Dec LC Carve Out a Trading Range, Bears in the Weeds

By Cassie Fish, CassandraFish.com via The Beef

Most active Dec LC is rallying this morning but it’s really been going nowhere fast. Instead for 2 weeks it’s wearing out the pavement between $165 and $170 just ahead of the roll. Dec has been supported, especially psychologically by the historical bull performance of Oct LC. But bears have a list of reasons why Oct is the end of the bull run and Dec is no good. Aspects of the bear thought process are valid and worth considering, since Dec futures expire December 31, a timeframe when both beef demand and fed cattle demand both will be limited.

Last year when packer margins were under pressure, slaughter Christmas and New Year’s holiday weeks was historically small at 432,100 and 524,800 head respectively and this year is expected to be as small or smaller. In fact last week’s kill of 576,000 head was likely the largest for the remainder of 2014 as each week until the first full kill week of January, will fall sometimes dramatically below a year ago.

Bearish Because…

Bears believe the kill cuts will be so severe for such an extended time frame that even though fed cattle numbers are low, that currentness will be chipped away week by week. With incentive to feed cattle to heavier weights pushing tonnage ever higher coupled with what the long-range weather forecast indicating a warmer and drier November than normal, bears think by the time early January is reached, the cattle feeder will have lost some significant bargaining advantage.

Of course these are just ideas and words, and Dec will probably be buffeted about between the reality of solid cash prices and expectations $170+ won’t last through the first half of November. All the while, traders will be enticed to bear spread Dec, piling on for the roll out of Dec and into Feb by funds.

Or Bullish?

There’s a couple of bullish fundamentals that may come into play that could make being short Dec uncomfortable at times. The rib primal finally broke out above $360 yesterday indicating the seasonal rally there is in force and it’s not inconceivable ribs could gain $30 more. Another is packers still have to supply kills and some plants are short bought for next week in spite of multiple tactics to avoid being so. Inquiry this week is still quite subdued, though a $168 bid or two has surfaced and a fully steady to higher cash trade is expected.

   A Pause Perhaps

The cattle trade over the next couple of months may offer something for everyone. A push over $170 followed by a break to $165 or $162 doesn’t seem out of the question. This action would translate only to another correction in a long term bull market, not a major top in a long term historical bull, unless you believe a market like this one will never experience a blow off. The Jan/Feb 2014 blistering rally was led by demand for grinding material and created by pipelines left empty by tiny holiday kills. Sound familiar? One doesn’t have to be an active grain and oilseeds traders to be aware of what an empty pipeline can do, aka, the soymeal rally of October 2014.

Dec LC may not be a standout in the Bull of 2014, but the Bull of 2015 may dim that memory very quickly.

The Beef is published by Consolidated Beef Producers…for more info click here.

Disclaimer:  The Beef, CBP nor Cassie Fish shall not be liable for decisions or actions taken based on the data/information/opinions.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View

edited by

Dr Jimmy T (Gunny) LaBaume

Is now available in both PAPERBACK and Kindle

BookCoverImageMurray N. Rothbard was the father of what some call Radical Libertarianism or Anarcho-Capitalism which Hans-Hermann Hoppe described as “Rothbard’s unique contribution to the rediscovery of property and property rights as the common foundation of both economics and political philosophy, and the systematic reconstruction and conceptual integration of modern, marginalist economics and natural-law political philosophy into a unified moral science: libertarianism.”

This book applies the principles of this “unified moral science” to environmental and natural resource management issues.

The book started out life as an assigned reading list for a university level course entitled Environmental and Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View.

As I began to prepare to teach the course, I quickly saw that there was a plethora of textbooks suitable for universal level courses dealing with environmental and natural resource economics. The only problem was that they were all based in mainstream neo-classical (or Keynesian) theory. I could find no single collection of material comprising a comprehensive treatment of environmental and natural resource economics based on Austrian Economic Theory.

However, I was able to find a large number of essays, monographs, papers delivered at professional meetings and published from a multitude of sources. This book is the result. It is composed of a collection of research reports and essays by reputable scientists, economists, and legal experts as well as private property and free market activists.

