Good Bye, Cruel Facebook

That feeling is beginning to grow in a lot of us. — jtl, 419

Flyover-Press.com

No, it wasn’t privacy that made me leave, I left Facebook because I realized it was adding very little value to my life.

The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits

That feeling is beginning to grow in a lot of us. — jtl, 419

By Luis P. Almeida via LewRockwell.com

Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps InstituteThe other night I was with my wife and daughters at a pop concert when my mom called me just as the main act was taking the stage. Normally, I would have let the call go to voicemail, but I knew my mom was upset, so I picked up. “My son, what happened to you? Please, tell me.”, she implored. I marveled at the fact I could actually hear her while I assured her that everything was fine and that I simply had decided to delete my Facebook account. She said, “Oh, my lord. I tried to tag you in a post and you were gone!” By…

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The secret lives of well-digging burros

The first image Erick Lundgren recorded of a digging burro.
The first image Erick Lundgren recorded of a digging burro.

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersA researcher in the Arizona desert is unearthing hitherto unknown secrets about the remarkable well-digging exploits of wild burros.

Erick Lundgren, a PhD student in the biology program at Arizona State University, has used motion detecting game cameras in his research to learn more about the ability of burros to dig for water, and has also chronicled many other species taking advantage of the burros’ wells.

Erick Lundgren
Erick Lundgren

Lundgren, who has worked as a field technician in projects involving birds, mammals, and rivers over the last nine years, has focused his efforts on Arizona’s desert, where burros can dig wells more than a meter deep.

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual  “Many species use these wells for drinking water,” Lundgren told Horsetalk.

“This behavior has never been described in the literature, likely due to prevailing negative attitudes towards introduced species.”

He explains how he first became involved in researching the water-finding prowess of burros, which is part of what he calls the unseen ecology of the species.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View“Four years ago I was camping on a beautiful river in the Sonoran desert of Arizona,” he says.

“This river winds through a brutally gorgeous landscape that looks like melted wax; old multicolored volcanic debris, steep canyons, saguaros and cottonwoods.

Combat Shooter's Handbook Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits“As a field biologist, I was becoming interested in how ecologists understand and describe invasive species.

“I was beginning to realize that to demonize a species because it doesn’t belong may prevent us from seeing what it actually does.

“It was on this trip that I began seeing, after years of working and camping on this river without noticing, these strange features – wells.”

infologoWhat is a burro? In the Iberian Peninsula and the Americas, a burro is a small donkey. Burro is the Spanish and Portuguese word for donkey. In the United States, “burro” is used as a loan word by English speakers to describe any small donkey used primarily as a pack animal, as well as to describe the wild donkeys that live in Arizona, California, Oregon, Utah,Texas and Nevada.

TThe Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2)The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)hree years later, he had successfully documented the origin of these wells, and confirmed his suspicions: They were dug by burros.

“Burro well-digging has never been described in the scientific literature,” he says.

Lundgren says he is now doing his PhD research on this phenomena, which connects to a growing body of scientific thought that is shifting opinions on introduced species.

“From my preliminary data, it appears that burros are significantly increasing water availability in the desert.

Riparian vegetation germinating in burro wells.
Riparian vegetation germinating in burro wells.

“I have found sites that are very arid, with limited and intermittent surface water, where burro-wells maintain access to subterranean water throughout the year.”

He found that, in certain contexts, these burro-wells appeared to function as vegetation nurseries. He found that significantly more cottonwood and willow seedlings germinated in abandoned burro-wells than in adjacent riverbank zones.

Lundgren said a small grant from Arizona State University had enabled him to buy several trail cameras for his research. That enabled him to document 13 species using these wells, including bighorn sheep.

“I am surely missing many smaller-bodied species. In fact, javelina and cattle appear to use these wells at a greater frequency than even burros.”

Lundgren said his research was revealing a more nuanced understanding of burros.

“Not only is this relevant to the management of wild burros, but also to the paradigms which shape our understandings of ecological communities in general.”

Lundgren has faced challenges in carrying out his work.

