Wintering Calves With Their Mamas Means Healthier Calves

By Heather Smith Thomas

By calving later in the spring and wintering those calves with their mothers, three North Dakota producers say they develop healthier, heavier calves at less cost.

Many stockmen are calving later in the year: April, May or June. Doing so offers the advantages of green grass and no need for harvested forage at a time when the cow’s nutritional needs are peaking, due to lactation.

But along with later calving typically comes later weaning. Some producers are choosing to winter calves with the cows, and wean at about 10 months of age in late February, March or early April to avoid early winter’s harsh weather.

North Dakota stories

Nick Faulkner of the Ruso Ranch near Garrison, ND, has wintered calves with their mothers for six years. The ranch weans calves two months before their dams are due to calve again.

“We calve 250 cows in late April, and it’s worked very well for us. We don’t have to give vaccinations for scours or other calf diseases,” he says. Plus, warm-weather calving on its own poses fewer problems for calves. And being on mother’s milk through winter, without the stress of weaning, seems to help keep calves healthy.

Faulkner monitors body condition on his cows in order to cull those unable to handle winter nursing. But he says his feeding program keeps most of them in good shape. That includes use of cover crops and haying. Even if some cows lose a little weight, most of them bounce back before calving, he adds.

“Wintering pairs together simplifies our winter feeding program. My father-in-law raised corn for silage for 30 years, and we no longer raise corn. We do more haying, but the calves go through winter much better on the cows than they do being weaned,” he says.

Faulkner retains his calves after weaning, running them as yearlings on grass and selling them in the fall. He says calves weaned in late February really bloom when they hit the grass. “The calves aren’t stressed at all by weaning, and about half are already weaned by their mothers,” he says.

He explains the calves learn eating habits from their mothers. “The longer you can keep them with their mothers, the better the calves will do,” he says.

Faulkner likes the low stress of fence-line weaning. “Within three days after we separate the pairs, few still bellow, and the calves are so content that they don’t care where they are.”

Jay and Krista Reiser of Washburn, ND, calve in May and June, winter the calves with their dams, and wean late in the following March, using fence-line weaning. The Reisers have always run their heifers with the cowherd, allowing them to learn from their mothers how to winter-graze, graze through snow, seek wind shelter, etc. “They get some smarts from the cows,” Krista says.

In previous years, the Reisers  sold all calves but the replacement heifers off the cows. The heifers are weaned using nose flaps, which allows them to stay at their mother’s side. Last fall, however, they kept all their calves on the cows through the winter, and fence-line weaned in the spring.

“We wanted to keep the calves on the cows longer, partly to allow the rumen to develop more fully before weaning. We heard Gearld Fry, an Arkansas stockman who has studied cattle nutrition and genetics for many years, speak at the Northern Plains Sustainable Ag Winter Workshop in February 2012. He told about research indicating it takes nearly 10 months for the rumen to develop to optimum potential for digesting forage. He thinks the beef industry is shortchanging itself with early weaning and putting calves on grain,” Jay says.

Another reason for leaving calves on the cows is the ease, as well as the savings of time and labor. “We wanted to run just one herd though winter, and let the cows worry about the calves. We didn’t have to treat any for sickness. When we did fence-line weaning in March, the weather was starting to get nice, and it was so easy,” Jay says.

Faulkner says he’s cutting winter feed costs. “We still run tractors but we’re doing a lot of bale-grazing, trying to reduce costs. With later weaning, the calves are eating with the cows — whether bale-grazing or pasture-grazing — rather than waiting for the truck to bring feed,” he says.

“We want our cattle to work for us, rather than us working for them. The biggest thing I’ve noticed about the later weaning is how much easier it is for all of us. We are having fewer problems and less sickness,” he says.

Plus, he adds, the former corn acreage converted to forage production is producing a high-quality grass without the expense of growing and feeding silage or grain.

Krista Reiser says that from a labor and fuel standpoint, keeping calves on the cows rather than feeding two groups saves money. She admits, however, that the decision to wean calves and feed them separately or keep them with the cows depends on the situation.

The important thing, she says, is to weigh the income and outflow. If you can save enough money on winter feeding costs and labor, it doesn’t matter if the calves aren’t gaining to full potential during winter, she believes, as they make up for it on grass the next spring. “In today’s world, a person may be better off with a little less gain at that point in the calf’s life and a lot less expense,” she says.

Because the husband-wife team weigh their calves, they have the numbers to support their management choice.

“When we weaned replacement heifers in late November and ran them with the herd as weaned calves, those heifers were only gaining 0.25 lb./day. This past year, leaving all the calves on the cows and bale-grazing until March, the heifers averaged about 1 lb./day,” Krista says. She surmises that, in past years, the pecking order affected the calves and they didn’t do as well competing with the cows. Last winter, that little bit of milk in their diet helped a lot.

It was interesting to see the difference in calf size from the same cow. “The full-blood siblings were 80-100 lbs. heavier than the calves from the year before. It was the same genetics; the only thing we changed was leaving them on the cow,” she says.

Bale grazing pairs

Ken Miller has been bale-grazing cow-calf pairs through winter the past four years on his ranch south of Bismarck, ND. “Two of those years we had about 100 in. of snow, and it still worked fine,” he says.

He usually put out a week’s worth of baled feed at different locations, moving the cattle to the next bunch of bales, rather than hauling feed. In the past four winters, Miller says he’s used less than 100 gals. of diesel fuel in his tractor to feed 100 pairs.

“Some people think calves won’t perform well in very cold weather, but they do quite well when wintered with their mothers on hay. We wean in late March. Since we don’t calve until late May and early June, the cows have adequate time to recover.”

When the calves are weaned, Miller feeds them apart from the cows for a month, still bale-grazing. He just trails the cows home, leaving several older cows with the calves. He bands the bull calves and puts the calves back with the cows, so everything can be run as one herd.

“Calving in May and June limits a person to selling light calves if you’re marketing them in November. But if you leave them on the cows, run them on grass the next year and sell them in August or September, they’re a good weight, and you don’t have much feed investment in that animal,” Miller says.

He used to calve in February and March, wean calves in late October and background them, and sell them in January and February. But he realized he’d invested a lot of feed and fuel in them over that time.

A person sometimes has to adapt ideas to fit his own conditions, Miller says. “If you get locked into doing things a certain way just because that’s the way you’ve always done it, you’re liable to miss some opportunities.”

