Governors Ask USDA for Wildfire Relief Action

The governors of Oklahoma, Texas, Kansas and New Mexico sent a letter Friday to acting Secretary of Agriculture Mike Young asking that restrictions to the CRP be lifted to provide more land for grazing.

A Handbook for Ranch Managers There is one sure way to destroy a perfectly good grassland–take all the grazers off of it. — jtl, 419

There are cost-share programs available for livestock producers to rebuild fences lost to fire.
There are cost-share programs available for livestock producers to rebuild fences lost to fire.

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual  The governors from four states affected by wildifres are seeking temporary suspension of grazing restrictions in the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) for farmers and ranchers because of wildfires.

The governors of Oklahoma, Texas, Kansas and New Mexico sent a letter Friday to acting Secretary of Agriculture Mike Young asking that restrictions to the CRP be lifted to provide more land for grazing. The fires have burned more than 2,300 square miles in the four states, forcing farmers and ranchers to move their livestock.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View  “These fires have also devastated critical infrastructure, including fencing, on farms and ranches in our states,” the governors wrote. “The Emergency Conservation Program provides critical financial resources to affected farmers and ranchers to rebuild fences. We urge the Farm Service Agency to expedite the implementation of the Emergency Conservation program in our states.”

Combat Shooter's Handbook According to the agency, emergency grazing of CRP land is authorized under certain conditions to provide relief to livestock producers due to some natural disasters.

Cost-share up to 75% will be available to restore livestock fences if the Emergency Conservation Program (ECP) is renewed. To get the most benefit from ECP, landowners should contact FSA before rebuilding fence.

Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsThe Kansas Livestock Association is urging ranchers to immediately notify their local Farm Service Agency (FSA) office of livestock, fence and feed losses. Notification can come in the form of a phone call, email or in person.

Combat Shooter's Handbook The key to qualifying for any of these programs is documenting losses. USDA recommends photographs, video or veterinary records to verify losses. Purchase, production and financial records could serve as additional documentation.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)

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Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualPlanned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual. This is the ideal squeal to A Handbook for Ranch Managers.  Although the ecological principles remain the same, what was originally known as “The Savory Grazing Method” now answers to a multitude of different names: ranching for profit, holistic management, managed grazing, mob grazing, management intensive grazing, etc. Land & Livestock International, Inc. uses “Restoration Grazing” under its “Managing the Ranch as a Business” program.” No mater what you call it, this summary and synopsis will guide you step by step through the process and teach you how to use it as it was originally intended. No more excuses for failing to complete your grazing plans.

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Efficient and Novel Method for Sorting Cow-Calf Pairs

 

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)

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A Handbook for Ranch ManagersA Handbook for Ranch Managers.  In keeping with the “holistic” idea that the land, the livestock, the people and the money should be viewed as a single integrated whole: Part I deals with the management of the natural resources. Part II covers livestock production and Part III deals with the people and the money. Not only would this book make an excellent basic text for a university program in Ranch Management, no professional ranch manager’s reference bookshelf should be without it. It is a comprehensive reference manual for managing the working ranch. The information in the appendices and extensive bibliography alone is worth the price of the book.

You might also be interested in the supplement to this Handbook: Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual.

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Congress Created the Spying Monster

Please read this article by Judge Napolitano. You will discover that we are much deeper in the dark pit of the tyranny of a police state than even the most skeptical of us imagined. It is time boys. — jtl, 419

Source: Congress Created the Spying Monster

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The Deep-State Insurgency

“…now we’re learning that the Orwellian nightmare of myopic control over us as a national population is far worse than ever imagined.”

I may slap the next son-of-a-bitch that tries to tell me “what a free country we live in.” — jtl, 419

Source: The Deep-State Insurgency

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Two Stage Calf Weaning

I recall from my “younger” days, the ranch we lived on weaned in corals that were near the house. Not only did the weaning stress the cattle, it stressed the cowboys as well. There was never any sleep that night. — jtl, 419

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersLand & Livestock International, Inc is offering a “Free” week-long ranch manageme nt-planned grazing seminar-workshop.