The book is organized into seven parts: I. Environmentalism: The New State Religion; II. The New State Religion Debunked; III. Introduction to Environmental and Natural Resource Economics; IV. Interventionism: Law and Regulation; V. Pollution and Recycling; VI. Property Rights: Planning, Zoning and Eminent Domain; and VII. Free Market Conservation. It also includes an elaborate Bibliography, References and Recommended Reading section including an extensive Annotated Bibliography of related and works on the subject.

The intellectual level of the individual works ranges from quite scholarly to informed editorial opinion.

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5 Ways an Investigative Reporter Got It Wrong About Beef Production

Once one understands the problem, which is government interventionism, it is pretty easy to read between the lines of articles like this one. Although Becky did a fine job of rebutting the mouth breathing moron, I see way too many references to “FDA Approved.”

Of course that rings well (has credibility) with the (intentionally) dumbed down general public who have been brainwashed into believing that government actually exists to protect us. — jtl 

by Becky Church in BEEF Editors’ Blog

Without our counterpoints to a speaker’s erroneous statements about beef production, the journalists attending a workshop on agriculture would have received only a biased perspective.

As a college sophomore pursuing a degree in agricultural education, I was encouraged by my academic advisor to attend the recent “Big Ag Business” communications and journalism workshop in Minneapolis. I decided to attend with the hope of gaining some useful information that would allow me to further develop my skills as an agricultural advocate.

After a round of introductions, my friend and I, both raised on farms, realized we were the only students in attendance amongst a full room of professional journalists. The workshop began with a session titled “An Overview of Reporting on Agribusiness,” during which speakers suggested websites for finding expert opinions and studies regarding practical agricultural concerns that they felt would help capture public attention and make for successful stories. However, the session left me a little apprehensive, as many of the sources seemed biased against agriculture.

In the next session, “Covering Agribusiness and Food Safety,” I became even more concerned by the remarks of an investigative reporter from Kansas.

Here are some of the points he made, and how I responded during the event:

1) “Ag-gag laws are made to prevent journalists to take an aggressive look at agriculture.”

Some state legislatures have passed what are termed “ag-gag” laws. These laws are aimed at protecting the privacy of farms by prohibiting surreptitious filming by animal activist groups. The reporter told conference attendees that People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) had contacted him with undercover images of a farm abuse scene, but claimed that ag-gag laws prevented use of the pictures.

I told him that what he was given appeared to be Photoshopped images. “The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) and PETA alter lighting and angles to make normal farm scenes look terrorizing,” I responded. I assured him that we, as farmers, care deeply for the comfort, health, and overall well-being of our animals. Yes, there are bad apples on every tree, but the majority do it right.

2) “Have you ever toured a beef feedlot? Have you ever been allowed to see what goes on behind the scenes in the beef industry? Ag doesn’t want us to know the truth.”

I confidently responded that my best friend lives on a beef feedlot. She and her family walk the cattle regularly, looking for any sick cattle, which are only administered FDA-approved antibiotics on an individual basis as needed. I pointed out that perhaps a broader perspective was in order. After all, according to the report, “Antibiotic Resistance Threats in the United States,” published by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), “50% of all the antibiotics prescribed for people are not needed or are not optimally effective.”

3) “Food re-salvaging happens in all processing plants. All the fat, excess trimmings, and workers’ gloves, hair, etc. falls below onto a conveyor belt where it is ground up into stuff like pink slime. This contaminated food is packaged for resale.”

Food is not purposely contaminated, nor sold. Consumers hear of more food recalls today simply because the advanced technology exists to more minutely identify it. So-called “pink slime,” or lean, finely texturized beef, is made via a USDA-approved process and billions of pounds have been produced and safely consumed over the past several decades.

4) “Even cattle with cancer and abscesses are still packaged for meat, but chlorine and ammonia is poured over it to disinfect it. The USDA is cutting over 600 employees, so food inspection standards are going to get worse. Just because something is stamped with the label ‘Passed and Inspected by USDA,’ does not mean it is safe, or that it has been inspected at all.”

Any abscesses or imperfections are cut out of the meat before it is packaged for retail. USDA inspection guidelines are followed strictly and technology allows inspectors to prevent over 5,000 potential food-borne illnesses each year (USDA Food Safety Inspection Services).