Following nature

Gearld Fry, an Arkansas stockman who has studied cattle nutrition and genetics for many years, says a calf develops a more efficient rumen if it can nurse from its mother until about 10 months of age.

“To become most efficient at digesting forage, a calf needs to stay on his mother so the rumen can develop to optimum potential. The cow’s butterfat enables the villi in the rumen to fully develop. If the calf doesn’t get the butterfat for 10 months, he is inferior in his digestive ability to what his genetics would dictate,” Fry explains.

Fry says no man-made supplement can equal what the cow will give the calf. “The dam’s milk is specifically designed for that calf.” And, he says, Mother Nature programmed cattle — like bison — to spend the first winter with their mothers.

“You can’t do as much for that calf as its mother can. Even at the expense of her body condition, you’re better off to let her feed her calf. If she isn’t calving again until May or June, it doesn’t matter if she loses 200-300 lbs. from summer weight. If she has 45 days of green grass before calving again, she will put on enough body condition to have a healthy calf, and rebreed within about 85 days,” he explains.

“In the lactating cow during the dead of winter, most of the fluid from her udder is butterfat,” Fry says. She is giving less volume than she would on green grass, but the quality is very high.

“Bison are the most closely related wild animal today to our cattle, with nine-month gestation. They have their babies in April or May, and breed back quickly. If we imitate nature and let the calf stay at Mother’s side through winter, all she needs is 45 days to dry off and prepare for the next calf with adequate colostrum, and then breed back,” Fry says.

Fry uses electric fence to creep-feed calves in winter. “I put a bale of my best hay where I can let the calves get to it and the cows can’t. The calf is old enough to be ruminating well by that time,” Fry says. Calves don’t need grain, but they do need good-quality forage.

“There are other ways to creep-feed a calf without using grain. A New Hampshire stockman has a 20-acre field of triticale for calves to graze. Even though it gets bitterly cold in New Hampshire, his calves do very well left on the cows.

“He gets a lot of growth on the triticale before freezing weather, and uses electric fence to keep cows out. The calves go under that fence to graze the triticale all winter. It is incredible how good those calves look. They had their mothers, and good grazing — the best of both worlds.”

Heather Smith Thomas is a rancher and freelance writer based in Salmon, ID.

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Lowline cattle on a mission

Go ahead. Ask Lowline breeders what their small-size cattle are good for.

After over 70 years on this piece of rock called “the earth,” I’ve seen the “favored” type of cattle come full circle–with controversy at every turn. This makes a good case for expressing stocking rates as Cwt/Acre (or Kilos/Hectare) instead of head/ac (ha) like they do in South America. It would also be interesting to know how much forage per day (on an air dry basis) these cattle consume as compared to the larger breeds. – jtl

lowline cattle with handler

by Debbie Furber in Beef Cattle

These little cattle are for beef, not for show. Lowlines offer docility plus feed efficiency and small carcass size. Photo: File

Go ahead. Ask Lowline breeders what their small-size cattle are good for.

They won’t be offended.

When we asked, the breeders put docility and feed efficiency at the top of their list of useful characteristics. Many sell beef directly to consumers and say there’s no better testimony to quality and taste than repeat customers.

The first thing they’ll set straight is that the breed is 100 per cent Black Angus genetics. No gimmicks. No dwarfism gene. No “miniature” involved — just pure Angus in a compact package.

Lowline cows stand 38-44 inches high and weigh 650 to 1,100 pounds. Bulls stand 39 to 49 inches high and weigh 1,100 to 1,400 pounds with older bulls reaching 1,600 pounds.

All registered Canadian and American Lowlines are DNA tested for parentage and verification back to the Australian foundation herd at Trangie Research Centre. In 1929, the centre imported some Angus cattle from the Glencamock herd at Brandon, Man., to start a purebred Angus program for the purpose of selling quality breeding stock to producers. The herd was closed in the mid-1960s when the focus turned to research on performance testing leading into a 19-year project to evaluate how selection for growth rate would affect efficiency of converting grass to meat. One herd of Angus cattle was established to select for high yearling growth rate (high line), another to select for low yearling growth rate (low line) and a third as the control. On the whole, the high line proved to be slightly more efficient than the low line at converting grass to meat, but the conversion ratios for the majority of individuals in the low line were similar to those in the high line. The low line’s advantage was its smaller body size; therefore, lower feed intake, and, in turn, higher stocking rates that ultimately yielded more beef per acre.

The Australian Lowline Cattle Association was formed the same day as the auction to disperse the herd after the research program ended in 1992. Four years later, six Lowline cows were imported to Canada for an embryo transfer program based in Alberta. The Canadian Lowline Cattle Association was formed that year and in 1998 Agriculture Canada recognized Lowline as a distinct breed.

lowline cattle

Calves of half-blood heifers bred Galloway were near as big as their dams by September.

Easy to handle; 
easy to like

“Once we found out how nice and easy to handle these cattle were, it didn’t take long. Within a year and a half we were very happy and made the decision to change over,” Brian says. “Raising the big cattle and Lowlines side by side, we could see for ourselves how much less feed it took to raise a calf to maturity or slaughter. We learned you get more beef for your buck with Lowlines.”

Today, they run 60 registered fullblood females and 30 percentage cows.

The decision had implications for their end market as well because the big cows weaned 800-pound calves, whereas the fullblood Lowline calves weighed around half that.

Their freezer beef market evolved with all percentage calves going into a 75-day finishing program. Their taste preference is for grain-fed beef, so the calves receive a homegrown oat-barley grain mix with free-choice hay from May into July. They finish out at 800 to 900 pounds at 15 to 17 months of age, yielding 500- to 600-pound carcasses.

Diana Lillefloren of Idaho Lowline Cattle Co. at Hayden, Idaho, says she can’t keep enough Lowline beef on hand to keep up with customer demand. She got into Lowlines in 2009 after learning about their quiet nature and feed efficiency. They’ve proven out on both counts, with feed cost being about half that of her Angus cows.

Katherine and Darren Wise of Tunk Mountain Ranch, near Omak, Washington, owe their start in the beef business three years ago to Lowline cattle. They were looking for some type of livestock to raise on the 120-acre farm they had purchased and were first drawn to Lowlines because of the breed’s docile nature. They purchased three bred cows and a bull and have built the herd up to 17 animals without one birthing problem.

