeover of a national wildlife refuge in Oregon. He is scheduled to stand trial later this year on separate federal conspiracy charges that result from an armed standoff near his father’s ranch in Bunkerville in April 2014.

Combat Shooter's Handbook Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits“Plaintiff Bundy has been forced and threatened to undergo oppressive, intrusive, and unlawful body cavity searches multiple times per day where his clothing is removed, where his genitals are or would be exposed to Defendant Doe’s during these multifarious and nonconsensual intrusions against his fourth, fifth, eight and fourteenth amendment rights,” Bundy, who is representing himself, wrote in the lawsuit.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2)The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) “Plaintiff Bundy has been forced and threatened to bend over and expose his anus by spreading his butt cheeks wide open while Defendant Doe’s peer up into Mr. Bundy’s rear body cavity hundreds of times,” he wrote.

The constitutionality of prison strip searches has been litigated extensively. In such cases, the courts generally are concerned with how to balance the prison’s interest in maintaining security with a detainee’s Fourth Amendment rights against unreasonable searches and seizures.

In 2012, a divided U.S. Supreme Court upheld prison strip searches of detainees arrested for minor offenses like traffic violations. Bundy is charged with multiple felonies.

The issue generally causes split decisions, but since 1979, courts consistently have upheld blanket strip search policies for pretrial detainees.

“On or around March 20, 2017, Plaintiff Bundy refused to undergo any further strip/body cavity searches imposed upon his person,” Bundy wrote in his filing. He said prison employees “continue to ‘punish’” his decision to refuse to be strip searched by “keeping him locked down in disciplinary segregation for twenty-four hours per day, with no opportunity for meaningful daily exercise.”

Bundy acknowledges in his filing that prison officials offered to transport him to a hearing on the constitutionality of strip searches.

But, in a convoluted sentence, he seems to claim that is unconstitutional, because he would have to be strip searched to attend the administrative grievance hearing.

He says that while in disciplinary segregation, he has been deprived a working toilet, toilet paper, a pencil and paper and thus has “no way to prepare for his own defense against the Government.”

“As of April 18, 2017, Plaintiff Bundy has been in “the hole” for approximately (40) days,” he said in his filing.

Bundy lists United States Inc. as one of the defendants in his lawsuit, choosing to refer to the federal government as a corporation. He is seeking roughly $35 million in damages from a multitude of defendants, who include the Corrections Corporation of America, Nevada Southern Detention Center Warden Charlotte Collins and a number of federal employees whose names were not listed in the filing.

Contact Jenny Wilson at jenwilson@reviewjournal.com or 702-384-8710. Follow @jennydwilson on Twitter.

 

FOLLOW FLYOVER PRESS ON FACEBOOK

Check out our WebSite

Check out our e-Store

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View

edited by

Dr Jimmy T (Gunny) LaBaume

Is now available in both PAPERBACK and Kindle

BookCoverImageMurray N. Rothbard was the father of what some call Radical Libertarianism or Anarcho-Capitalism which Hans-Hermann Hoppe described as “Rothbard’s unique contribution to the rediscovery of property and property rights as the common foundation of both economics and political philosophy, and the systematic reconstruction and conceptual integration of modern, marginalist economics and natural-law political philosophy into a unified moral science: libertarianism.”

This book applies the principles of this “unified moral science” to environmental and natural resource management issues.

The book started out life as an assigned reading list for a university level course entitled Environmental and Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View.

As I began to prepare to teach the course, I quickly saw that there was a plethora of textbooks suitable for universal level courses dealing with environmental and natural resource economics. The only problem was that they were all based in mainstream neo-classical (or Keynesian) theory. I could find no single collection of material comprising a comprehensive treatment of environmental and natural resource economics based on Austrian Economic Theory.

However, I was able to find a large number of essays, monographs, papers delivered at professional meetings and published from a multitude of sources. This book is the result. It is composed of a collection of research reports and essays by reputable scientists, economists, and legal experts as well as private property and free market activists.

The book is organized into seven parts: I. Environmentalism: The New State Religion; II. The New State Religion Debunked; III. Introduction to Environmental and Natural Resource Economics; IV. Interventionism: Law and Regulation; V. Pollution and Recycling; VI. Property Rights: Planning, Zoning and Eminent Domain; and VII. Free Market Conservation. It also includes an elaborate Bibliography, References and Recommended Reading section including an extensive Annotated Bibliography of related and works on the subject.