What follows is a business model we have been following that has worked very well for us and for our clientele.

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualWe are seeking individual ranchers to sponsor/host workshops. The sponsor/host (and spouse or key employee) get the training at his/her ranch for no charge. This is an extra special benefit to the host as his/her land will be used for the “lab” work and hands on demonstrations. This provides a great start in the implementation of his/her program.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewIn return, he/she takes care of the logistics involved in putting on the event. This includes arranging for the venue, booking a block of rooms for lodging, arranging for meals (if any), putting out the advertising, setting and collecting the fees and so forth.

We are then responsible for putting on the workshop.

During the interim we will each keep track of our out of pocket costs (from our end, that will be mostly travel and lodging). Then, when it is all over, we both are reimbursed our out of pocket costs and split any funds remaining 50:50.

If this sounds like something you might be interested in, click here and let us know. If the link won’t work for you, copy and paste info@landandlivestockinternational.com into your browser.

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Ryan Zinke Is the Only Trump Administrator Having Any Fun Right Now

Newly confirmed Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke would rather hop out of bed and ride a horse to work—which is what he did on his first full day in office on March 2.
A Handbook for Ranch ManagersA cowboy for an Interior Secretary…it’s about time. — jtl, 419
By Ari Phillips via slate.com

He’s happily spent his first week riding a horse to work and decorating his office. Oh, and obliterating important regulations.

New Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke
New Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke tips his cowboy hat after riding in on horseback for his first day of work at the Interior Department in Washington on March 2.

Tami Heilemann/Department of Interior/Handout/Reuters

This story was first published on Fusion and is reprinted here with permission from Climate Desk.

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualFollowing the news of President Trump’s unpredictable first weeks in office is draining enough, imagine being part and parcel to the action? While some of Trump’s inner circle seems to derive energy from all the chaos and turmoil, it’s safe to say that most federal employees are sitting tight and probably losing sleep. Trump has proposed major cuts to a number of important domestic programs, and Congress isn’t providing much reassurance in the way of stability. It’s as if every day’s agenda is driven by Trump’s tweets, which are in turn driven by what’s on morning television. No wonder some of us would rather stay in bed.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewNewly confirmed Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke would rather hop out of bed and ride a horse to work—which is what he did on his first full day in office on March 2. Zinke, who was confirmed by one of the most generous margins of the Trump administration, 68 to 31, was a U.S. representative from Montana before being nominated to his new post. He now leads a department that manages a fifth of the land in the United States, about 500 million surface acres, plus a lot more underground in the form of natural resources.

Combat Shooter's HandbookWhile Zinke is not an outright climate change denier in the vein of some of his Cabinet counterparts and has expressed his opposition to selling off federal lands—two highly controversial standpoints that have entered the GOP mainstream—liberals are worried that he will prioritize public land use and development over environmental conservation and biological diversity.

Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute Environmental groups are especially wary of Zinke’s intentions and have vowed to keep a close eye on him. After his confirmation, 350.org executive director May Boeve said in a statement that:

Once again, the Trump administration is stacking their cards in favor of the fossil fuel industry. Zinke is another climate science-denier with ties to Big Oil who won’t lift a finger for real climate action. His agenda will put communities in danger and, if the coal moratorium is lifted, would spell disaster for the climate. People across the country have been resisting the fossil fuel industry’s grasp on public lands for years, and we’ll continue fighting to keep fossil fuels in the ground.

The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsGreenpeace USA climate and energy campaigner Diana Best said that unlike Trump, “Zinke can string a coherent sentence together, but don’t be fooled. As Interior Secretary, Zinke will sell out the American people for corporate interests in no time, giving away more public lands to private development, undermining efforts to modernize the federal leasing program, and compromising the Interior’s charter to manage lands to serve the interests of all Americans.”