Commercial conveniences

“Lowline is a breed that can help commercial guys,” Russ says. Their bull customers appreciate the calving ease, especially for heifers. They like that they can downsize their cow herd in one cross using Lowline bulls, thereby reducing feed requirements and cost in short order. Meat quality and the smaller portion size are important for commercial customers who farm-gate beef.

He says Lowline cattle are reminiscent of the original Angus cattle of the sixties. In their grass-fed operation, the cows mature at 900 to 1,000 pounds and the bulls at 1,200 to 1,700 pounds. The percentage calves wean off at around 580 to 650 pounds.

In the Shields Valley near Wilsall, Montana, Karen and David Shockey of Muddy Creek Ranch run a 200-head grass-fed natural-beef operation supplying packaged beef for their own customers and a restaurant at Wilsall, a handful of high-end restaurants at Bozeman, the school district and some retail stores.

The calm temperament, calving ease, hardy calves and feed efficiency of Lowlines are bonuses in their operation, Karen says. Her late father’s initial reason for introducing Lowline cattle into their Angus-based breeding program in 2004 was to get more primals per acre.

Using Lowline bulls on the Angus cows has reduced cow size and they find they can graze 10 Lowlines for every six regular-sized Angus cows on the same number of acres, even though they had been selecting their Angus genetics for performance in a grass-fed program.

“We also needed the ability to grass finish steers at 18 months that would meet all our criteria,” she explains. The target is at least 60 per cent in the choice grade. The Angus calves couldn’t finish in one winter and they found that holding them the full two years changed the flavour of the beef more toward the gamey side.

Up to 120 head a year are processed at the state’s only USDA-approved plant, which designates three selected harvest dates to process Muddy Creek Ranch cattle only.

All 170 commercial Angus and Lowline-influence cows are bred Lowline. The cross-bred calves weigh 55 to 75 pounds at birth, finish out by 18 months and yield 550- to 600-pound carcasses — big enough to be profitable without compromising quality.

Brian Walters, Walters Land and Cattle Co., at Fort Lupton, Colorado, and partner with the Shockeys in Foundation Beef Sires, has collected data over seven years comparing commercial cattle to Lowline-influence cattle in his grain-fed operation.

Eye on the future

They were seriously considering getting out of cattle altogether five years ago when they found a small Lowline herd in Alberta for sale and purchased six females. The small size and docility of the Lowline breed were exactly what they were looking for to encourage involvement of their children, James and Melissa, who found the full-size Angus cattle too intimidating. The family now has 18 fullblood females and three fullblood bulls along with some commercial Angus and Galloway cattle.

True to testimony, they’ve found their Lowline cows to be easy calvers with good milking ability that deliver hardy 40- to 50-pound calves.

The fullblood cows weigh 850 to 1,000 pounds, which keeps feed costs down, yet the calves wean off around 450 to 500 pounds. Pound for pound this is a higher percentage of cow weight than the calves off the 1,300-pound cows, Cathy says.

They can attest to the breed’s claim of high rib-eye area per hundredweight with one of their bull calves having an 11.72-square-inch rib-eye area at 800 pounds. The optimum rib-eye area for finished beef regardless of breed is 11 to 15 square inches.

This is the first year they’ve used fullblood Lowline bulls on their commercial cows and those calves weighed 500 to 600 pounds at five months of age, she adds. The half-blood Lowline heifers bred back to a Galloway bull had no calving issues and the calves were nearly as big as their mothers by early September.

Prospects for the breed’s future look promising, especially with the shift toward smaller-framed cows and interest in backgrounding and finishing calves on grass, says Lee, who is the association’s general manager.

The breed won’t be able to host a show at Agribition this year, but the national show is running as usual during Farm Fair International at Edmonton.

The association now has members from coast to coast. Find out more about them and Lowlines at the Canadian Lowline Cattle Association website.

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Bison killing to go on despite lack of proof

There has never been a documented case of Yellowstone bison transmitting the bovine disease brucellosis to domestic cattle… “Asking the right questions means making sure the right people with the right expertise and appropriate background are on the review panel.”

It is not a case of too many bison (or elk or aoudad or any other species). It is a case of too many government “scientists” and enviro-wacko journalists. But that sort of thing is perfectly predictable in a centrally planned socialistic society. — jtl, 419

by Todd Wilkinson via Jackson Hole News & Guide

Yellowstone’s chief scientist David Hallac was driving home to Mammoth from Bozeman, Montana, last Sunday when he encountered this sight at the southern edge of Paradise Valley well outside the national park: More than 100 wild elk feeding on hay in close quarters with domestic beef cows.

How ironic, he thought.

Only weeks from now, Montana, with tacit approval of the federal Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, will force Yellowstone to commence another bison killing season.

Perhaps 900 of the popular national park icons will be gunned down or shipped to slaughterhouses in what has become a bloody, contentious ritual.

There has never been a documented case of Yellowstone bison transmitting the bovine disease brucellosis to domestic cattle. Still, 7,800 bison have been killed since 1985 for heeding their ancient migratory instincts and leaving the park — the same as brucellosis-infected elk do — to go into Montana.

As Montana Gov. Steve Bullock and APHIS know, every single case of brucellosis transmission, wildlife-to-cattle, has come from infected wild wapiti.

The proliferation of brucellosis-infected elk is a chronic animal health issue in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. It is worsened by 22 Wyoming-operated elk feedgrounds and the National Elk Refuge in Jackson Hole and abetted by APHIS’s sister agency in the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the U.S. Forest Service, which allows some of its public lands in Wyoming to be used for controversial feedlots.

Recently APHIS, knowing the National Park Service wanted the National Academies of Science to conduct an extensive review of disease management protocols for wildlife and livestock in the tri-state region, beat it to the punch.

Montana wildlife advocate Kathryn QannaYahu does not believe APHIS made the pre-emptive request to resolve glaring inconsistencies and contradictions in its own policies relating to bison, elk, brucellosis, chronic wasting disease and cattle.

Instead, it’s an attempt by APHIS to obfuscate public scrutiny of its heavy-handed mandates resulting in needless slaughter of bison, its unachievable goal of brucellosis eradication, fear tactics it has applied to ranchers and the blind eye it has cast on the most troubling known reservoirs of disease — Wyoming’s 23 feedgrounds.

In 1998, the last time the National Academies reviewed brucellosis policies, Montana’s entrenched intolerance toward park bison, driven by APHIS, was deemed problematic and wasteful of millions of tax dollars.