5) “I have no doubt that family farms like yours are doing it right, but large operations are bad.”

Farms are not factories. Christensen Farms in Minnesota, for instance, is among the five largest pork producers in the U.S. and is completely family-owned. Biosecurity and ethical treatment are practiced no matter what level or size of farm.

Needless to say, many of this speaker’s remarks upset me. Yet, I am grateful that my friend and I attended this event. Without our counterpoints to the speaker’s false accusations, only a biased perspective would have been offered.

When the speaker asked for questions, my friend and I raised our hands and took the opportunity to teach. We said we were both very disappointed in the negative picture presented about agriculture. We pointed out that an earlier presenter had stressed that “successful reporters are those who actually go out to the source.” I expressed my disappointment that he, the Kansas speaker, had not personally talked to farmers when covering his stories.

As we left the meeting, my friend and I reflected on what we thought would have been a highly useful and educational event. I decided that I did in fact walk out of the workshop as a more effective agricultural advocate, it just did not happen the way that I was expecting it to.

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The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)The Essence of Liberty Volume I: Liberty and History chronicles the rise and fall of the noble experiment with constitutionally limited government. It features the ideas and opinions of some of the world’s foremost contemporary constitutional scholars. This is history that you were not taught at the mandatory government propaganda camps otherwise known as “public schools.” You will gain a clear understanding of how America’s decline and decay is really nothing new and how it began almost immediately with the constitution. Available in both paperback and Kindle versions.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume II (The Economics of Liberty)The Essence of Liberty Volume II: The Economics of Liberty will introduce the reader to the fundamental principles of the Austrian School of Economics. The Austrian School traces its origins back to the Scholastics of Medieval Spain. But its lineage actually began with Carl Menger and continued on through Adam Smith, Ludwig von Mises, Murray Rothbard and many others. It is the one and only true private property based, free market line of economic thought. Available in both paperback and Kindle versions.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)The Essence of Liberty Volume III: Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic. This is the volume that pulls it all together. With reference to Hans-Hermann Hoppe’s description of Murray Rothbard’s work, it is a “unique contribution to the rediscovery of property and property rights as the common foundation of both economics and political philosophy, and the systematic reconstruction and conceptual integration of modern, marginalist economics and natural-law political philosophy into a unified moral science: libertarianism.” Available in both paperback and Kindle versions.

Posted in Food and Fiber Issues | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Deadline Extended

from Patrick Bray, EVP, Arizona Cattlemen’s Association

Submit Comments to Stop EPA from Expanding Clean Water Act Authority

If you haven’t yet submitted comments, do so now before the November 14th deadline with a few easy steps!

  1. Click HERE for comments you can mail to the EPA. Please feel free to edit them if you would like or send them as they are written. (That is a pdf that cannot be edited if you would like the word document contact us. In order to link in this email we had to make it a pdf).
  2. Print off FOUR copies
  3. Sign each one and mail them together to:

Water Docket, Environmental Protection Agency, Mail Code 2822T, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20460, Attention: Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-OW-2011-0880.

You can also click here to quickly send a letter to your members of Congress today. A template is provided, and will take no more than a couple minutes to send. If you have any questions, please contact me at pbray@arizonabeef.org or 602-267-1129.

For reference here is the letter that the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association and the Public Lands Council sent in.

-Patrick

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A Handbook for Ranch ManagersA Handbook for Ranch Managers.  In keeping with the “holistic” idea that the land, the livestock, the people and the money should be viewed as a single integrated whole: Part I deals with the management of the natural resources. Part II covers livestock production and Part III deals with the people and the money. Not only would this book make an excellent basic text for a university program in Ranch Management, no professional ranch manager’s reference bookshelf should be without it. It is a comprehensive reference manual for managing the working ranch. The information in the appendices and extensive bibliography alone is worth the price of the book.

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualPlanned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual. This is the ideal squeal to A Handbook for Ranch Managers.  Although the ecological principles remain the same, what was originally known as “The Savory Grazing Method” now answers to a multitude of different names: ranching for profit, holistic management, managed grazing, mob grazing, management intensive grazing, etc. Land & Livestock International, Inc. uses “Restoration Grazing” under its “Managing the Ranch as a Business” program.” No mater what you call it, this summary and synopsis will guide you step by step through the process and teach you how to use it as it was originally intended. No more excuses for failing to complete your grazing plans.