Last year he launched a crowdfunding campaign on the Indiegogo platform to fund his ongoing work.

He raised $US4640 – well above his original target – which had enabled him to buy 12 game cameras and fund a crew of undergraduates to join him in conducting preliminary research through the summer of 2016.

Javelina (also known as a peccary or skunk pig) bathing in burro well.
Javelina (also known as a peccary or skunk pig) bathing in a burro well.

Looking ahead, he says if he can raise another $US8000 he would be able to conduct the research full-time through the winter and summer of 2017 – work which he said would allow him to robustly answer the key questions around the burros’ water-finding activities and how they interact with their local ecosystems.

“I could,” he says, “use a million dollars on this research, but I’d be able to do a ton more with just $8000, as I would be able to collect data full-time, instead of just on weekends.

“Primarily, I need to map the distribution of this behavior, of these well-features, across the larger southwestern landscape to understand how common this phenomena is, and to what extent it influences the availability and persistence of water.”

Lundgren says he is currently in the midst of the field season for his burro research, as well as working a full-time field job which he took because he did not raise enough money to fund his living expenses over the summer.

“This summer I’m trying to understand the extent of this behavior – the digging of wells, and gain a better understanding of its importance,” he says.

He had seven sites he was visiting with the team of undergraduate volunteers three times this summer.

“We are quantifying the availability of water of different forms in these canyons – both natural sources and burro-well water.

“As the summer progresses, and surface water dries up, we are interested in quantifying how important burro-wells become in maintaining access to this limiting resource.

“We are also installing camera traps at each of these sites – on burro-wells, on natural water features, and on adjacent dry areas as natural controls.

Burros near a spot to make a new water hole.
Burros get ready to make a new water hole.

“We are hoping then to be able to quantify how other animals use these burro-dug features relative to other spaces and resources.”

The team would also conduct experiments at each site to test how the availability of water through the burro-wells may alter food web dynamics.

“Many desert species can tolerate the absence of surface water because they can extract water from their food,” Lundgren explains.

“However, this leads to escalations in interactions – predators consume more prey, herbivores consume more green herbage versus senescent [older] brown herbage.”

This escalation in interaction strength, as ecologists term it, can lead to unstable population dynamics in both the consumed and the consumer, and to population collapses.

A vegetation nursery from a burro well.
Burro wells are effective vegetation nurseries.

“To test how burros, by digging wells, influence this, we are conducting a ‘cafeteria’ experiment – offering invertebrate herbivores fresh leaves (high in water) and dry leaves in areas around burro-wells and in areas without surface water.

“The herbivores’ choice will indicate how water is driving their consumption decisions.”

Should he get enough funding to allow full-time research next summer, he hoped to employ a drone, instead of surveying on foot, to measure the availability of water through the entire season.

“I would then have the time to answer more nuanced questions – how do burro-wells influence the movement patterns of other desert species? How do communities of arthropods and rodents differ between areas with burro-wells and areas where burros are not present?

“Unfortunately, these questions cannot be answered without treating this research as a full-time job.”

Lundgren notes that burros, as an introduced species, were commonly described by the scientific community as “scourges”.

“Nearly all primary scientific effect-studies about them focus on how burros overgraze and outcompete native species,” he says.

He said these studies had failed to yield generalizable understandings because of weak methodologies and their failure to consider the ecological context of apex predator control.

Lundgren would welcome any further contributions via his crowdfunding page to help with future research into the well-digging and what he calls the unseen ecology of the wild burro.

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Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualPlanned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual. This is the ideal squeal to A Handbook for Ranch Managers.  Although the ecological principles remain the same, what was originally known as “The Savory Grazing Method” now answers to a multitude of different names: ranching for profit, holistic management, managed grazing, mob grazing, management intensive grazing, etc. Land & Livestock International, Inc. uses “Restoration Grazing” under its “Managing the Ranch as a Business” program.” No mater what you call it, this summary and synopsis will guide you step by step through the process and teach you how to use it as it was originally intended. No more excuses for failing to complete your grazing plans.