Now 16 years later, more is known. Better forensic capabilities identified elk as being responsible for wildlife-to-cattle brucellosis transmissions.

Also known and acknowledged by wildlife and livestock officials in Wyoming is that Strain 19, a vaccine developed to protect cattle and reduce the prevalence of brucellosis in elk, has been ineffective.

Millions of additional tax dollars have been squandered operating Wyoming’s test and slaughter program with elk at the feedgrounds, affirming assertions that brucellosis persistence isn’t likely to be reduced until elk feedlots are shuttered.

The 1998 National Academies’ findings, critics say, were overly optimistic in suggesting an effective vaccine and a method of dispensing it to thousands of bison, tens of thousands of elk and other wildlife species that carry brucellosis and to hundreds of thousands of cattle was possible.

Experts today say eradication is impossible, as there exists no viable, cost-effective and publicly acceptable eradication scenario for brucellosis in wildlife. Nor is any in sight.

The National Academies’ new study comes at the same time federal and state agencies in Greater Yellowstone are rewriting the Interagency Bison Management Plan because the old plan is grossly out of date.

APHIS’s attempt to steer the National Academies’ scope of scientific inquiry caught even agencies in Wyoming and Idaho off guard.

“It’s vitally important that NAS probe and ask the right questions so that we are led to solutions rather than to more intractable conflict,” Yellowstone’s Hallac says. “Asking the right questions means making sure the right people with the right expertise and appropriate background are on the review panel.”

Critics say that if the NAS is tasked only with approaching brucellosis as a “wildlife problem” pinned on the backs of bison — and not considering the health of wildlife at an ecosystem level — then the region is doomed to repeat the same failed policies that harm not only wildlife but the public’s trust in government.

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Is Ranching An Art Or A Science? Or Both?

By Burke Teichert in Strategic Planning For The Ranch

Observation is important

It’s an art to know ‘what, how, when and how much’ when managing a biological system for long-term productivity and sustainability.

When I am engaged in managerial thought and decision-making, I often wonder if it is art or science? And is it good science or bad science or, perhaps good science poorly applied? Or, is it good art or bad art, or an attempt at good art that is poorly done?

I’ve been criticized for being anti-science, but I’m not anti-science. I’m very pro science. Whatever understanding of biological systems I have been able to achieve has come because of science. However, my approach is probably a little different that many agricultural managers.

I believe we should use science to understand nature and then work within the context of natural systems. Nature will always place limitations – some of which we have learned how to challenge, but nature will always fight back or take something from us in exchange for what we want.

Anticipating the tradeoffs

Good, broadly based science should help us anticipate some of these tradeoffs. I sometimes use the tendency to select for more weaning weight and higher milk production in our cattle as an example. I know we pay a price in reduced stocking rates and in feed supplementation, and I’m quite sure we also pay a price in reproduction and herd health. It will take some artistry to recognize when we have done enough or perhaps gone too far.

In some cases, it seems as if we are at war with nature. Good soil scientists know what makes a good soil, and many producers are learning and implementing farming and grazing techniques that can improve the soil by putting more carbon (organic matter) into the soil. This ultimately results in more life in the soil – setting up a symbiotic relationship between plants and soil micro-organisms whereby they feed each other.

But we are so anxious to kill everything that might endanger the current yield that we undo almost as fast as we do. It’s estimated that, for every insect pest, there are several hundred beneficial insects. Do our pesticides only kill the bad guys? No! So, what have we done to soil-building and natural defense mechanisms when our first tendency is to kill the bad guys?

 

It’s a real art to know what the soil needs right now to build for the future, and to recognize when the short-term good of a pesticide can be offset by letting or helping nature achieve a protective balance. We worm cattle, and the cattle no longer need to develop their own resistance to worms; nor will they be culled for lack of resistance.

In the meantime, the worms develop resistance to the wormers. I won’t say, “Never use a wormer;” but I will say “Be careful to know when and if you should.” Remember, you aren’t just killing undesirable pests. You’re killing countless thousands of small organisms that could be doing good things for long-term soil, livestock and ecosystem health in every dimension.

We should remember that scientific experimentation and well-run trials only show tendencies. Usually, only one output result is measured as the result of using or changing the level of one input. The researcher tries to hold everything else constant from one replication to another except the location and the weather. Even then, the conditions are not the same as on your ranch, and there are more effects than the one measured.

Have you ever watched a scientist present his findings to a group of cattlemen where the data shows a positive difference between the treatment and control groups? As he shows the comparison, he may say there is no difference. Well there was a difference; he just meant it isn’t statistically significant at the .05 or .01 level.

If the difference is statistically significant, it means that it is almost certain there will be a positive difference in other situations (like your ranch). However, it may be a smaller or larger difference than observed in the research trial.

Your observation (monitoring and measuring) will be your servant in long-term adjustments to practices suggested by research. You will not only observe the intended primary response, but any other results (good or bad) of adopting or modifying the practice.

Thus, I maintain that research only suggests tendencies and rarely measures effects beyond the primary or intended effect. It’s very gratifying to see more systems research now being done that takes a number of years and several replications to come to good conclusions.

For instance, some of the work on protein supplementation for cows grazing in the winter (which started at the University of Nebraska a number of years ago and continues) shows a number of desirable effects for the protein supplementation. The thing that many overlook is that it requires very little supplement to get many of the desired results, and all of the results are probably not known yet. In addition, the exact amount of supplementation is not known, either, and will vary by location and cow condition.

The science teaches us about nature – the soil, the animals, the other creatures above and below the soil surface, and the interconnectedness of the whole biological system. I believe it takes an artist to see how all our scientific learning can come together to provide quality of life, profitable businesses and a sustainable land base that is rich in soil, crops, pasture, domestic livestock, wildlife, and insects. I’ve seen too many ranchers and researchers try to manage by recipe to heal abused land or to make good land better. It doesn’t work, and then they blame the “method,” the “approach,” or the person who suggested it.

In actuality, it is they who don’t work. It’s an art to know what, how, when and how much when managing a biological system for long-term productivity and sustainability.

Those managers who nicely blend art and science are constantly adjusting to fit climatic conditions and their previous unintended, best-effort mistakes. Management of biological systems buffeted by climate is like low-stress livestock handling. We constantly make mistakes. The art comes in keeping the mistakes small, recognizing them quickly and taking immediate corrective action.