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Feds Move to Make ‘Climate Change’ Solutions Part of Organic Food Production

You “organic et al” guys are going to love this one. (Tongue in cheek.) — jtl

U.S.D.A. to Start Program to Support Local and Organic Farming … The organic food business in the United States reached $35 billion last year. The United States Department of Agriculture … will spend $52 million to support local and regional food systems like farmers’ markets and food hubs and to spur research on organic farming. The local food movement has been one of the fastest growing segments of the business, as consumers seek to know more about where, how and by whom their food is grown. – New York Times

Dominant Social Theme: Getting the federal government involved in the details of small-farm food distribution is a big step forward.

Free-Market Analysis: We’ve been following the “organic promotion” meme and this article from the New York Times posted at the end of September further buttresses the transition of natural food from a private initiative to a public one.

We haven’t labeled this the “organic meme” because we believe there are plenty of farmers and producers in the US and the West generally that are dedicated to natural and whole foods while rejecting pro forma USDA labeling guidelines. We’ll stick with “organic promotion.”

What we can see from this Times article, however, is that in the US anyway, fedgov continues to make inroads at every level of the local foods movement.

What is unfortunate is that once funding has been applied, the USDA and FDA are in a good position to further redefine the “organic” movement in ways that will make it more controllable and more appealing to entrenched agricultural interests.

Here’s more:

Farmers’ markets are proliferating around the country, increasing 76 percent to 8,268 since 2008, according to the Agriculture Department, but they have trouble marketing themselves. And few consumers are aware of a website the department created to help them find a farmers market in their area.

“These types of local food systems are the cornerstones of our plans to revitalize the rural economy,” Tom Vilsack, the agriculture secretary, said in a telephone interview. “If you can connect local produce with markets that are local, money gets rolled around in the local community more directly compared to commercial agriculture where products get shipped in large quantities somewhere else, helping the economy there.”

The $52 million will be the first outlay to local and organic enterprises of the farm bill signed into law by President Obama in February, which tripled the amount of money aimed at that sector to $291 million. The organic business, which has long complained that the Agriculture Department does not support it financially, will get $125 million over the next five years for research and $50 million for conservation programs.

“It’s a really nice bump for us because we’ve been getting chump change for research,” said Mark Kastel, co-founder of the Cornucopia Institute, an organic research and advocacy group. Still, Mr. Kastel said that given the growth in the organic business, with about $35 billion in sales in the United States last year, he wished there was more money to study organic practices.

We did a bit of research on the Cornucopia Institute and found this paragraph in a study entitled “Cereal Crimes”: “Organic farming also benefits the environment in terms of global climate change, since organic farmers use fewer fossil-fuel-based inputs, and healthy organic soil sequesters carbon.”

Once more we see “global climate change” creeping into the discussion of “organic” foods! Why ag watchdog groups should make preventing climate change part of a ratings system is surely a mystery, especially as there is less and less evidence of “global warming” overall.

Whether farmers ought to be using gas-powered tractors is perhaps another question, but also one that seems to us somewhat incidental to the quality of the produce itself. But that is what’s going on. The sector is hot and thus amenable to larger promotional paradigms of fedgov and Big Ag.

We can see this operative element in the announcement of the recent awards program at the USDA website.

Awards Over $52 Million in Grants to Grow Organic and Local Food Economies … Through the Organic Research and Extension Initiative, USDA is awarding more than $19 million in grants to help producers and processors who have already adopted organic standards grow and market high-quality organic agricultural products.

The fine print makes clear what the USDA priorities include, however. “This year grants focused on … organic farming systems that … contribute to climate change mitigation.”

You see? Organic as a label is gradually being converted into a system of agriculture that includes – ineluctably – methodologies to combat global warming. Yet, as we understand it, there hasn’t been any evidence of “global warming” for about 16 years now. And, further, what evidence did or does exist for global warming likely has no basis in manmade carbon production.

Nonetheless, it seems that one of the emergent preoccupations of those working with “organic” labeling and the local-foods movement generally is the sequestering or diminishing of carbon.