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The Same Gov’t That Spies on Its Citizens is Lecturing Facebook CEO for Same Thing

Flyover-Press.com

Members of the same government that is responsible for violating privacy laws and illegally collecting data from its citizens, openly lectured the CEO of a company for violating privacy laws and illegally collecting data from its users—a case of irony that could only play out in a country that brags about the unprecedented freedom enjoyed by its citizens.

 Combat Shooter's HandbookThe modern nation-state operates very similar to a large, well organized mafia. They commit the most violent of crimes on a massive scale and a daily basis—crimes that they would lock the rest of us up for. They commit armed robbery and extortion and get by with it by calling it “taxation” and by convincing us that we are paying our “fair share” of all those valuable services they purport to The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfitsprovide. They get by with slavery by calling it “conscription.” They are counterfeiters but they call it “stimulating the economy”…

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The Stories That Government Is Afraid To Tell

Ah yes, the land of the leech and the home of the slave. — jtl, 419

News and commentary that will shatter your illusion of knowledge. NewsWithViews.com is updated daily with columns by writers such as Devvy Kidd, Kelleigh Nelson…

Source: The Stories That Government Is Afraid To Tell

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How ‘Democracy’ hides American fascism

This is just one of many examples of how a contamination of the language has been used in the destruction of American liberty and Western Culture. Another is the word “liberal.”

I enjoy shocking people by telling them that I am a “liberal.” But I promptly explain that I am a liberal of the same variety as was Thomas Jefferson and Adam Smith–small (if any at all) government guys. The word is used today to identify the tax and spend folks and their political correctness brought about by their collectivism.

So what happened? Simple. The socialists-communists-fascists-collectivists stole the term…along with many others. George Orwell was an optimist. — jtl, 419

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Our 2018 fascism is so advanced over Nazi Germany and fascist Italy of World War II that our system actually appears benevolent… How could this happen? The answer is reverse semantics. Every writer and every commentator in America refers to the U.S. as a democracy of free enterprise capitalism with individual privacy and property rights. This is a big laugh to any sober person.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)This is just one of many examples of how a contamination of the language has been a key factory in the destruction of American liberty. Another is the word “liberal.”

I enjoy shocking people by telling them that I am a “liberal.” But I promptly explain that I am a liberal of the same variety as was  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2)  Thomas Jefferson and Adam Smith–small (if any at all) government guys. The word is used today to identify the tax and spend folks and their political correctness…

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The Disaster of Federal Farm Policy

Congress is now working on a new farm bill to cover the next four years handouts. The odds of budgetary decency breaking out are slim and none – and “Slim just left town,” as Dan Rather liked to say. But the perennial failures of farm programs remain one of the starkest reminders of why Washington’s power and spending needs to be radically slashed across the board.

 

A Handbook for Ranch Managers  With the exception of the military, American agriculture is the biggest welfare recipient on earth. — jtl, 419

by James Bovard at the Mises Wire

Someone once defined metaphysics as searching in a dark room for a black cat that isn’t there. For the last 35 years in Washington, I have been searching for rational government policies. And, like that black cat, I’m starting to doubt that it is actually there.

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualBut what I find on a regular basis is the notion that “Washington knows best.” The arrogance of policymakers is stunning – and it continues regardless of how many debacles they uncork.

Federal policies are far more irrational, wasteful, and oppressive than they are usually portrayed. Leviathan has been greatly aided by a mainstream media that often utterly fails to understand the programs or interventions – and is accustomed to being spoonfed by politicians and government flacks.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewI had been sniping in DC at federal agencies for a couple years before the day I picked up my Washington Post one morning in early 1983 and saw a banner headline announcing that the feds were planning to shut down 78 million acres of farmland that year.

Here was a mystery – because everyone knew that Ronald Reagan was a champion of free enterprise. I couldn’t help suspecting that there was a story here.