It’s an art to see how nature builds her own defense mechanisms to keep a natural system balanced, productive and viable. And it’s an art to enhance that, rather than diminish, and use it to our advantage.

Burke Teichert, consultant on strategic planning for ranches, is retired as vice president and general manager of Deseret. He resides in Orem, UT, and can be reached at burketei@comcast.net.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View

edited by

Dr Jimmy T (Gunny) LaBaume

Is now available in both PAPERBACK and Kindle

BookCoverImageMurray N. Rothbard was the father of what some call Radical Libertarianism or Anarcho-Capitalism which Hans-Hermann Hoppe described as “Rothbard’s unique contribution to the rediscovery of property and property rights as the common foundation of both economics and political philosophy, and the systematic reconstruction and conceptual integration of modern, marginalist economics and natural-law political philosophy into a unified moral science: libertarianism.”

This book applies the principles of this “unified moral science” to environmental and natural resource management issues.

The book started out life as an assigned reading list for a university level course entitled Environmental and Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View.

As I began to prepare to teach the course, I quickly saw that there was a plethora of textbooks suitable for universal level courses dealing with environmental and natural resource economics. The only problem was that they were all based in mainstream neo-classical (or Keynesian) theory. I could find no single collection of material comprising a comprehensive treatment of environmental and natural resource economics based on Austrian Economic Theory.

However, I was able to find a large number of essays, monographs, papers delivered at professional meetings and published from a multitude of sources. This book is the result. It is composed of a collection of research reports and essays by reputable scientists, economists, and legal experts as well as private property and free market activists.

The book is organized into seven parts: I. Environmentalism: The New State Religion; II. The New State Religion Debunked; III. Introduction to Environmental and Natural Resource Economics; IV. Interventionism: Law and Regulation; V. Pollution and Recycling; VI. Property Rights: Planning, Zoning and Eminent Domain; and VII. Free Market Conservation. It also includes an elaborate Bibliography, References and Recommended Reading section including an extensive Annotated Bibliography of related and works on the subject.

The intellectual level of the individual works ranges from quite scholarly to informed editorial opinion.

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Posted in Ranch business planning, Ranch Economics | Tagged , , , , , , | 1 Comment

VIDEO: High density cattle grazing

Circle H Ranch uses temporary fences, wires to manage pasture grazing

man in pasture with cattle

Brian Harper, Circle H Farms Photo: Meghan Mast

Along with his family, Brian Harper runs a cow-calf and breeding stock operation at Circle H farms, just west of Brandon, Man.

Earlier this year, Harper started a high density grazing program for his cattle using temporary fences and wires within an eight-acre paddock. An automatic gate opening system set to open at specific times of the day was used to restrict the cattle’s grazing area.

“We have a higher number of cattle, on a smaller piece of grass, for a short time,” says Harper. “It’s not near as much work as people think it is.”

The benefits to the grazing area are numerous: manure is spread more evenly, the soil is healthier, and the quality of grasses is better. The end result Harper hopes for? His cattle should have better weight gain with their improved foraging.

Hear more in the short video below recorded and edited by Manitoba Co-operator reporter Meghan Mast.

http://c.brightcove.com/services/viewer/federated_f9?isVid=1&isUI=1

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The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsThe Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits. Although woven around the experiences and adventures of one man, this is also the story of the people who lived during the period of time in American history that an entire generation was betrayed It is the story of the dramatically changing times in which this personal odyssey took place. It is the story of thebetrayal of an entire generation of Americans and particularly the 40% (of the military aged males) of that generation that fought the Vietnam war.

Combat Shooter's Handbook Combat Shooter’s Handbook. Call for a pizza, a cop, and an ambulance and see which one arrives first. So, who does that leave to protect you, your life, property and family? The one and only answer is: YOU This Handbook is intended to help you exercise that right and meet that responsibility. Available in both paperback and Kindle versions.

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Horse Training for Flexibility, Part 2

Keeping your horse on a correct arc can work wonders for his flexibility.

The key to a perfect circle is maintaining your horse’s bend. Jean Abernethy illustration

horse bending exerciseBy AQHA Professional Horseman Al Dunning in The American Quarter Horse Journal

In Part 1 of this series, we discussed the anatomy of getting a correct bend. Now, let’s move on to keeping your horse on a correct arc.

Riding Circles

The real key to a perfect circle is maintaining that bend. You don’t want an egg-shaped circle or a circle like a flat tire, but one that is truly round.

Don’t make your circle so tight that you have a lot of arc on your horse, but just a slight arc. You can accomplish that at the walk and the jog. As your horse becomes more flexible, your circle can become smaller.

When you go to the lope in this perfect circle, it has to become larger or you’re going towrestle your horse so much you irritate him to the point where he resents you and what you’re asking him to do. I always like to start larger and then bring it down smaller as I train the horse to maintain that arc.

When you work on bending your horse into circles, find something to use as a focal point at the center of the circle. It can be a bush, tree, barrel, cone or even a clod of dirt in the arena. You want to make an equal circle around all sides of that marker.

Don’t constantly look at your focal point, though. I tell people to glance to the inside butlook forward over the horse’s head; glance, but look forward.

For more training techniques, check out AQHA’s FREE Horse Training Fundamentals report. AQHA Professional Horseman Ken McNabb shares his basic techniques for horses of all ages and disciplines.

If you always look to the inside, your horse, your hands and your body will follow your eyes and throw the horse off. You have to know where you are by glancing at that focal point but concentrating on going forward.

You can use cones to help you learn to see your circles. Let’s say your arena is 100 by 200 feet. You can make one exact 100-foot circle at one end. Put a cone in the center of the arena; put a second cone one-quarter of the way around the circle, against the fence; a third cone halfway around the circle, against the fence; and one more cone three-quarters around the circle, again against the fence.

When I teach, I call those “bases.” Home base is the cone at the center of the arena; first base is the cone one-quarter of the way around the circle, second base is at halfway around the circle, third base is three-quarters around the circle.

That will help you feel the arena size and learn how to aim for the bases so that all sides are equal, (maintaining the same arc in between each base).

You can adjust those cones for any size circle you want to make, and travel either inside the cones or outside them.

Eventually, you’ll get to the point where you can take the cones away, maintain your horse’s bend and make a continuous, perfect circle.