If Zinke is ruffled by the opposition, he hasn’t shown it. Since being confirmed, he’s made quick moves to give more agency to hunters and fishers on public lands. His first directive in office was to repeal an Obama administration directive that barred the use of lead ammunition and fishing tackle in national parks and wildlife refuges. He also signed an order directing bureaus and agencies that manage federal land to look for ways to expand hunting, fishing, and recreation.

Over the past eight years “hunting, and recreation enthusiasts have seen trails closed and dramatic decreases in access to public lands across the board,” said Zinke in a statement. “It worries me to think about hunting and fishing becoming activities for the land-owning elite.”

That sounds like some Trumped-up populist rhetoric.

In a move likely to only increase environmental groups’ reservations about Zinke, on Monday he announced that the DOI will offer 73 million acres of offshore Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida for oil and gas exploration and development, saying that “opening more federal lands and waters to oil and gas drilling is a pillar of President Trump’s plan to make the United States energy independent.”

Seemingly satisfied with these directives for the time being, on Tuesday, Zinke tweeted out a stream of photos of him settling into his new office. While everyone else was pulling their hair out over Trumpcare and Obama wiretapping accusations, Zinke was setting out his knife collection. Who’s jealous?

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Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View

edited by

Dr Jimmy T (Gunny) LaBaume

Is now available in both PAPERBACK and Kindle

BookCoverImageMurray N. Rothbard was the father of what some call Radical Libertarianism or Anarcho-Capitalism which Hans-Hermann Hoppe described as “Rothbard’s unique contribution to the rediscovery of property and property rights as the common foundation of both economics and political philosophy, and the systematic reconstruction and conceptual integration of modern, marginalist economics and natural-law political philosophy into a unified moral science: libertarianism.”

This book applies the principles of this “unified moral science” to environmental and natural resource management issues.

The book started out life as an assigned reading list for a university level course entitled Environmental and Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View.

As I began to prepare to teach the course, I quickly saw that there was a plethora of textbooks suitable for universal level courses dealing with environmental and natural resource economics. The only problem was that they were all based in mainstream neo-classical (or Keynesian) theory. I could find no single collection of material comprising a comprehensive treatment of environmental and natural resource economics based on Austrian Economic Theory.

However, I was able to find a large number of essays, monographs, papers delivered at professional meetings and published from a multitude of sources. This book is the result. It is composed of a collection of research reports and essays by reputable scientists, economists, and legal experts as well as private property and free market activists.

The book is organized into seven parts: I. Environmentalism: The New State Religion; II. The New State Religion Debunked; III. Introduction to Environmental and Natural Resource Economics; IV. Interventionism: Law and Regulation; V. Pollution and Recycling; VI. Property Rights: Planning, Zoning and Eminent Domain; and VII. Free Market Conservation. It also includes an elaborate Bibliography, References and Recommended Reading section including an extensive Annotated Bibliography of related and works on the subject.

The intellectual level of the individual works ranges from quite scholarly to informed editorial opinion.

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The Deep State Risks Nuclear Armageddon

Source: The Deep State Risks Nuclear Armageddon

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Californio Vaquero vs Texas Cowpuncher

This video is a scene from Texas Cowpuncher Part One in the Vaquero Series. Cowboys like to argue over their own unique style of gear and roping. Waddie Mitchell and Buster McLaury provide entertaining highlights of the differences between Californio Vaqueros and Texas

 Land & Livestock International, Inc. is in a position to assist the buyer in purchasing ranches like these anywhere in the Western United States and Northern Mexico. Pre – purchase services include help with due diligence, estimates of carrying capacity and potential for improvement, cash flow projections, etc. Post purchase services include everything from part time consulting to complete turn-key management.