Combat Shooter's Handbook Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsNow, keep in mind – federal farm programs had started 50 years before – in response to market failure. FDR’s Brain trust decided that there was something intrinsic in markets for crops that prevented them from working. FDR’s Agriculture Secretary said that a farm dictator was needed to fix the problem. The primary evidence that markets had failed was that crop prices were not as high as politicians thought they should be. So the feds intervened to fix it. And since it worked out well for politicians, they kept fixing it every year for the next half century.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) By early 1983, farm programs were a total trainwreck. In 1981, Congress passed a farm bill to govern agriculture for the next four years. Five year plans worked out fine for Stalin, so why not a four year plan to control US farmers?

But Congress got a few details wrong. Congress expected inflation to keep roaring along so price supports for major crops rose each year. The Federal Reserve hit the brakes on the money supply and inflation slowed faster than almost anybody but Ron Paul and Lew Rockwell expected.

By late 1982, the United States had huge grain surpluses and exports were plummeting because federal price supports made American crops uncompetitive on world markets. Farmers could earn more by dumping their harvest on USDA instead of selling it in the marketplace. Farm program costs quickly doubled and USDA was stuck with the largest government-owned crop surpluses in history.

So the Reagan administration launched the Payment in Kind program to counteract the boneheaded signals sent by other farm programs. PIK gave farmers $25 billion worth of surplus crops to sway them to idle their land – in addition to $50 billion in other handouts that year. [Subsidies converted to current $s] The 78 million acres that were shut down was more than double the entire land mass of Alabama – or the entire states of Ohio, Indiana, and much of Illinois.

The previous year, I had read several good books on the history and follies of agricultural policy – including one by Bill Peterson, a friend of mine who I’m happy to see was honored by a special panel at AERC. I started writing about this farm shutdown and eventually snagged an assignment from Readers Digest – which meant that I no longer had to go to the pawn shop to pay rent. But that’s another story.

Politicians thought PIK was great because farmers were the salt of the earth and bombarding them with handouts was like subsidizing American virtue. But almost nobody in DC cared about the collateral damage this program inflicted. Shutting down all that farmland wiped out a quarter million jobs for farm laborers and farm-related businesses at a time when the nation was struggling to recover from the worst recession since World War Two. Across the Midwest, hundreds of fertilizer, farm-equipment, and seed dealers had to close shop because PIK cut their sales by up to 50 percent. And the cutback in harvests – combined with a drought that Washington failed to forecast – spurred a spike in feedgrain prices that bankrupted vast numbers of unsubsidized poultry, cattle, and pork producers.

But USDA Secretary Block proclaimed PIK “the most successful farm program in history.” Since I was writing a piece for a large circulation magazine, his staff grudgingly allowed me to interview him. .

Block was a West Point graduate and a successful hog farmer who once described himself as “a country boy on loan to the Department of Agriculture.” I thought of telling him I was just a “country boy on loan to Reader’s Digest” but I kept my mouth shut.

Block was affable and stayed friendly despite my edgy questions. When I pushed Block on why the feds were shutting down so many acres, Block stressed the need “to avoid starving farmers off the land.” But farmers were worth ten times more than other Americans, and that didn’t explain why many farmers were paid triple by the feds for not planting, compared to what they could have harvested from a crop.

Block said PIK was necessary because the “federal government must move toward a more market-oriented agricultural policy.” I asked then how come Reagan signed that bill in late 1982 boosting crop price supports even higher, thereby making farmers more dependent on the government?

Block was puzzled and he denied that any such law had been passed. His portly press secretary sitting by his right hand squirmed as if someone had just broken wind, leaned towards Block, and said softly: “I think he is referring to the provisions in last September’s Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act.” Block shrugged. I paused, expecting an answer – and then realized that I might not hear anything until the cows come home.

The contradictions in the policy never seemed to register with Block. Maybe that was why he was nominated for the job.

PIK didn’t make a lick of sense but it became the prototype for the rest of the 1980s. USDA kept paying farmers to idle more than 70 million acres – as federal policymaker continued to have one foot on the accelerator and one foot on the brake. It was easier for politicians to shut down American agriculture than to untangle self-defeating federal farm policies. There were endless surpluses of subsidized crops because politicians decided that market-clearing prices were a luxury that America could not afford – at least an election time.