To maintain forward motion in your circle, keep using your legs and think “forward.” Looking up helps a lot. When people look down, they forget where they are going.

Teaching Bending With a Neck Rein

When you lay the rein on the horse to neck rein, a lot of horses give because the neck rein pressure pulls to the outside. If you’re turning to the right it pulls on the left side of the bit a little.

But when you lay the rein on the neck, you want the horse to move away from that pressure and look to the inside.

Bending is just one of the many fundamentals your horse should know. Let Ken McNabb share more basic training techniques with you by downloading AQHA’s FREE Horse Training Fundamentals report today.

If a horse isn’t trained to move away from the neck pressure (or look to the inside when touched on the outside with the neck rein) then he has a lack of bend and a lack of response. His head will drag behind him, and his shoulder will go first, and he won’t step across properly to make a correct turn.

To teach the horse how to move into the circle, you lay the outside rein on the horse’s neck and use inside leg to push the hip to the outside of the circle. That teaches the neck to go to the inside of the circle in response to the slight rein pressure.

Then, if you need reinforcement, you slightly pick up on your inside rein to bend the horse around.

Working on Stiffness

When the horse is what we call “stiff,” he doesn’t make his body concave into the circle. We spend some time, then, using our inside leg and our inside rein, bending the horse and teaching that horse to arc his body.

In those cases, we spend a lot of time just using our legs on the horse, riding him forward, bending him to the right, bending him to the left, backing him up and rocking our hands. You move the horse around one way and use your inside leg, and you move the horse around the other way. Then you ride the horse forward with your legs and rock the reins until the horse gives its face.

Never be firm with your hands! Have some movement and feel with your hands so that the horse learns to give, not resist.

When the horse finally responds to the inside rein and leg, turns to the inside and follows its head, then we can use a little outside leg for impulsion at that time, and he will still stay in the correct arc.

RELATED POSTS:

Horse-Training for Flexibility, Part 1

Horse Training During Warm-Ups

Steal Some Horse-Training Moves From Dressage

Horse Training on a Loose Rein

Cow-Horse Training Strategies: Part 1

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A Handbook for Ranch ManagersA Handbook for Ranch Managers.  In keeping with the “holistic” idea that the land, the livestock, the people and the money should be viewed as a single integrated whole: Part I deals with the management of the natural resources. Part II covers livestock production and Part III deals with the people and the money. Not only would this book make an excellent basic text for a university program in Ranch Management, no professional ranch manager’s reference bookshelf should be without it. It is a comprehensive reference manual for managing the working ranch. The information in the appendices and extensive bibliography alone is worth the price of the book.

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualPlanned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual. This is the ideal squeal to A Handbook for Ranch Managers.  Although the ecological principles remain the same, what was originally known as “The Savory Grazing Method” now answers to a multitude of different names: ranching for profit, holistic management, managed grazing, mob grazing, management intensive grazing, etc. Land & Livestock International, Inc. uses “Restoration Grazing” under its “Managing the Ranch as a Business” program.” No mater what you call it, this summary and synopsis will guide you step by step through the process and teach you how to use it as it was originally intended. No more excuses for failing to complete your grazing plans.

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White House Unveils $100B “Climate” Schemes, Mocks Congress

I wish somebody would put an eye roll button on this thing. Sigh… — jtl

by   via The New American

White House Unveils $100B “Climate” Schemes, Mocks Congress

The Obama White House, working with a taskforce of alarmist “leaders” from across the country, unveiled the latest chapter this week in what it called the “important steps” that the administration is taking to purportedly prepare America for the dangers of supposed man-made “global warming”: propagandizing children, commandeering state and local governments, and much more. The fresh announcements about Obama’s “climate toolkit” and the taskforce “recommendations” came as record cold swept much of the nation and most Americans faced unusual subfreezing temperatures — a humorous and regularly occurring phenomenon amid “global warming” announcements often described as the “Gore Effect.” The price tag of the anti-“warming” schemes for beleaguered taxpayers could be upwards of $100 billion, according to news reports. And the administration says its schemes cannot be stopped.

Amid the announcement, top administration officials were busy mocking the American people’s elected representatives — the same people the White House expects to force their constituents to fund the “climate” machinations. Even more outlandish, perhaps, were administration claims that Congress would not be able to derail the schemes. “I believe the president will complete the actions,” claimed John Podesta, Obama’s radical policy architect, on a November 17 conference call. “It is a top priority of his and I don’t believe they can stop us, notwithstanding Sen. McConnell making this a top priority to leave the status quo, to leave the air dirtier.” Of course, independent scientists have long ridiculed the notion that the essential-to-life gas carbon dioxide — exhaled by humans and required for plant life — constitutes “pollution” that makes the air “dirty.”

On November 17, the White House also released the “recommendations” put forward by its task force composed of carefully selected global-warming alarmists and Obama apparatchiks convened by the president. In essence, the group recommended that the federal government unlawfully and unconstitutionally insert itself further into the affairs of state and local governments on everything from “building codes,” education, and emergency management to “human health” and “adjusting the way they manage natural resources.” The outfit, formally dubbed the State, Local, and Tribal Leaders Task Force on Climate Preparedness and Resilience, offered a stunning range of controversial plans to manage your life and your community.

“The Task Force’s recommendations are the culmination of a year of work to solicit input from across State, local, Tribal, and territorial governments, trade associations, academic organizations, civil society, and various other stakeholders and translate their first-hand experiences into action items for the Federal Government to support climate-ready communities,” declared the White House announcement. “For example, the recommendations address how the Federal Government can limit disease spread that is caused or exacerbated by climate change through the development and enhancement of climate-sensitive health tracking and surveillance tools, and call on the Federal Government to integrate climate resilience planning and preparedness criteria throughout existing Federal programs, such as those that provide transportation funding.”

Among the specific announcements unveiled this week is a new Obama “training program” to teach the local bureaucrats and politicians in your city or town how to implement the White House’s climate schemes. The new plot, set to be run by the scandal-plagued Environmental Protection Agency, will include a “climate adaptation training module for local government officials” that will “help” them on “questions about climate impacts and resilience opportunities specific to their community.” Other new programs include an “app” created by the Obama Department of Energy — infamous most recently for squandering billions of taxpayer dollars on cronyism under the guise of pursuing “clean energy” — that will apparently track gas stations and electricity after disasters.