Contact us at info@landandlivestockinternational.com or through our web site at www.landandlivestockinternational.com

Dripping Springs
Mule Creek, Grant County, New Mexico

The Dripping Springs Ranch is a highly improved working cattle ranch in a very desirable part of southwest New Mexico. Access to the Ranch from State Route 78 is excellent, and it is an easy drive to either Silver City, N. or Safford, Az. 232 deeded acres, 13,000 USFS acres, 150 AU. $2,500,000

Walking L Ranch
Wickenburg, Yavapai County

The Walking L Ranch’s 52+ square miles adjoin Wickenburg from the Hassayamapa River into the Wickenburg Mountains. The ranch originally consisted of the 10X Ranch on the south end and the Rincon Ranch on the north end.  The old Rincon Dude Ranch was added to the ranch’s Headquarters by the current owner. The ranch’s land tenure consists of deeded land, State and BLM Grazing Leases.  Topography is rolling to steep with elevation’s ranging from 2,100’ along the river to over 2,700’ on San Domingo Peak.  The ranch borders US 60 on the south side of Wickenburg.  The ranch’s deeded land is in seven non-contiguous parcels throughout the ranch.  The headquarters consists of 110.88 deeded acres on Rincon Road and the Hassayampa River with approximately 30 acres irrigated.  Another headquarters for the 10X is on the state lease. $5,000,000

Dos S Inholding
Fountain Hills, Maricopa County

The Dos S is a 22.78 acre private inholding surrounded by Tonto National Forest on Sycamore Creek.  It is located just off the Beeline Highway behind a locked gate 20 miles from the Shea Boulevard & Highway 87 intersection at Fountain Hills.  Payson is 40 miles to the north. $1,025,100

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Guest Editorial: Solution to Mexican wolf issue is a new appellate court

Arizona is located in the notoriously large and unwieldy U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. Along with its crushing case backlog, the San Francisco-based court has a reputation for decisions that are decidedly outside of the legal mainstream, leading it to be overturned by the Supreme Court more than any other federal circuit.

And they are nothing but a bunch of little commie bitches. — jtl, 419

By U.S. Sen. Jeff Flake via The Copper Era

Cattle ranching is an essential part of our cultural heritage in Arizona, and it continues to play an important role in our state economy. Unfortunately, onerous regulations are making it harder for ranchers to stay in business.

I continue to hear from land users about the federal government’s general lack of coordination and cooperation with local stakeholders. For ranchers, a top concern is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s mishandling of the Mexican gray wolf recovery effort.

Species management is always a delicate balancing act, and it requires extensive consultation with the stakeholders that are most affected by changes to local ecosystems.

To address the declining numbers of Mexican gray wolves in Arizona and New Mexico, the wolf was listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act in 1976. The Fish and Wildlife Service went on to finalize the Mexican Gray Wolf Recovery Plan to return viable populations back to the wolf’s historic range.

This plan set a recovery goal of 100 wolves, a target that was exceeded in 2014. However, instead of celebrating the recovery plan’s success by delisting the wolf and returning management to the states, the federal government decided to move the goal posts.

It continues to manage the Mexican gray wolf under onerous Endangered Species Act requirements, harming ranchers and other rural Arizona stakeholders in the process.

This is a case study in what’s wrong with the Endangered Species Act. I agree that we should ensure viable species populations, but the law was never intended for species to be listed in perpetuity.

Since the Endangered Species Act was signed into law, more than 2,000 species have been listed as threatened or endangered. Yet in more than 40 years, less than one percent of these species have ever been removed from the list.

This isn’t because of the law’s failure to recover species; rather, it’s due to a bureaucratic reluctance to return species management to the states.

To establish a realistic path forward to delist the Mexican gray wolf that respects Arizona property owners, I introduced the Mexican Gray Wolf Recovery Plan Act. This legislation will require the Fish and Wildlife Service to work with state and local stakeholders in drafting an updated recovery plan that doesn’t adversely impact livestock, wild game or recreation.

The bill would reflect the reality that 90 percent of the wolf’s historic range is in Mexico, meaning that states like Arizona won’t be forced to shoulder an unfair burden of the recovery effort.

And since this legislation deals with wolves, I figured it should have some teeth.

Under the bill, achieving the recovery goal would trigger an automatic delisting, returning management of Mexican gray wolves to the states. If the Fish and Wildlife Service doesn’t comply with the updated recovery plan, state wildlife agencies would be empowered to assume management of wolf populations in accordance with the Endangered Species Act.