Between the start of the Reagan administration and 1995, consumers and taxpayers have been forced to pay more than $370 billion for handouts for farmers. For the same amount of money, the federal government could have bought all the farmland in 41 states.

Obviously, something had to change. So in 1996, the Republican Congress pass the Freedom to Farm Act – a law that was loudly hailed by conservative Washington think tanks and some conservative editorial pages. That bill was very popular with reformers because it ended subsidies. Or so it said. Actually, it replaced old-fashioned handouts with “market transition payments.” The Freedom to Farm act actually tripled subsidies compared to what farmers would have received under prior law. Wheat farmers got 50 times more in subsidies for their 1996 crop than they would have received if Congress had merely extended existing farm programs. “Market transition payments” were popular with farmers, so Congress extended them and eventually dropped any pretense of ending subsidies.

Congress is now working on a new farm bill to cover the next four years handouts. The odds of budgetary decency breaking out are slim and none – and “Slim just left town,” as Dan Rather liked to say. But the perennial failures of farm programs remain one of the starkest reminders of why Washington’s power and spending needs to be radically slashed across the board.

 

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Combat Shooter's Handbook Combat Shooter’s Handbook. Call for a pizza, a cop, and an  ambulance and see which one arrives first. So, who does that leave to protect you, your life, property and family? The one and only answer is: YOU This Handbook is intended to help you exercise that right and meet that responsibility. Available in both paperback and Kindle versions.

 

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4/9/65

If we will only educate and pass our culture down to our progeny, we will never stop fighting until we are free. — jtl, 419

Flyover-Press.com

Of course, most astute followers of our history realize that the War really solved nothing and that even though the shooting part of the War has abated for now, the cultural phase of the War has been cranking up since the advent of “reconstruction” and has now reached almost fever pitch, as the Yankee/Marxists now feel they have us down for the count along with most of our monuments and flags.

The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsIf we will only educate and pass our culture down to our progeny, we will never stop fighting until we are free. — jtl, 419

From revisedhistory by Al Benson Jr.

Member, Board of Directors, Confederate Society of America

Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps InstituteWell, today is the 153rd anniversary of Robert E. Lee’s surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia at Appomattox Court House in Virginia.

This event, so we are told, ended the “Civil War.” As far as the professional “historians” and…

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Arrest-Proof Yourself

Yep, George Orwell was an optimist. — jtl, 419

Flyover-Press.com

Heck, all people should read this book. It will open your eyes to the fact that a very small percentage of those being arrested are actually criminally minded. There is much that you have no clue about and that, well that not knowing can get you and arrest record you’ll regret. “Ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure”, and in this case it can mean not paying out thousands to bail bondsmen, attorneys and who knows what other costs.
The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsYep, George Orwell was an optimist. — jtl, 419
Wow, just wow.
There has been a lot of talk in the media, social websites, and video sites about certain things going on that may seem puzzling or down right confusing to the average citizen of the United States.
Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps InstituteIf you want a view into the attitudes and point of view of the average law enforcement person, you’ll get it…

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Swamp’s lynch mob out to get EPA’s Scott Pruitt

Pruitt is by far President Trump’s most effective subordinate. No wonder the swamp wants to get rid of him.
A Handbook for Ranch ManagersYears ago John Hawley (of the Texas Libertarian Party) told an inexperienced me that, “as long as you are not a threat to them, they’ll leave you alone. But, when you get to be a threat, if they can’t get something on you, they’ll just make something up.” Old John was a wise man. — jtl, 419
 Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual   Anytime the swamp is in an uproar, demanding someone’s head on a platter, you can bet there is mischief afoot. But it’s not the dastardly deeds allegedly committed by the target of the swamp’s ire that’s the real outrage; it’s those casting the stones who are the true miscreants.

 

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewEPA Administrator Scott Pruitt is said to be entangled in “serious” ethics violations and to be wasting taxpayer money on extravagant trips and bloated security details. The Sierra Club, members of Congress, including a smattering of thoroughly misguided Republicans, and the mainstream media – all profess to be appalled at Pruitt’s behavior.

Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits Combat Shooter's HandbookThey complain that Pruitt, whose home is in Oklahoma, rented a small Capitol Hill condo for $1,500 a month from February to July 2017. The condo is co-owned by a woman who is a healthcare lobbyist with no business before EPA. Her husband, who has no share in the condo, owns a lobbying company which has represented energy companies but has had no clients with business before EPA during the Trump administration. EPA’s principal deputy general counsel has reviewed the terms of the lease and concluded it did “not constitute a prohibited gift.” In other words, there’s no there there.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) Pruitt, along with his security detail, is charged with running up a $120,000 tab for a trip to a G-7 meeting in Italy last summer, as well for a $40,000 trip to Morocco. In truth, we would all be better of if neither Pruitt nor anyone else from the administration had attended the useless G-7 meeting, but such sojourns, however wasteful, are nothing new. Lisa Jackson, Obama’s first EPA administrator, rang up $332,000 in charges for four international trips between 2009 and 2013. Her successor, Gina McCarthy, let the good times roll to the tune of $630,000 between 2013 and 2017 for ten international junkets. Not a peep from the swamp.

Citing the nearly $3 million price tag, the Washington Post recently railed against the “unprecedented level of security that has surrounded Pruitt since shortly after he arrived at the agency.” What is also unprecedented are the intensity and number of threats made against Pruitt. How serious these threats are is a matter of speculation. But Pruitt has rained on the parade of an environmental movement which is not without its extremist elements, as the vandalism and occasional violence of last year’s anti-pipeline protests attest. And he has incurred the wrath of the Climate Industrial Complex, which has a huge financial stake in in perpetuating the myth of human-induced global warming.

Pruitt’s Real Sin: Cleaning Up EPA

In just over a year in office, Pruitt has transformed EPA from what was easily the most corrupt agency in the federal government into one that is narrowly focused on carrying out its original mission. Indeed, his accomplishments are remarkable:

  • Pruitt rescinded the Obama-era “Waters of the United States” (WOTUS) rule, which would have subjected millions of acres of private land across the country to federal zoning.
  • Pruitt strongly supported U.S. withdrawal from the December 2015 Paris Climate Change accords, which would have crippled American energy production.
  • Pruitt ended EPA’s practice is using “secret science” to justify new rules and regulations. No longer are the underlying data used to support regulatory actions off limits to public scrutiny.
  • Pruitt has cleansed EPA’s scientific advisory boards of people who advise the agency on regulatory actions while simultaneously receiving EPA grants.
  • Pruitt has begun reforming EPA’s Byzantine New Source Review process, which, upon completion, will allow for much faster permitting of new manufacturing and other commercial facilities while opening the door to more innovative approaches to reducing emissions.
  • Pruitt has brought long-overdue reform to EPA’s hopelessly wasteful Superfund program, with the goal of cleaning up contaminated sites and returning them to the communities in which they are located and doing so in a timely fashion that no longer lines the pockets of lawyers and remediation contractors.

In undertaking these steps, not to mention those yet to come, Pruitt is not only restoring integrity to an agency that had become used to running roughshod over the rights of the people and entities it regulated. He has also attacked the cronyism, corruption, and institutional dishonesty of environmental organizations, purveyors of “green” solutions to problems that, in some cases, don’t exist, and their well-heeled financial support network anchored on both coasts.

Pruitt is by far President Trump’s most effective subordinate. No wonder the swamp wants to get rid of him.

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A Handbook for Ranch ManagersA Handbook for Ranch Managers.  In keeping with the “holistic” idea that the land, the livestock, the people and the money should be viewed as a single integrated whole: Part I deals with the management of the natural resources. Part II covers livestock production and Part III deals with the people and the money. Not only would this book make an excellent basic text for a university program in Ranch Management, no professional ranch manager’s reference bookshelf should be without it. It is a comprehensive reference manual for managing the working ranch. The information in the appendices and extensive bibliography alone is worth the price of the book.