One of the most alarming programs involves “educating” — read brainwashing — impressionable American children to believe the discredited climate doomsday prophecies put forward by the administration and the United Nations. Perhaps even more shocking: the “education” plot will be run by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, headed by Obama’s infamous Science Czar John Holdren, a neo-Malthusian crackpot whose book Ecoscience openly advanced forced abortions, mass involuntary sterilization via the water supply, and a “planetary regime” to control resources under the guise of battling “overpopulation.” Holdren is also a former man-made global-cooling alarmist and has recently become the subject of intense ridicule — especially after he contradicted UN warmist dogma by blaming record cold on global warming last year.

“The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) is launching a Climate Education and Literacy Initiative, which has been developed in collaboration with Federal partners and shaped by input from communities and organizations across the country,” the administration said. “OSTP will convene leaders in education and climate science from the public, private, nongovernmental, and philanthropic sectors at the White House to discuss new commitments and steps to connect our students and citizens with the skills they will need to succeed as tomorrow’s community leaders, city planners, and entrepreneurs, in the context of a changing climate. This effort is a key step in growing a next-generation American workforce that is equipped with scientific information and tools, grasps the climate-change challenge, and is empowered to develop and implement solutions.”

The administration also unveiled this week a costly new global-warming scheme touted as the “Climate Resilience Toolkit.” According to a White House press release, the alleged service “provides for the first time easy, intuitive access to dozens of Federal tools that can directly help planners and decision makers across America conduct their work in the context of a changing climate.” In other words, the plot is essentially a tool for lower-level central planners across the country to access instructions from Obama-approved central planners in Washington, D.C, on how to manage the lives and communities of Americans — all under the guise of battling “global warming,” which according to the satellite temperature record stopped 18 years ago. And that is just the beginning. “In the coming months, it will be updated to address additional areas such as water, ecosystems, transportation, and health,” the announcement said.

As The New American reported last week, Obama is also currently preparing to unleash a devastating avalanche of “climate” decrees on the American people and the economy — much of it via federal “regulations” and unconstitutional executive orders. Among other schemes, the administration is plotting what industry experts have said would be the most expensive regulation in American history, potentially putting millions of American jobs at risk. Also on the agenda are massive handouts to Third World regimes, an economy-destroying UN climate regime to be imposed without Senate ratification, a climate deal with the ruthless Communist dictatorship ruling mainland China, and much more. On all of it, the administration — behaving more like a Third World despot than a president with a narrowly defined job description outlined in the Constitution he swore to uphold — insists that Congress can do nothing but submit.

However, despite much of the establishment press parroting the bizarre White House claims that Congress is essentially powerless to derail the predicted climate onslaught, anyone who has read the Constitution knows that lawmakers still have the power of the purse. That means stopping Obama’s lawless and anti-constitutional decrees can be done simply by refusing to appropriate any funding for the schemes — assuming Republicans are actually serious about doing what they told voters they would do. With polls showing a solid majority of Americans reject the UN-Obama global warming theories, there is virtually no public support for Obama’s antics, either — even among the remaining climate faithful.

The White House, then, appears to be banking on the GOP selling out those who elected them. Or, alternatively, the administration may be hoping lawmakers can be coerced and extorted into funding the schemes by Obama’s threat to veto all spending bills that do not fund his climate plots. That could end up shutting down miniscule portions of Leviathan, with the increasingly discredited establishment press being relied upon to shriek about how Republicans “shut down the government.” Of course, GOP leaders in both houses of Congress have vowed to rein in Obama’s “global warming” antics and the out-of-control EPA. American liberties and jobs literally depend on it. Whether Republicans in Congress will keep their word, though, remains to be seen.

Alex Newman is a correspondent for The New American, covering economics, education, politics, and more. Follow him on Twitter @ALEXNEWMAN_JOU. He can be reached at anewman@thenewamerican.com

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View

edited by

Dr Jimmy T (Gunny) LaBaume

Is now available in both PAPERBACK and Kindle

BookCoverImageMurray N. Rothbard was the father of what some call Radical Libertarianism or Anarcho-Capitalism which Hans-Hermann Hoppe described as “Rothbard’s unique contribution to the rediscovery of property and property rights as the common foundation of both economics and political philosophy, and the systematic reconstruction and conceptual integration of modern, marginalist economics and natural-law political philosophy into a unified moral science: libertarianism.”

This book applies the principles of this “unified moral science” to environmental and natural resource management issues.

The book started out life as an assigned reading list for a university level course entitled Environmental and Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View.

As I began to prepare to teach the course, I quickly saw that there was a plethora of textbooks suitable for universal level courses dealing with environmental and natural resource economics. The only problem was that they were all based in mainstream neo-classical (or Keynesian) theory. I could find no single collection of material comprising a comprehensive treatment of environmental and natural resource economics based on Austrian Economic Theory.

However, I was able to find a large number of essays, monographs, papers delivered at professional meetings and published from a multitude of sources. This book is the result. It is composed of a collection of research reports and essays by reputable scientists, economists, and legal experts as well as private property and free market activists.

The book is organized into seven parts: I. Environmentalism: The New State Religion; II. The New State Religion Debunked; III. Introduction to Environmental and Natural Resource Economics; IV. Interventionism: Law and Regulation; V. Pollution and Recycling; VI. Property Rights: Planning, Zoning and Eminent Domain; and VII. Free Market Conservation. It also includes an elaborate Bibliography, References and Recommended Reading section including an extensive Annotated Bibliography of related and works on the subject.

The intellectual level of the individual works ranges from quite scholarly to informed editorial opinion.

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Posted in Climate Change, Global Warming | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

HB148, the Transfer of Public Lands Act

American Lands Council
Recently the S.J. Quinney College of Law put out a paper claiming that UT’s HB148, the Transfer of Public Lands Act, doesn’t have any legal merit.  Apparently, they forgot to do their homework.Click on the image below and listen in as ALC President Ken Ivory shows the obvious flaws in their arguments on the Rod Arquette show.

105.7_image.jpg
To read more, click here.Please share this link with all those within your circle of influence and ask them to sign our petition.
Thanks!