Holding the Fish and Wildlife Service accountable is critically important for rural Arizona, especially at a time when the federal government is challenging the fundamental principle of federalism with respect to species management throughout the West.

While most ranchers may not think of the Tenth Amendment or appellate courts when they spot a wolf on the edge of their family’s property, it turns out that the structure of our federal judiciary could not be more important for protecting rural Arizona’s way of life.

Arizona is located in the notoriously large and unwieldy U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. Along with its crushing case backlog, the San Francisco-based court has a reputation for decisions that are decidedly outside of the legal mainstream, leading it to be overturned by the Supreme Court more than any other federal circuit.

This denies rural Arizonans the swift access to justice promised by the Constitution and removes an important judicial check on federal land management agencies when they exceed their legal authority. To provide Arizona with the same legal recourse enjoyed by other states in the event of executive overreach, such as the Fish and Wildlife Service’s unlawful release of captive-born wolves in New Mexico, I introduced legislation to break up the Ninth Circuit.

The Judicial Administration and Improvement Act will create a new Twelfth Circuit by moving Arizona, Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, and Washington out of the Ninth Circuit. Doing so would establish stronger local, regional and cultural ties, while also ensuring a more timely and accurate judicial process for both circuits.

Rural Arizonans have put up with overreaching executive agencies and a complicit judiciary for long enough. These two bills will ease bureaucratic burdens and restore faith in our judicial system.

Flake is the junior senator for Arizona.

Land and Livestock International, Inc. is  in a position to assist the buyer in purchasing ranches like these anywhere in the Western United States and Northern Mexico. Pre – purchase services include help with due diligence, estimates of carrying capacity and potential for improvement, cash flow projections, etc. Post purchase services include everything from part time consulting to complete turn-key management.

Contact us at info@landandlivestockinternational.com or through our web site at www.landandlivestockinternational.com

Dripping Springs
Mule Creek, Grant County, New Mexico

The Dripping Springs Ranch is a highly improved working cattle ranch in a very desirable part of southwest New Mexico. Access to the Ranch from State Route 78 is excellent, and it is an easy drive to either Silver City, N. or Safford, Az. 232 deeded acres, 13,000 USFS acres, 150 AU. $2,500,000

Walking L Ranch
Wickenburg, Yavapai County

The Walking L Ranch’s 52+ square miles adjoin Wickenburg from the Hassayamapa River into the Wickenburg Mountains. The ranch originally consisted of the 10X Ranch on the south end and the Rincon Ranch on the north end.  The old Rincon Dude Ranch was added to the ranch’s Headquarters by the current owner. The ranch’s land tenure consists of deeded land, State and BLM Grazing Leases.  Topography is rolling to steep with elevation’s ranging from 2,100’ along the river to over 2,700’ on San Domingo Peak.  The ranch borders US 60 on the south side of Wickenburg.  The ranch’s deeded land is in seven non-contiguous parcels throughout the ranch.  The headquarters consists of 110.88 deeded acres on Rincon Road and the Hassayampa River with approximately 30 acres irrigated.  Another headquarters for the 10X is on the state lease. $5,000,000

Dos S Inholding
Fountain Hills, Maricopa County

The Dos S is a 22.78 acre private inholding surrounded by Tonto National Forest on Sycamore Creek.  It is located just off the Beeline Highway behind a locked gate 20 miles from the Shea Boulevard & Highway 87 intersection at Fountain Hills.  Payson is 40 miles to the north. $1,025,100

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Court rules Hage family must pay $587K for grazing cattle on federal land in Nevada

“The federal government is going after all kinds of property,” Hage said. “Not just our property rights. This is a bellweather that they don’t want private property rights out there. They are extinguishing them as fast as they can.”

A Handbook for Ranch ManagersAnd, from what little I can gather with respect to Trump’s knowledge of and interest in public lands in the West (he has delegated most of that to his son who doesn’t know his ass from a hole in the ground about public lands), I’m afraid this is going to be one of the swamps that won’t get much draining.