You might also be interested in the supplement to this Handbook: Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual.

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White House considering proposal that could strip protections from hundreds of threatened species: report

 Donald J. Trump wearing a suit and tie smiling at the camera
© Provided by The Hill

 

The White House is reportedly looking into a proposal that some warn could strip protections for hundreds of threatened species.

Would that not be a boon to our ranching community? Ou rah! — jtl, 419
by Rebecca Savransky via The Hill

 

The proposal is called “Removal of Blanket Section 4(d) Rule,” CNN reported, citing a government database.

The blanket rule has been used by the Fish and Wildlife Service to cover hundreds of threatened animal and plant species that are at risk of becoming endangered.

A spokesman for the Fish and Wildlife Service said it is false to say the rule would strip the protections and noted it is a “draft” that is “under internal review.”

“Any proposed changes will go through a full and transparent public review process that provides ample opportunity for interested parties to provide input that we will consider to help us ensure these regulations are effective in furthering the [Endangered Species Act’s] ultimate goal — recovery of our most imperiled species to the point they no longer need federal protection,” Gavin Shire said in a statement to CNN.

The proposal has reportedly been sent to a White House office for consideration.

Noah Greenwald – who leads the endangered species project at the Center for Biological Diversity, an environmental group – said the Trump administration has “more aggressively moved to roll back regulations for air, water and wildlife than any other administration.”

He noted that oil and agriculture companies could benefit if the protections are stripped, as they are now prohibited from harming the habitats of threatened species.

The Fish and Wildlife Service can decide to write specific protections for species that are threatened or they can cover the species with blanket rule protections, according to CNN. Currently, about 300 species are covered with blanket rule protections.

The proposal comes after reports that President Trump’s appointee to oversee wildlife and parks at the Interior Department has a history of opposing endangered species protections.

Susan Combs, who was recently appointed as acting assistant secretary for fish, wildlife and parks, has in the past compared the endangered species listings to “incoming Scud missiles.”

Land and Livestock International, Inc. is in a position to assist the buyer in purchasing ranches like these anywhere in the Western United States and Northern Mexico. Pre – purchase services include help with due diligence, estimates of carrying capacity and potential for improvement, cash flow projections, etc. Post purchase services include everything from part time consulting to complete turn-key management.

Contact us at info@landandlivestockinternational.com or through our web site at www.landandlivestockinternational.com

Dripping Springs
Mule Creek, Grant County, New Mexico

The Dripping Springs Ranch is a highly improved working cattle ranch in a very desirable part of southwest New Mexico. Access to the Ranch from State Route 78 is excellent, and it is an easy drive to either Silver City, N. or Safford, Az. 232 deeded acres, 13,000 USFS acres, 150 AU. $2,500,000

Walking L Ranch
Wickenburg, Yavapai County

The Walking L Ranch’s 52+ square miles adjoin Wickenburg from the Hassayamapa River into the Wickenburg Mountains. The ranch originally consisted of the 10X Ranch on the south end and the Rincon Ranch on the north end.  The old Rincon Dude Ranch was added to the ranch’s Headquarters by the current owner. The ranch’s land tenure consists of deeded land, State and BLM Grazing Leases.  Topography is rolling to steep with elevation’s ranging from 2,100’ along the river to over 2,700’ on San Domingo Peak.  The ranch borders US 60 on the south side of Wickenburg.  The ranch’s deeded land is in seven non-contiguous parcels throughout the ranch.  The headquarters consists of 110.88 deeded acres on Rincon Road and the Hassayampa River with approximately 30 acres irrigated.  Another headquarters for the 10X is on the state lease. $5,000,000

Dos S Inholding
Fountain Hills, Maricopa County

The Dos S is a 22.78 acre private inholding surrounded by Tonto National Forest on Sycamore Creek.  It is located just off the Beeline Highway behind a locked gate 20 miles from the Shea Boulevard & Highway 87 intersection at Fountain Hills.  Payson is 40 miles to the north. $1,025,100

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