The idea that the diminishment of the production of one of the two gases necessary for life on Earth is somehow to be seen as supportive of organic food production is ironic, to say the least.

Surely, there is a great deal of difference between the rapidly expanding “organic promotion” and those farmers and consumers that are focused on the production and ingestion of healthy, safe and “whole” food.

- See more at: http://www.thedailybell.com/news-analysis/35770/Feds-Move-to-Make-Climate-Change-Solutions-Part-of-Organic-Food-Production/#sthash.u0CkoUjm.dpuf

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The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)The Essence of Liberty Volume I: Liberty and History chronicles the rise and fall of the noble experiment with constitutionally limited government. It features the ideas and opinions of some of the world’s foremost contemporary constitutional scholars. This is history that you were not taught at the mandatory government propaganda camps otherwise known as “public schools.” You will gain a clear understanding of how America’s decline and decay is really nothing new and how it began almost immediately with the constitution. Available in both paperback and Kindle versions.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume II (The Economics of Liberty)The Essence of Liberty Volume II: The Economics of Liberty will introduce the reader to the fundamental principles of the Austrian School of Economics. The Austrian School traces its origins back to the Scholastics of Medieval Spain. But its lineage actually began with Carl Menger and continued on through Adam Smith, Ludwig von Mises, Murray Rothbard and many others. It is the one and only true private property based, free market line of economic thought. Available in both paperback and Kindle versions.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)The Essence of Liberty Volume III: Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic. This is the volume that pulls it all together. With reference to Hans-Hermann Hoppe’s description of Murray Rothbard’s work, it is a “unique contribution to the rediscovery of property and property rights as the common foundation of both economics and political philosophy, and the systematic reconstruction and conceptual integration of modern, marginalist economics and natural-law political philosophy into a unified moral science: libertarianism.” Available in both paperback and Kindle versions.

Posted in Climate Change, Food and Fiber Issues, Global Warming | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

Bringing In The Horses – Hunewill Ranch

Lots of horses. You guys that are doing planned grazing and looking for things like hoof action and herd effect should know that horses are actually better at that than are cattle. That is because of the way they scuff their feet when they walk. — jtl

via Richard Beal’s Blog

Taken at the Hunewill Ranch in Bridgeport, California. Aspen, Sierra and Eli run in the ranch horse on June 27,2014. A GoPro camera was mounted low on a fence post to capture the action from a unique angle

If you have problems seeing the video below click HERE.

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The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsThe Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits. Although woven around the experiences and adventures of one man, this is also the story of the people who lived during the period of time in American history that an entire generation was betrayed It is the story of the dramatically changing times in which this personal odyssey took place. It is the story of thebetrayal of an entire generation of Americans and particularly the 40% (of the military aged males) of that generation that fought the Vietnam war.

Combat Shooter's Handbook Combat Shooter’s Handbook. Call for a pizza, a cop, and an ambulance and see which one arrives first. So, who does that leave to protect you, your life, property and family? The one and only answer is: YOU This Handbook is intended to help you exercise that right and meet that responsibility. Available in both paperback and Kindle versions.

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Corn Steals the Limelight as Cattle Pause

From The Beef By Cassie Fish, CassandraFish.com

CBOT corn futures have put together a brilliant and unexpected rally since October 1, 53 cents off of the lows. A ploddingly slow harvest combined with a bin-ringing empty pipeline and aggressive initial demand by the livestock and ethanol industries are responsible for bringing Dec corn back to its 100-day moving average for the first time since May.

This big corn rally has taken the shine off of feeder cattle futures, which has in turn diminished enthusiasm for deferred fats. Corn harvest hasn’t even passed the 50% mark yet, reported yesterday at 46%, 19% behind average. Which translates to most market watchers wondering how much of a retracement corn will have as harvest draws to a close. Corn’s technical performance, an outside month with a very likely higher close, is so positively powerful and unheard for October, market watchers can’t help but wonder what more it portends.

2014-10-28_Chart1

CME Cattle Futures Lower

With no compelling new bullish cattle news, futures are retracing today. Interest in trading cattle futures has waned too, with yesterday’s volume in LC very light at 27,676 contracts. Spot Oct LC will expire Friday and as the calendar turns to November, Dec LC will undergo the selling pressure of the roll.