Think secession. — jtl, 419

img
Rancher Wayne Hage Sr. is shown in this November 1997 file photo, taken near the spot where federal agents seized 100 head of his cattle in 1991, in Meadow Canyon near Tonopah. (AP)
 Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual By SEAN WHALEY via LAS VEGAS REVIEW-JOURNAL
CARSON CITY — A U.S. District Court judge has ordered a Nevada ranching family engaged in a long-running dispute with federal agencies to pay $587,000 for grazing cattle on BLM and Forest Service lands without permission.

The order dated Feb. 27 from Gloria Navarro, chief judge of the Las Vegas District Court, also requires the son of the late Wayne Hage to remove any livestock from federal lands within 30 days. Within 45 days the Hage has to file a statement of compliance with the order or face contempt of court.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewThe order, which names Hage’s son, Wayne N. Hage, was the result of a 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals decision issued last year that overturned a lower court ruling in favor of the Hage family. The 9th circuit court directed the Las Vegas court to issue a new order complying with the appeals court findings in the decision.

That order was issued by Navarro on Monday.

Combat Shooter's Handbook Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsHage died in 2006, and the legal fight has been carried on by his family and son.

The order could bring an end a decades-long dispute that centered on the Hage family’s Pine Creek Ranch near Tonopah. The case is well known in the West and among property-rights advocates who continue to maintain that the federal government exercises a heavy hand in relations with those who make their livelihood off the land.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)  The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)  Navarro calculated the damages based on the number of cattle Hage grazed on the federal lands from 2004 to 2011. The Hage family also is permanently prohibited from putting their livestock on federal lands without permission.

HAGE REACTION

Wayne N. Hage said the decision was not a surprise.

“We were expecting it,” he said. “I think you are going to find a lot of joyous bureaucrats today.”

Hage said he does not have livestock on the lands in question, but he declined to say if he can pay the fine or how he may proceed legally, if at all.

Hage said Navarro’s order means the family’s stock watering rights are an illusion. The family has water rights on the land in dispute but they could not be accessed because their livestock was not allowed on the federal lands, he said.

“If it is not a taking then they have destroyed every stock water right in Nevada,” Hage said.

“The federal government is going after all kinds of property,” Hage said. “Not just our property rights. This is a bellweather that they don’t want private property rights out there. They are extinguishing them as fast as they can.”

RANCHERS VS. BLM

The Hage case preceded the more recent confrontation between federal agencies and Bunkerville rancher Cliven Bundy. The BLM’s efforts to round up cattle belonging to Bundy in 2014 resulted in an armed confrontation between federal agents and Bundy supporters that ultimately ended peacefully.

Members of the Bundy family are on trial in U.S. District Court in Las Vegas on charges relating to the standoff.

The Hage case has a long and complicated history, but the recent ruling is the result of a 2013 decision by a federal judge that was overturned on appeal.

In May 2013 U.S. District Judge Robert Clive Jones issued a 104-page opinion detailing what he called the federal government’s vindictive actions against the ranching family.

But the 9th circuit court reversed Jones and found in favor of the government claims that Hage was trespassing on public lands by grazing cattle without a permit. The court also criticized Jones, who is now on senior status, for his decision that “plainly” contravened federal law.

Contact Sean Whaley at swhaley@reviewjournal.com or 775-461-3820. Follow @seanw801 on Twitter.

 

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Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualPlanned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual. This is the ideal squeal to A Handbook for Ranch Managers.  Although the ecological principles remain the same, what was originally known as “The Savory Grazing Method” now answers to a multitude of different names: ranching for profit, holistic management, managed grazing, mob grazing, management intensive grazing, etc. Land & Livestock International, Inc. uses “Restoration Grazing” under its “Managing the Ranch as a Business” program.” No mater what you call it, this summary and synopsis will guide you step by step through the process and teach you how to use it as it was originally intended. No more excuses for failing to complete your grazing plans.

Posted in Public Lands Ranching, Uncategorized | Tagged , , | 1 Comment