Becky Ivory
http://www.americanlandscouncil.org/

American Lands Council · 10808 S River Front Pkwy, #334, South Jordan, UT, United States

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The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)The Essence of Liberty Volume I: Liberty and History chronicles the rise and fall of the noble experiment with constitutionally limited government. It features the ideas and opinions of some of the world’s foremost contemporary constitutional scholars. This is history that you were not taught at the mandatory government propaganda camps otherwise known as “public schools.” You will gain a clear understanding of how America’s decline and decay is really nothing new and how it began almost immediately with the constitution. Available in both paperback and Kindle versions.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume II (The Economics of Liberty)The Essence of Liberty Volume II: The Economics of Liberty will introduce the reader to the fundamental principles of the Austrian School of Economics. The Austrian School traces its origins back to the Scholastics of Medieval Spain. But its lineage actually began with Carl Menger and continued on through Adam Smith, Ludwig von Mises, Murray Rothbard and many others. It is the one and only true private property based, free market line of economic thought. Available in both paperback and Kindle versions.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)The Essence of Liberty Volume III: Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic. This is the volume that pulls it all together. With reference to Hans-Hermann Hoppe’s description of Murray Rothbard’s work, it is a “unique contribution to the rediscovery of property and property rights as the common foundation of both economics and political philosophy, and the systematic reconstruction and conceptual integration of modern, marginalist economics and natural-law political philosophy into a unified moral science: libertarianism.” Available in both paperback and Kindle versions.

Posted in Private Property Rights on the "Public" Domain, Public Domain, Public Lands | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

COOL as is can’t be patched to satisfy WTO, Vilsack says

Do not be fooled by purposefully misleading names. There is no such thing on earth as “free trade.” All trade of any consequence (as governed by the likes of NAFTA, GAT, etc.) is “managed trade.” — jtl, 419

Trade body’s compliance panel shot down Washington’s  revisions

by  at the Canadian Cattlemen

(Photo courtesy Canada Beef Inc.)

(Photo courtesy Canada Beef Inc.)

 

U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack, speaking Monday on a U.S. Department of Agriculture podcast, said officials “do not think that there is a regulatory fix” for COOL that would remain “consistent with the law, which I’ve sworn to uphold” and to satisfy the World Trade Organization.

A WTO compliance panel last month publicly panned Vilsack’s changes to COOL following challenges by Canada and Mexico against his final rule.

The panel found that where COOL “accords imported Canadian livestock treatment less favourable than that accorded to like domestic livestock,” Vilsack’s revision last year “increases the original COOL measure’s detrimental impact on the competitive opportunities of imported Canadian livestock.”

The panel has recommended the WTO’s Dispute Settlement Body (DSB) formally ask the U.S. government to bring the inconsistent measure “into conformity with its (trade) obligations.”

The U.S. Trade Representative’s office is still “studying the potential to appeal” the compliance panel ruling, USDA said Monday.

However, Vilsack said on Monday’s USDA Daily Radio Newsline, “our Canadian and Mexican friends have to tell us, more clearly and more specifically, what, if any, variation of (COOL) will work for them.”

That, he said, or the U.S. Congress “has to give (USDA) different directions that would allow us to comport with the WTO ruling to prevent whatever potential retaliation may occur now.”

The compliance panel was convened last year to rule on whether the U.S. final COOL law meets the U.S. government’s WTO obligations, in the wake of previous rulings by the WTO DSB and Appellate Body against the earlier version of the COOL rule.

Passed by the U.S. government in 2008 and implemented in 2009, COOL legislation requires country-of-origin labelling for beef, pork, lamb, chicken and goat meat, and certain perishable commodities sold at retail outlets in the U.S.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s revisions in 2013, in the wake of the Appellate Body ruling, tightened COOL’s labeling provisions for muscle cuts of meat. COOL now requires covered products’ labels to include even more specific information about where each production step (birth, raising, slaughter) took place.

Barring a U.S. appeal against the compliance panel’s ruling, Canada and Mexico are both now calling for Washington to scrap COOL, on pain of retaliatory tariffs against a range of U.S.-made ag commodities and other goods.

Canada last summer made out a shortlist of proposed retaliatory tariffs, targeting U.S. live cattle and hogs and fresh and frozen beef and pork products as well as U.S. cereal, bread, pasta, frozen potatoes, frozen orange juice, wine, cheese, cocoa, apples, cherries, fowl, maple syrup, ketchup, sugars, glucose and fructose and some other food- and non-food-related wares. — AGCanada.com Network

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The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsThe Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits. Although woven around the experiences and adventures of one man, this is also the story of the people who lived during the period of time in American history that an entire generation was betrayed It is the story of the dramatically changing times in which this personal odyssey took place. It is the story of thebetrayal of an entire generation of Americans and particularly the 40% (of the military aged males) of that generation that fought the Vietnam war.

Combat Shooter's Handbook Combat Shooter’s Handbook. Call for a pizza, a cop, and an ambulance and see which one arrives first. So, who does that leave to protect you, your life, property and family? The one and only answer is: YOU This Handbook is intended to help you exercise that right and meet that responsibility. Available in both paperback and Kindle versions.

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Web Site for Rural Land Owners

If you own rural land, you will be interested in this web site. It contains lots of information and tools for protecting your property rights. — jtl

http://www.narlo.org/index.html

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The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)The Essence of Liberty Volume I: Liberty and History chronicles the rise and fall of the noble experiment with constitutionally limited government. It features the ideas and opinions of some of the world’s foremost contemporary constitutional scholars. This is history that you were not taught at the mandatory government propaganda camps otherwise known as “public schools.” You will gain a clear understanding of how America’s decline and decay is really nothing new and how it began almost immediately with the constitution. Available in both paperback and Kindle versions.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume II (The Economics of Liberty)The Essence of Liberty Volume II: The Economics of Liberty will introduce the reader to the fundamental principles of the Austrian School of Economics. The Austrian School traces its origins back to the Scholastics of Medieval Spain. But its lineage actually began with Carl Menger and continued on through Adam Smith, Ludwig von Mises, Murray Rothbard and many others. It is the one and only true private property based, free market line of economic thought. Available in both paperback and Kindle versions.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)The Essence of Liberty Volume III: Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic. This is the volume that pulls it all together. With reference to Hans-Hermann Hoppe’s description of Murray Rothbard’s work, it is a “unique contribution to the rediscovery of property and property rights as the common foundation of both economics and political philosophy, and the systematic reconstruction and conceptual integration of modern, marginalist economics and natural-law political philosophy into a unified moral science: libertarianism.” Available in both paperback and Kindle versions.

Posted in Private Property Rights, Uncategorized | Tagged | Leave a comment