The intellectual level of the individual works ranges from quite scholarly to informed editorial opinion.

FOLLOW LAND & LIVESTOCK INTERNATIONAL ON FACEBOOK

Check out our WebSite

Check out our Online Rancher Supply Store

Posted in Bundy Ranch, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

After mistrial declared for 4 defendants, Bundy supporters say case far from over

 Supporter Doug Knowles calls the system rigged. He said he believes the government is pushing for a plea bargain.

Just like everything else ran by the government, there is no incentive for economic efficiency or professionalism nor is there any penalty for incompetence or malfeasance. And also just like anything else ran by the government, the court system should be abolished. — jtl, 419

by Denise Rosch via News 3 LV

LAS VEGAS (KSNV News3LV) — Seven weeks of testimony. Five days of deliberations. Two convictions. Four mistrials.

Supporters of the Bundy 6 know the case is far from over.

“I don’t think there was a case here all along,” said Bundy supporter John Lamb.

Monday morning delivered a partial verdict. Gregory Burleson was found guilty on eight of 10 counts related to the 2014 standoff in Bunkerville, including assaulting a federal officer. Co-defendant Todd Engel convicted of two of the 10 counts including obstruction.

But from there, deliberations seem to fall apart. The jury deadlocked on all charges against four other defendants.

“It’s a win whenever you get a hung jury in federal court,” said Todd Leventhal, who represents Scott Drexler. “For defense attorneys, it’s a win.

“I just spoke with the jurors, and they had a lot of opinions on what they liked and didn’t like,” Leventhal said. “They thought the government came in with too much evidence; they didn’t believe all their witnesses.”

According to the government, each of the men charged had pointed a firearm at federal agents, conspiring with Cliven Bundy to stop the roundup of his cattle that the Bureau of Land Management maintained were illegally grazing on federal land.

Monday’s mistrial means prosecutors will try the case again. The re-trials are scheduled to begin June 26 — the same date that the trial against Bundy and two of his sons was set to begin.

Supporter Doug Knowles calls the system rigged. He said he believes the government is pushing for a plea bargain.

“These boys have been in jail a year, and they still haven’t been convicted,” Knowles said.

Land and Livestock International, Inc. is in a position to assist the buyer in purchasing ranches like these anywhere in the Western United States and Northern Mexico. Pre – purchase services include help with due diligence, estimates of carrying capacity and potential for improvement, cash flow projections, etc. Post purchase services include everything from part time consulting to complete turn-key management.

Contact us at info@landandlivestockinternational.com or through our web site at www.landandlivestockinternational.com

Dripping Springs
Mule Creek, Grant County, New Mexico

The Dripping Springs Ranch is a highly improved working cattle ranch in a very desirable part of southwest New Mexico. Access to the Ranch from State Route 78 is excellent, and it is an easy drive to either Silver City, N. or Safford, Az. 232 deeded acres, 13,000 USFS acres, 150 AU. $2,500,000

Walking L Ranch
Wickenburg, Yavapai County

The Walking L Ranch’s 52+ square miles adjoin Wickenburg from the Hassayamapa River into the Wickenburg Mountains. The ranch originally consisted of the 10X Ranch on the south end and the Rincon Ranch on the north end.  The old Rincon Dude Ranch was added to the ranch’s Headquarters by the current owner. The ranch’s land tenure consists of deeded land, State and BLM Grazing Leases.  Topography is rolling to steep with elevation’s ranging from 2,100’ along the river to over 2,700’ on San Domingo Peak.  The ranch borders US 60 on the south side of Wickenburg.  The ranch’s deeded land is in seven non-contiguous parcels throughout the ranch.  The headquarters consists of 110.88 deeded acres on Rincon Road and the Hassayampa River with approximately 30 acres irrigated.  Another headquarters for the 10X is on the state lease. $5,000,000

Dos S Inholding
Fountain Hills, Maricopa County

The Dos S is a 22.78 acre private inholding surrounded by Tonto National Forest on Sycamore Creek.  It is located just off the Beeline Highway behind a locked gate 20 miles from the Shea Boulevard & Highway 87 intersection at Fountain Hills.  Payson is 40 miles to the north. $1,025,100

Posted in Bundy Ranch, Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Leave a comment