Boxes Higher; Cash Cattle Quiet

USDA boxed beef prices posted healthy gains yesterday, a trend expected to continue through the week, which will shore up packer margins. There are also widespread expectations of a much smaller cattle kill this week, a 20,000 head drop from last week’s 576,000 head, as packers begin the task of matching their inventory of tight fed cattle supplies with slaughter needs over the next 4 full kill weeks, all the while trying to improve margins.

Can Cash Cattle Move Higher from Here?

The real question here, as LC futures consolidate near their highs, is whether additional upside in cash cattle prices are possible or even necessary over the next few weeks. The answer will boil down to how well packers are covered on inventory between now and Thanksgiving. It is packer competition for fats that got us to $170 and it will take another round of the same to propel us further.

The Beef is published by Consolidated Beef Producers…for more info click here.

Disclaimer:  The Beef, CBP nor Cassie Fish shall not be liable for decisions or actions taken based on the data/information/opinions.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View

edited by

Dr Jimmy T (Gunny) LaBaume

Is now available in both PAPERBACK and Kindle

BookCoverImageMurray N. Rothbard was the father of what some call Radical Libertarianism or Anarcho-Capitalism which Hans-Hermann Hoppe described as “Rothbard’s unique contribution to the rediscovery of property and property rights as the common foundation of both economics and political philosophy, and the systematic reconstruction and conceptual integration of modern, marginalist economics and natural-law political philosophy into a unified moral science: libertarianism.”

This book applies the principles of this “unified moral science” to environmental and natural resource management issues.

The book started out life as an assigned reading list for a university level course entitled Environmental and Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View.

As I began to prepare to teach the course, I quickly saw that there was a plethora of textbooks suitable for universal level courses dealing with environmental and natural resource economics. The only problem was that they were all based in mainstream neo-classical (or Keynesian) theory. I could find no single collection of material comprising a comprehensive treatment of environmental and natural resource economics based on Austrian Economic Theory.

However, I was able to find a large number of essays, monographs, papers delivered at professional meetings and published from a multitude of sources. This book is the result. It is composed of a collection of research reports and essays by reputable scientists, economists, and legal experts as well as private property and free market activists.

The book is organized into seven parts: I. Environmentalism: The New State Religion; II. The New State Religion Debunked; III. Introduction to Environmental and Natural Resource Economics; IV. Interventionism: Law and Regulation; V. Pollution and Recycling; VI. Property Rights: Planning, Zoning and Eminent Domain; and VII. Free Market Conservation. It also includes an elaborate Bibliography, References and Recommended Reading section including an extensive Annotated Bibliography of related and works on the subject.

The intellectual level of the individual works ranges from quite scholarly to informed editorial opinion.

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3 Beef Headlines: McDonald’s vs. Chipotle & Fat vs. Carbs

by Amanda Radke in BEEF Daily

This week’s beef headlines look at consumer concerns about hormones in beef, an expert’s view on why animal fats and proteins are essential for optimal health, and a new comparison of McDonald’s vs. Chipotle that knocks the burrito chain down a peg or two. Here are three news items worth checking out this week.

1. “Fear Mongering Is A Poor Marketing Tactic” by Jennifer Campbell for Farm Progress

“Fear over facts is nothing more than a coward’s way to get attention,” writes Campbell, in her response to a friend on Facebook who was worried about added hormones in McDonald’s beef.

Read her complete response here.

 2. “Why Experts Now Think You Should Eat More Fat” featured in Men’s Journal

Here is an excerpt from the article, which champions beef as a health food:

“According to a new study from the National Institutes of Health, a diet that reduces carbohydrates in favor of fat – including the saturated fat in meat and butter – improves nearly every health measurement, from reducing our waistlines to keeping our arteries clear, more than the low-fat diets that have been recommended for generations.”

3. “Is Chipotle Really Healthier Than McDonald’s?” by Quentin Fottrell for Market Watch

Here is an excerpt from the article which shows that Chipotle doesn’t stand on the healthy high ground that it says it does:

“The earnings of McDonald’s Corp. and Chipotle Mexican Grill Inc. this week have illustrated a bit of conventional wisdom: that fresher, healthier, made-to-order meals from upstart fast-casual chains are stealing diners (and profit) from legacy burger joints. But is a meal from Chipotle really all that much better for you than one from McDonald’s?

“One Chipotle burrito can be twice the calories of a Big Mac and have nearly a full day’s worth of calories. A burrito with chicken, white rice, black beans, fajita vegetables, tomatillo-green chili salsa, guacamole and cheese with a side order of chips is 1,695 calories — and has 690 milligrams of sodium. (Chipotle states 2,300 milligrams of sodium are the recommended limits for a 2,000 calorie daily diet.) A Big Mac — with two beef patties, cheese, onions, lettuce, pickles, ‘special’ sauce, and buns made with high fructose corn syrup — has 530 calories, and 960 milligrams of sodium. A large order of French fries adds another 510 calories.”

Read the complete article, which compares the two fast food restaurants, here.

What do you think of this week’s headlines? Share your thoughts in the comments section below.

The opinions of Amanda Radke are not necessarily those of Beefmagazine.com or the Penton Farm Progress Group. 

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A Handbook for Ranch ManagersA Handbook for Ranch Managers.  In keeping with the “holistic” idea that the land, the livestock, the people and the money should be viewed as a single integrated whole: Part I deals with the management of the natural resources. Part II covers livestock production and Part III deals with the people and the money. Not only would this book make an excellent basic text for a university program in Ranch Management, no professional ranch manager’s reference bookshelf should be without it. It is a comprehensive reference manual for managing the working ranch. The information in the appendices and extensive bibliography alone is worth the price of the book.

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualPlanned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual. This is the ideal squeal to A Handbook for Ranch Managers.  Although the ecological principles remain the same, what was originally known as “The Savory Grazing Method” now answers to a multitude of different names: ranching for profit, holistic management, managed grazing, mob grazing, management intensive grazing, etc. Land & Livestock International, Inc. uses “Restoration Grazing” under its “Managing the Ranch as a Business” program.” No mater what you call it, this summary and synopsis will guide you step by step through the process and teach you how to use it as it was originally intended. No more excuses for failing to complete your grazing plans.

Posted in Cattle Production, Food and Fiber Issues | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

The Ride with Cord McCoy: Miniature Bull Riding

What an opportunity! jtl

http://www.cowhorseproductions.com: Cord McCoy talks with miniature bull riders at the National Western Stock Show.

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View

edited by

Dr Jimmy T (Gunny) LaBaume

Is now available in both PAPERBACK and Kindle

BookCoverImageMurray N. Rothbard was the father of what some call Radical Libertarianism or Anarcho-Capitalism which Hans-Hermann Hoppe described as “Rothbard’s unique contribution to the rediscovery of property and property rights as the common foundation of both economics and political philosophy, and the systematic reconstruction and conceptual integration of modern, marginalist economics and natural-law political philosophy into a unified moral science: libertarianism.”

This book applies the principles of this “unified moral science” to environmental and natural resource management issues.

The book started out life as an assigned reading list for a university level course entitled Environmental and Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View.

As I began to prepare to teach the course, I quickly saw that there was a plethora of textbooks suitable for universal level courses dealing with environmental and natural resource economics. The only problem was that they were all based in mainstream neo-classical (or Keynesian) theory. I could find no single collection of material comprising a comprehensive treatment of environmental and natural resource economics based on Austrian Economic Theory.

However, I was able to find a large number of essays, monographs, papers delivered at professional meetings and published from a multitude of sources. This book is the result. It is composed of a collection of research reports and essays by reputable scientists, economists, and legal experts as well as private property and free market activists.

The book is organized into seven parts: I. Environmentalism: The New State Religion; II. The New State Religion Debunked; III. Introduction to Environmental and Natural Resource Economics; IV. Interventionism: Law and Regulation; V. Pollution and Recycling; VI. Property Rights: Planning, Zoning and Eminent Domain; and VII. Free Market Conservation. It also includes an elaborate Bibliography, References and Recommended Reading section including an extensive Annotated Bibliography of related and works on the subject.

The intellectual level of the individual works ranges from quite scholarly to informed editorial opinion.

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Posted in Rodeo, Uncategorized | Tagged , , | 1 Comment